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    Default Re: what last music bio book have you read?...

    Currently reading Mayte Garcia's book on Prince. Very interesting read.
    “If you enter this world knowing you are loved and you leave this world knowing the same, then everything that happens in between can be dealt with.”
    ~ * ~ Michael Jackson ~ * ~

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    Default Go-Go Live: The Musical Life and Death of a Chocolate City {2012}



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    Default Re: what last music bio book have you read?...

    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
    I'm reading it now actually.

    I'm a huge fan of his so I'm loving it. I'm not too far in. I'll give a better review when I finish.
    Realise I never came back to give a review on this.

    Absolutely loved reading it. I find usually with these books it's the artist's earlier days that fascinate me most but I found it quite slow and once Bruce gets to the point of getting his first recording deal it just sped right up and became much more engaging. He talks very frankly about his depression through the years but it's often what he leaves out that is most telling. Indeed in the final passages of the book he admits he has not told the full story for fear of offending those people it concerns. The book also has a tendency to lapse into a track by track 'review' of whatever album he made at the time and becomes a little fragmented, jumping forward and backwards to isolated events in his life. Tellingly he completely ignores his two critical and commercial failures from the early 90s, the albums Human Touch and Lucky Town - I was disappointed in this. He sort of alludes to them when discussing the album after this but he seems keen not to address them at all. Numerous times he tries to explain his position in terms of the E Street Band and their importance to him and how he sees himself as a solo artist, he talks often of the members coming to him for raises and such and telling them "no". I felt he struggled to really define his position and theirs - it had clearly led to tensions throughout the years that Bruce seemed eager to brush over. His relationship with his father is detailed throughout.

    I have another book called Springsteen on Springsteen which collates various interviews Bruce did throughout his career and reprints them in full. I'd say it was worth reading both in an attempt to obtain a full picture of the man and his career.

    My next music book is either going to be Johnny Cash's autobiography or Making Michael. But I have a number of other non-music books I'm looking at next.

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    Default Re: what last music bio book have you read?...

    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
    Realise I never came back to give a review on this.

    Absolutely loved reading it. I find usually with these books it's the artist's earlier days that fascinate me most but I found it quite slow and once Bruce gets to the point of getting his first recording deal it just sped right up and became much more engaging. He talks very frankly about his depression through the years but it's often what he leaves out that is most telling. Indeed in the final passages of the book he admits he has not told the full story for fear of offending those people it concerns. The book also has a tendency to lapse into a track by track 'review' of whatever album he made at the time and becomes a little fragmented, jumping forward and backwards to isolated events in his life. Tellingly he completely ignores his two critical and commercial failures from the early 90s, the albums Human Touch and Lucky Town - I was disappointed in this. He sort of alludes to them when discussing the album after this but he seems keen not to address them at all. Numerous times he tries to explain his position in terms of the E Street Band and their importance to him and how he sees himself as a solo artist, he talks often of the members coming to him for raises and such and telling them "no". I felt he struggled to really define his position and theirs - it had clearly led to tensions throughout the years that Bruce seemed eager to brush over. His relationship with his father is detailed throughout.

    I have another book called Springsteen on Springsteen which collates various interviews Bruce did throughout his career and reprints them in full. I'd say it was worth reading both in an attempt to obtain a full picture of the man and his career.

    My next music book is either going to be Johnny Cash's autobiography or Making Michael. But I have a number of other non-music books I'm looking at next.
    Great review. I agree that it is unfortunate that he skipped over the 'other band' years so quickly. I thought he did address his struggles with the clash between the characters in his songs and what his own life had become ("a rich man in a poor man's shirt"), and the difficulty of finding material to write about at that time nicely. With regards to not getting into certain topics because he does not want to hurt other people's feelings: it is unfortunate, but you can't really blame him. Info about tension within the band is out there already, in limited doses Mainly, it seems like Steve and Jon Landau did not get along, feelings were hurt when Bruce disbanded the band, and it took a while to fully resolve those when they came together again for the reunion tour (for instance, see Garry Tallent's comments in Peter Ames Carlin's Bruce bio). I get the sense all these guys have moved on from that now (as did Clarence and Danny before they passed) and value whatever time they have left together.

    Personally, I am always interested in more recollections about his work itself. But that clearly was not the focus of this book. Overall I thought it was a very nice and honest autobiography. When he's not asked very direct questions in interviews, Bruce has this tendency to ramble and discuss aspects of his career in very abstract terms. I was afraid the book could turn into this as well, but it really did not. It contained plenty of funny, self-depricating, and also touching stories - the parts regarding his relationship with his dad, fatherhood, and his struggles with depression in particular. He had been open about all these subjects in the past in interviews, but it was nice to read a more extensive and reflective take on it.

    Having read the book, it's no wonder that he leaves it all out on the stage night after night, and plays 4 hour shows: it seems like he needs it more than any of his fans do.

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    Default Substance: Inside New Order {2017}


    Peter Hook is the former bass player in New Order & Joy Division. Both bands had 3 of the same members. This is a long book, a little over 700 pages. I used to hear New Order on the radio, but I didn't know anything about them or even what they looked like. They were like an anonymous act to me at the time. The book is kinda different than other autobiographies I've read, in that it has little segments talking about technical things like studio lingo and how things work like the earpiece that singers/bands use on stage.

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    Default Re: what last music bio book have you read?...

    I'm currently reading Garbage's This Is The Noise That Keeps Me Awake. Great book.


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