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Thread: Country Music

   
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    Default 2017 SXSW: Garth Brooks speaks about new singer Caitlyn Smith


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    Default Roy Clark exhibit at the American Banjo Museum

    April 3, 2017 by John Lawless Bluegrass Today

    The American Banjo Museum in Oklahoma City has announced the opening this week of America’s Super Picker – Roy Clark, their exhibit showcasing the career of the popular multi-instrumentalist and singer from Virginia. Many music fans in the US know Roy primarily from his time as a co-host of Hee Haw on television, but he had a successful performing career both before and after TV. He now lives in Oklahoma not far from the museum.

    Consisting of photographs and artifacts from the personal collection of this recent inductee to the American Banjo Museum Hall of Fame, the exhibit will officially open on Thursday, April 6. Starting at 5:00 p.m., Clark will hold a press conference at the museum, after which the ceremonial opening of the exhibit will commence. ABM officers will deliver brief remarks, as will Clark, before hosting a VIP Meet and Greet with members and special guests.

    The museum boasts the world’s largest collection of banjos on public display, in over 21,000 square feet of displays, ranging from primitive instruments like the ones made by African slaves, through the Minstrel era banjos, up to the genre-defining banjos from the early 20th century up to the present day.

    The Roy Clark exhibit is scheduled to be open through March of 2018. Visitors can tour the American Banjo Museum Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., and Sundays from noon to 5:00 p.m. Admission is only $6 for adults, with discounts for seniors, military, and students. Children under 5 may attend at no charge.

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    Default Re: country music

    Country music is the best

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    Default Chris Stapleton

    Here's some tracks from Chris Stapleton's new album


    interview (
    May 11, 2017)




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    Post 'Achy Breaky Heart' at 25: Inside Billy Ray Cyrus' Polarizing Hit

    By Joseph Hudak May 26, 2016 Rolling Stone

    Billy Ray Cyrus onstage in 1993.

    "Where were you 25 years ago?" asks Billy Ray Cyrus, leaning in intently.

    The country singer, actor and dad to famous pop stars is seated in a room in the Nashville home and studio of the late Cowboy Jack Clement, but his mind is time traveling back to 1992, when one of the most polarizing songs in country music, "Achy Breaky Heart," was dominating the airwaves.

    When he gets his answer – that the writer was speeding away from his senior year of high school in an '84 Chevy Cavalier, with "Achy Breaky Heart" blaring on the local Top 40 station – the Kentucky native howls in delight. It's the memory of the car that gets him. You see, Cyrus – or whatever he's calling himself these days – loves cars. His landmark debut album, Some Gave All, which turns 25 years old this month, was practically birthed in one. Prior to cutting the record that would change his life, debuting at Number One on the country albums chart and spending 17 weeks atop the Billboard 200, Cyrus was living out of his own Chevy, a stuffed-to-the-rear window Beretta.

    "I was pretty comfortable in there. But my car had shit all over it. Well, not shit, though there was probably some of that too," he says. "There were cassette tapes, and tapes, and tapes. And guitars, and microphones rolling around the floor. If I needed anything, all my shit was in that car. That was my office."

    Those tapes that filled the backseat of his Beretta were his memos. Cyrus loves cassettes and brings them up often in conversation. They're a connection to a time gone by for the 55-year-old singer, an era when future hits could be discovered by simply pressing "play" on some unknown songwriter's hastily recorded demo.

    It was on cassette, in fact, that Cyrus first heard songwriter Don Von Tress' "Achy Breaky Heart" – then titled "Don't Tell My Heart."

    "I stood up and said, 'That's me! That's what I want to sound like, that's what I do, man!'" Cyrus says, shooting up from his chair and thrusting his hands in the air. "Thinking back on it, it just turned me on because it moved me."

    Although Some Gave All was nearly finished, Cyrus returned to the studio to cut this silly new sing-along, a track that its own writer Von Tress says was "a gift from the ether. I saw kids dancing in my mind [when I wrote it] and I remember telling my wife that and she thought I was a little screwy."

    Cyrus jettisoned one of his own compositions, "Whiskey, Wine and Beer" – "The best move I ever made in my life!" – and slapped "Achy Breaky Heart" onto his new album for Mercury Records.

    The song was a monster, knocking Sawyer Brown's "Some Girls Do" out of the top spot on the Billboard country charts the week of May 30th, 1992, and remaining there for five weeks.

    But to some, "Achy Breaky Heart" was just monstrous. Travis Tritt criticized the song as signifying a wrong direction for country music, leading Cyrus to offer a bizarre rebuttal onstage at the 1993 American Music Awards. "There have been those people perhaps due to paranoia or insecurity or perhaps they consider theirself [sic] a self-proclaimed critic … To those people who don't like 'Achy Breaky Heart,' here's a quarter, call someone who cares," he said, alluding to Tritt's own 1991 hit.

    Waylon Jennings also raised an eyebrow at Cyrus' hip-swiveling dance steps that accompanied the song.
    "Waylon had said, 'I think the boy's tennis shoes may be a little too tight,'" remembers Cyrus, who went on to became close friends with the outlaw country pioneer.

    Still, "Achy Breaky Heart" had its unexpected fans. Von Tress recalls hearing the song's merits as a "true American folk song" debated on NPR, and cites a near mythic Bruce Springsteen cover of his tune. "Springsteen said, 'I don't care what anybody says, this is a damn good song,'" recalls Von Tress. Sure enough, Springsteen did spontaneously run through "Achy Breaky" at a tour rehearsal show in 1993 in New Jersey.

    Despite, or likely because of, its love-it-or-loathe-it nature, "Achy Breaky Heart" keeps on beating. Cyrus just released two new versions and performed the "Muscle Shoals" update on NBC's Today Show. The original, meanwhile, remains a touchstone of Nineties country. It's also that rarest of gifts an artist can receive: a signature song. One that Cyrus still delivers honestly every time he strums those A and E chords.

    "Somebody was bitching back when it was released that that is just what country needs, another three-chord song," he says. "I said, ahem, 'It's only two.'"

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    Default Glen Campbell (April 22, 1936 - August 8, 2017)

    by Kristin M. Hall / AP Aug 08, 2017 Time

    (NASHVILLE, Tenn.) — Glen Campbell, the grinning, high-pitched entertainer whose dozens of hit singles included "Rhinestone Cowboy" and "Wichita Lineman" and whose appeal spanned country, pop, television and movies, died Tuesday, his family said. He was 81.

    Campbell's family said the singer died Tuesday morning in Nashville and publicist Sandy Brokaw confirmed the news. No cause was immediately given. Campbell announced in June 2011 that he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and that it was in its early stages at that time.

    "Glen is one of the greatest voices there ever was in the business and he was one of the greatest musicians," said Dolly Parton in a video statement. "He was a wonderful session musician as well. A lot of people don't realize that. But he could play anything and he could play it really well."

    Tributes poured in on social media. "Thank you Glen Campbell for sharing your talent with us for so many years May you rest in peace my friend You will never be forgotten," wrote Charlie Daniels. One of Campbell's daughters, Ashley, said she was heartbroken. "I owe him everything I am, and everything I ever will be. He will be remembered so well and with so much love," she wrote on Twitter.

    In the late 1960s and well into the '70s, the Arkansas native seemed to be everywhere, known by his boyish face, wavy hair and friendly tenor. He won five Grammys, sold more than 45 million records, had 12 gold albums and 75 chart hits, including No. 1 songs with "Rhinestone Cowboy" and "Southern Nights."

    His performance of the title song from "True Grit," a 1969 release in which he played a Texas Ranger alongside Oscar winner John Wayne, received an Academy Award nomination. He twice won album of the year awards from the Academy of Country Music and was voted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2005. Seven years later, he received a Grammy for lifetime achievement.

    His last record was "Adios," which came out in June and features songs that Campbell loved to sing but never recorded, including tunes made famous by Bob Dylan, Linda Ronstadt and Johnny Cash. Ashley Campbell, also a musician, made a quest appearance and said making the album was "therapeutic."

    Campbell was among a wave of country crossover stars that included Johnny Cash, Roy Clark and Kenny Rogers, and like many of his contemporaries, he enjoyed success on television. Campbell had a weekly audience of some 50 million people for the "Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour," on CBS from 1969 to 1972. He gained new fans decades later when the show, featuring his cheerful greeting "Hi I'm Glen Campbell," was rerun on cable channel CMT.

    "I did what my Dad told me to do — 'Be nice, son, and don't cuss. And be nice to people.' And that's the way I handled myself, and people were very, very nice to me," Campbell told The Telegraph in 2011.

    He released more than 70 of his own albums, and in the 1990s recorded a series of gospel CDs. A 2011 farewell album, "Ghost On the Canvas," included contributions from Jacob Dylan, Rick Nielsen of Cheap Trick and Billy Corgan of Smashing Pumpkins.

    The documentary "Glen Campbell ... I'll Be Me" came out in 2014. The film about Campbell's 2011-12 farewell tour offers a poignant look at his decline from Alzheimer's while showcasing his virtuoso guitar chops that somehow continued to shine as his mind unraveled. The song "I'm Not Gonna Miss You" won a Grammy for best country song in 2015 and was nominated for an Oscar for best original song.

    Campbell's musical career dated back to the early years of rock 'n roll. He toured with the Champs of "Tequila" fame when the group included two singers who formed the popular '70s duo Seals & Crofts. He was part of the house band for the ABC TV show "Shindig!" and a member of Phil Spector's "Wrecking Crew" studio band that played on hits by the Ronettes, the Righteous Brothers and the Crystals. He played guitar on Frank Sinatra's "Strangers In the Night," the Monkees' "I'm a Believer" and Elvis Presley's "Viva Las Vegas."

    "We'd get the rock 'n' roll guys and play all that, then we'd get Sinatra and Dean Martin," Campbell told The Associated Press in 2011. "That was a kick. I really enjoyed that. I didn't want to go nowhere. I was making more money than I ever made just doing studio work."

    A sharecropper's son, and one of 12 children, he was born outside of Delight, Arkansas, and grew up revering country music stars such as Hank Williams.

    "I'm not a country singer per se," Campbell once said. "I'm a country boy who sings."

    He was just 4 when he learned to play guitar. As a teenager, anxious to escape a life of farm work and unpaid bills, he moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico to join his uncle's band and appear on his uncle's radio show. By his early 20s, he had formed his own group, the Western Wranglers, and moved to Los Angeles. He opened for the Doors and sang and played bass with the Beach Boys as a replacement for Brian Wilson, who in the mid-'60s had retired from touring to concentrate on studio work. In 1966, Campbell played on the Beach Boys' classic "Pet Sounds" album.

    "I didn't go to Nashville because Nashville at that time seemed one-dimensional to me," Campbell told the AP. "I'm a jazzer. I just love to get the guitar and play the hell out of it if I can."

    By the late '60s, he was a performer on his own, an appearance on Joey Bishop's show leading to his TV breakthrough. Tommy Smothers of the Smothers Brothers saw the program and asked Campbell if he'd like to host a summertime series, "The Summer Brothers Smothers Show." Campbell shied from the Smothers Brothers' political humor, but still accepted the offer. He was out of the country when the first episode aired.

    "The whole lid just blew off," Campbell told the AP. "I had never had anything like that happen to me. I got more phone calls. It was awesome. For the first couple of days I was like how do they know me? I didn't realize the power of television."

    His guests included country acts, but also the Monkees, Lucille Ball, Cream, Neil Diamond and Ella Fitzgerald.

    He was married four times and had eight children. As he would confide in painful detail, Campbell suffered for his fame and made others suffer as well. He drank heavily, used drugs and indulged in a turbulent relationship with country singer Tanya Tucker in the early 1980s.

    He is survived by his wife, Kim; their three children, Cal, Shannon and Ashley; and his children from previous marriages, Debby, Kelli, Travis, Kane and Dillon. He had 10 grandchildren.

    In late 2003, he was arrested near his home in Phoenix after causing a minor traffic accident. He later pleaded guilty to "extreme" DUI and leaving the scene of an accident and served a 10-day sentence.

    Among Campbell's own hits, "Rhinestone Cowboy" stood out and became his personal anthem. Written and recorded by Larry Weiss in 1974, "Rhinestone Cowboy" received little attention until Campbell heard it on the radio and quickly related to the story of a veteran performer who triumphs over despair and hardship. Campbell's version was a chart topper in 1975.

    "I thought it was my autobiography set to song," he wrote 20 years later, in his autobiography, titled "Rhinestone Cowboy."

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    Default Re: country music

    R.I.P. Glen
    heal the world

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    Default Mel Tillis (August 8, 1932 - November 19, 2017)

    By Erin Nyren and Chris Willman November 19, 2017 Variety

    Mel Tillis, country music singer and songwriter, has died, the Country Music Hall of Fame confirmed in a statement. He was 85.

    According to the Tennessean, Tillis died early Sunday morning at the Munroe Regional Medical Center in Ocala, Fla. after almost two years of ill health stemming from a bout of diverticulitis, for which he received surgery. The suspected cause of death is respiratory failure.

    Tillis began recording in the late 1950s and continued to perform through 2015, but remained best known for a string of No. 1 country hits in the late ’70s, along with a succession of appearances in Hollywood movies alongside Burt Reynolds and Clint Eastwood that helped make him a household name even outside the country music sphere.

    “Mel Tillis spent a lifetime giving us joy and laughter and music, which is why his death brings such sadness,” said Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum CEO Kyle Young. “Had he never stepped on a stage, he would still have been one of the funniest and most genuine people on the planet.”

    “But his whimsy and warmth were only a part of his appeal. He wrote some of country music’s most compelling and consequential songs, he fronted a remarkable band, and he sang with power and emotion. He also shone as an inspiration, revealing what others called an impediment as a vehicle for humor and hope.”

    In 1976, Tillis won the Country Music Association’s Entertainer of the Year award and was inducted in the Nashville Songwriter’s Hall of Fame. In 2007, Tillis was inducted into the Grand Ole Opry, as well as the Country Music Hall of Fame. President Barack Obama bestowed the National Medal of Arts award upon Tillis in 2012.

    Tillis, born Lonnie Melvin Tillis, grew up in Florida and developed a stutter that would stay with him throughout his life as a result of an early bout of malaria; the stutter did not affect his singing voice. Not only did Tillis not try to hide the condition, he trumpeted it with good humor and made it enough of a trademark that he eventually titled his memoir “Stutterin’ Boy.”

    He joined the U.S. Air Force and was stationed as a baker in Okinawa, where he formed a band called the Westerners. After leaving the Air Force in 1955 and working several odd jobs, Tillis auditioned for Wesley Rose, who encouraged him to pursue songwriting. Tillis eventually moved to Nashville and began writing songs full-time, most notably for Webb Pierce.

    Through the late ’50s and ’60s, Tillis balanced his career as a then-minor hitmaker in his own right with bigger songwriting successes for other artists, including Kenny Rogers and the First Edition’s “Ruby, Don’t Take Your Love to Town” and Bobby Bare’s “Detroit City.” It wasn’t until 1971 that he had his own first No. 1 hit as a recording artist, with “I Ain’t Never,” which he followed later in the decade with the chart-toppers “Good Woman Blues,” “Heart Healer,” “I Believe In You,” and “Coca-Cola Cowboy.”

    After his recording career faded in the 1980s, Tillis acquired several radio stations including KIXZ and KYTX in Amarillo, Tex., and WMML in Mobile, Ala., which he eventually sold for a sizable profit. He also found a different kind of fame with a new generation by virtue of being the father of Pam Tillis, who had a run of 13 top 10 hits in the 1990s and often referred to her famous dad.

    Tillis was a familiar screen presence in the ’70s and ’80s, with small roles in films including “W.W. and the Dixie Dancekings,” “The Villain,” “Every Which Way But Loose,” “Smokey and the Bandit II,” and both “Cannonball Run” movies. He also briefly co-hosted an ABC prime-time series, “Mel and Susan Together,” with supermodel Susan Anton in 1978. TV guest spots were frequent, including a debut acting appearance on “Love: American Style” in 1973, followed by shows like “The Dukes of Hazard,” “The Tim Conway Show,” and “The Love Boat.”

    The most prominent latter-day cover of a Tillis song came when Robert Plant and Alison Krauss recorded “Stick With Me Baby” for their T Bone Burnett-produced “Raising Sand,” which won a 2007 Grammy for Album of the Year.

    “Mel Tillis was a guy who had it all: He could write, he could sing and he could entertain an audience,” said Grand Ole Opry announcer and WSM DJ Eddie Stubbs. “There’s a big difference between a concert and a show. Mel Tillis always put on a show….You always felt good about being around him.”

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    Default Faith Hill at Aretha Franklin funeral


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    Post Emmylou Harris Exhibit Opens at Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum

    October 2, 2018 Nonesuch

    Emmylou Harris, a twelve-time Grammy winner and a Country Music Hall of Fame member, is the subject of a major new exhibition at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, Tennessee, opening this Friday, October 5, 2018. The exhibit, titled Emmylou Harris: Songbird’s Flight, features many unique items including handwritten letters and lyrics, a Gibson J-200N acoustic guitar given to Harris by Gram Parsons, outfits worn by Harris on album covers, military decorations awarded to her Marine fighter pilot father, and more, and will run until August 4, 2019.

    Harris will take part in a special public conversation about her life and work in the museum’s CMA Theater on Saturday, November 3, 2018. Tickets are included with museum admission and is free to museum members. The program will be streamed live at countrymusichalloffame.org/streaming.

    From her start with Gram Parsons in California during the early 1970s to her acceptance in Nashville and mainstream country music in the 1980s, Harris has brought millions of new listeners to country music. Over forty years into a remarkable career, she has amassed twenty-seven Top Ten hits, including seven that reached #1. She also has placed fourteen albums in the Top Ten of the Billboard country album chart.

    "From my first album release in 1975, country music has embraced me with open arms," said Harris. "This exhibit at the Hall of Fame makes me realize once more how grateful and honored I am to be part of such a remarkable musical family."

    A champion of songwriters and musicians alike, Harris gave early career boosts to Rodney Crowell, Ricky Skaggs, Sam Bush and Buddy Miller. Countless country singers cite Harris as an influence, including Suzy Bogguss, Mary Chapin Carpenter, the Dixie Chicks, Patty Loveless and Trisha Yearwood. Harris's influence extends beyond country music, too, with acclaimed artists Patty Griffin, Lucinda Williams, and many others citing her as an artistic guidepost. Examining Harris through her music and her collection of personal artifacts will provide new insight into one of country music's most important and visionary artists.

    Buddy Miller, Emmylou Harris and Patty Griffin view Emmylou Harris' new exhibit.

    "For over 50 years, the museum has shared with its visitors the rich and diverse history of country music, while documenting the music's ongoing evolution," said museum CEO Kyle Young. "Our 2018 exhibits continue that tradition."

    One of the most visited museums in the United States, with a collection of more than 2.5 million artifacts, the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum celebrated its fiftieth anniversary in 2017. For more information, visit countrymusichalloffame.org.

    Emmylou Harris strolls through the Country Music Hall of Fame exhibit chronicling her life and career.

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    Post Roy Clark (April 15, 1933 - November 15, 2018)

    by Jem Aswad November 15, 2018 Variety

    Roy Clark, the legendary guitarist and singer, Country Music Hall of Fame and Grand Ole Opry member, Grammy, ACM and CMA award winner and co-host of the “Hee Haw” television series, died on Thursday due to complications from pneumonia at home in Tulsa, Okla. He was 85.

    His starring stint on the at times deliberately corny “Hee Haw” television show belied his stellar musicianship and deep pedigree as a country-music pioneer, particularly the “Bakersfield” sound of the late 1950s and early 1960s in which he was deeply involved with fellow picker Buck Owens, who also appeared on the show. With the later rise of country stars ranging from Emmylou Harris and Dwight Yoakam to Brad Paisley and Keith Urban, Clark’s vast influence has received its proper due. (The biography that follows is an edited version of one provided by 2911 Media.)

    Born Roy Linwood Clark on April 15, 1933 in Meherrin, Virginia, Clark moved to Washington, D.C. when he a young. His father played in a square dance band and took him to free concerts by the National Symphony and by various military bands. “I was subjected to different kinds of music before I ever played. Dad said, ‘Never turn your ear off to music until your heart hears it — because then you might hear something you like.'”

    His first guitar, a Sears Silvertone, came as a Christmas present when he was 14. That same year, 1947, he made his first TV appearance. In the fertile, diverse musical soil of cosmopolitan D.C., he began playing bars and dives on Friday and Saturday nights until he was playing every night and skipping school — eventually dropping out at 15. “Music was my salvation, the thing I loved most and did best. Whatever was fun, I’d go do that.”

    He soon went on tour with country legends such as Hank Williams and Grandpa Jones. After winning a national banjo competition in 1950, he was invited to perform at the Grand Ole Opry, which led to shows with Red Foley and Ernest Tubb. Yet he’d always return to D.C. to play not only country but jazz, pop, and early rock’n’roll. In 1954, he joined Jimmy Dean and the Texas Wildcats, appearing in clubs and on radio and TV, and even backing up Elvis Presley.

    But in 1960, he was 27 and still scrambling. An invitation to open for Wanda Jackson at the Golden Nugget in Las Vegas proved to be his big break. It led to his own tour, on the road for 345 straight nights at one stretch, and when he returned to Vegas in 1962, he came back as a headliner and recording star, with his debut album, “The Lightning Fingers of Roy Clark.” The next year, he had his first hit, “The Tips of My Fingers,” a country song that featured an orchestra and string section. “We didn’t call it crossover then but I guess that’s what it was,” he said. “We didn’t aim for that, because if you aim for both sides you miss them both. But we just wanted to be believable.”

    He first television appearances in 1963 on “The Tonight Show” and “American Bandstand” showcased his easygoing attitude and rural sense of humor. “Humor is a blessing to me. My earliest recollections are of looking at something and seeing the lighter side,” he said. “But it’s always spontaneous. I couldn’t write a comedy skit for someone else.”

    Throughout the ’60s, Clark recorded several albums, toured constantly, and appeared on many TV variety shows. “I was the token bumpkin. It became, ‘Let’s get that Clark guy. He’s easy to get along with,'” he recalled.

    Then came “Hee Haw.” A countrified comedy show with music, shot in Nashville, “Hee Haw” premiered in 1969. Co-starring Clark and Buck Owens, it was an immediate hit. Though CBS canceled the show after two-and-a-half years, despite ranking in the Top 20, the series segued into syndication, where it remained until 1992. “I long ago realized it was not a figure of speech when people come up to me and say they grew up watching me since they were ‘that big’.”

    The show launched him into stardom, and over the years he had 23 Top 40 country hits, including “The Tips Of My Fingers,” “I Never Picked Cotton,” “Thank God And Greyhound You’re Gone,” “Somewhere Between Love And Tomorrow” and “If I Had It To Do All Over Again.”

    From his home in Tulsa, where he moved in 1974 with Barbara, his wife of 61 years, Clark continued to tour extensively. “Soon as you hit the edge of the stage and see people smiling and know they’re there to hear you, it’s time to have fun,” he said. :I keep a band of great young people around me, and we’re not musically restrained. It’s not about ‘let’s do it correct’ but ‘let’s do it right.’”

    He was the rare entertainer with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and the Country Music Hall of Fame, who performed at the Grand Ole Opry and Carnegie Hall.

    “Roy Clark made best use of his incredible talent. He was both a showman and a virtuoso, with a love of music that beamed across air waves and into millions of living rooms, where families gathered to watch and listen,” Country Music Hall of Fame CEO Kyle Young said.

    Clark is survived by Barbara, his wife of 61 years, his sons Roy Clark II and wife Karen, Dr. Michael Meyer and wife Robin, Terry Lee Meyer, Susan Mosier and Diane Stewart, and his grandchildren: Scott Fearington, Brittany Meyer, Michael Meyer, Caleb Clark, Josiah Clark and his sister, Susan Coryell.

    A memorial celebration will be held in the coming days in Tulsa, Okla., details forthcoming.

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    Default Charley Pride: I'm Just Me (2019)


    American Masters Charley Pride: I’m Just Me traces the improbable journey of Charley Pride, from his humble beginnings as a sharecropper’s son on a cotton farm in segregated Sledge, Mississippi to his career as a Negro American League baseball player and his meteoric rise as a trailblazing country music superstar. The new documentary reveals how Pride’s love for music led him from the Delta to a larger, grander world. In the 1940s, radio transcended racial barriers, making it possible for Pride to grow up listening to and imitating Grand Ole Opry stars like Ernest Tubb and Roy Acuff. The singer arrived in Nashville in 1963 while the city roiled with sit-ins and racial violence. But with boldness, perseverance and undeniable musical talent, he managed to parlay a series of fortuitous encounters with music industry insiders into a legacy of hit singles, a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award and a place in the Country Music Hall of Fame. Narrated by Grammy-nominated country singer Tanya Tucker, the film features original interviews with country music royalty, including Garth Brooks, Dolly Parton, Brad Paisley, Darius Rucker and Marty Stuart, as well as on-camera conversations between Pride and special guests, including Rozene Pride (his wife of 61 years), Willie Nelson and fellow musicians.

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    Default The Highwomen - Redesigning Women

    new single


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    Default Chris Stapleton - Second One To Know

    new

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