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  1. #16
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    Default Tom Petty on Tomorrow show 1981

    Last edited by DuranDuran; 03-10-2017 at 04:47 AM.

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    Default Ann Wilson on Jimmy Kimmel Live! (September 20, 2018)



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    Default Lindsey Buckingham on Jimmy Kimmel Live! (October 2, 2018)



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    Default Fleetwood Mac on Ellen (September 5, 2018)



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    Post Lindsey Buckingham Suffers Vocal Cord Damage From Emergency Surgery

    by Andy Greene February 8, 2019 Rolling Stone

    Former Fleetwood Mac guitarist Lindsey Buckingham underwent emergency open heart surgery last week and is now recuperating at his home. “Each day he is stronger than the last,” his wife Kristen Buckingham wrote in a statement. “While he and his heart are doing well, the surgery resulted in vocal cord damage. While it is unclear if the damage is permanent, we are hopeful it is not.”

    Buckingham was forced out of Fleetwood Mac last year when Stevie Nicks made it clear to the rest of the band that she could no longer work with him. “After 43 years and the finish line so clearly in sight, it’s hard to escape the conclusion that for the five of us to splinter part would be the wrong thing,” Buckingham wrote in an e-mail to group co-founder leader Mick Fleetwood after learning the news. “At the moment, the band’s heart and soul has been diminished. But out center, which has seen us through so much, is only laying dormant.”

    The appeal didn’t work and the band brought on Neil Finn of Crowded House and Mike Campbell of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers to replace him. Buckingham sued the band over the termination, though they settled out of court. The guitarist spent the last few months playing solo gigs to promote his new three-disc set Solo Anthology: The Best of Lindsey Buckingham.

    “This past year has been a very stressful and difficult year for our family to say the least,” Kristen Buckingham wrote. “But despite all of this, our gratitude for life trumps all obstacles we have faced at this moment. We feel so fortunate that he’s alive. As does he. He looks forward to recovery and putting this behind him. Needless to say, all touring and shows currently schedule have been put on pause for the moment as he gathers the strength to heal completely.”

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    Default The Dirt trailer (2019 Mötley Crüe biopic)


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    Default Mötley Crüe feat. Machine Gun Kelly - The Dirt (Est. 1981)

    new song


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    Default Mötley Crüe - Like A Virgin

    This is another of 4 new songs recorded for the soundtrack of The Dirt

    Nikki Sixx & Allen Kovac interview about Netflix's The Dirt


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    Post Eddie Money (March 21, 1949 - September 13, 2019)

    By Shirley Halperin | September 13, 2019 | Variety

    Eddie Money, the prolific singer and songwriter whose songs “Baby Hold On,” “Two Tickets to Paradise,” “Shakin'” and “Take Me Home Tonight” soundtracked popular music in the 1980s, died Friday (Sept. 13). He was 70.

    A statement provided by his family reads: “The Money Family regrets to announce that Eddie passed away peacefully early this morning. It is with heavy hearts that we say goodbye to our loving husband and father. We cannot imagine our world without him. We are grateful that he will live on forever through his music.”

    Money recently revealed that he had been diagnosed with stage 4 esophageal cancer.
    A reality television series about Money and his family, “Real Money,” had aired on AXS TV starting in April 2018. It chronicled his life at home, on the road and with his family, as well as his health struggles.

    Money made his home in the Bay Area in the 1970s where he performed at the city’s clubs regularly. A star of MTV’s formative years, he saw major chart success with such songs as “Baby Hold On” and “Two Tickets to Paradise” and, in 1986, “Take Me Home Tonight,” a duet with Ronnie Spector, his biggest radio hit. He was signed to Columbia Records and released 11 albums throughout his career, starting with his self-titled debut in 1977 which saw three songs chart, “Baby Hold On,” “Two Tickets to Paradise” and “You’ve Really Got a Hold on Me.”

    Born Edward Joseph Mahoney in Brooklyn, New York, Money, who grew up on Long Island, originally started out in law enforcement, his father’s profession, spending two years as a New York City police officer before deciding to try music. In Berkeley, Calif. following his move out west, he palled around with local musicians of the San Francisco club scene which led him to legendary promoter Bill Graham, whom Money met in 1976. Graham would become Money’s manager helping him achieve multi-platinum album sales in the 1980s.

    Money’s arsenal of hits includes 1978’s”Baby Hold On” (peak position on the U.S. chart: No. 11) and “Two Tickets to Paradise” (No. 22), followed by “Maybe I’m a Fool” the following year (No. 22), “Think I’m in Love” (No. 16) and “Shakin'” (No. 63) in 1982, “Take Me Home Tonight” in 1986, which reached No. 4 (his highest charting song) and “Walk on Water” (No. 9) in 1988.
    During that decade-plus, Money also descended into drug and alcohol abuse, nearly dying of an overdose that left him unable to walk for a year.

    Eventually working his way back to performing live, Money was featured on a 2016 episode of “Oprah: Where Are They Now?” That led to the series “Real Money,” which debuted on AXS TV in 2018 and was on its second season.

    Occasionally, Money was also the subject of controversy. Most recently, and not of his doing, music industry pundit Bob Lefsetz took issue with a crack Money made during a talk at the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles, calling it anti-Semitic. As Money explained to Rolling Stone: “I said, ‘My wife always looks like a million bucks and she spends so much money on clothes and I hate it. It’s the Jew in me.’ And when I said that, because my mother is Jewish, Bob didn’t realize that and mentioned it [in his popular newsletter]. He thought I was Irish Catholic, Polish or German or something and all of a sudden he said I was anti-Semitic. … It was a misunderstanding and I thought it was a funny joke because I got Jewish blood in me.”

    Known also for his comedic manner, both in his music videos and in interviews, he said last year that, despite his string of hit songs, he “missed the boat when it [came] to the big money.” In his typically self-deprecating manner, Money capped the conversation with this view: “The kids aren’t in jail, they’re not in rehab, nobody’s wrecked the car this week and there’s still milk in the refrigerator. I’m having a good month.”

    Money is survived by his wife Laurie and five children, daughter Jesse Money, and sons Zachary, Joseph, Desmond and Julian.

    Said Mark Cuban, founder of AXS TV: “We are deeply saddened that we have lost the incomparable Eddie Money. Eddie was a true American original and a rock legend through and through. His enduring hits have been the soundtrack for generations of fans, and his one-of-a-kind sense of humor endeared him instantly to everyone he met. We have sincerely enjoyed working with him and his entire talented family on his reality show ‘Real Money’, and we extend our deepest condolences to his wife, Laurie; their children Zach, Jesse, Joe, Dez and Julian; and his many friends during this difficult time. He will be missed immensely by all of those who knew and loved him. But, if we know Eddie, he’s rocking right now in heaven, doing what he always loved.”

    Donations on behalf of Eddie Money can made to the Eddie Money Cancer Research Fund at the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. Find more information here.

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    Default Ric Ocasek (March 23, 1949 - September 15, 2019)

    by Jon Pareles Sept. 16, 2019 New York Times

    Ric Ocasek, the songwriter, rhythm guitarist and lead singer for the Cars, was found dead on Sunday afternoon at his townhouse in Manhattan.

    The New York Police Department confirmed the death but did not give a cause. Sources have differed on Mr. Ocasek’s age — some saying he was 70 — but a few public records and previous articles about him suggest that he was 75.

    From 1978 to 1988, Mr. Ocasek (pronounced oh-CASS-eck) and the Cars merged a vision of romance, danger and nocturnal intrigue and the concision of new wave music with the sonic depth and ingenuity of radio-friendly rock. The Cars managed to please both punk-rock fans and a far broader pop audience, reaching into rock history while devising fresh, lush extensions of it.

    The Cars grew out of a friendship forged in the late 1960s in Ohio between Mr. Ocasek and Benjamin Orr, who died in 2000. They worked together in multiple bands before moving to Boston and forming the Cars in the late 1970s with Elliot Easton on lead guitar, Greg Hawkes on keyboards and David Robinson on drums. It was the beginning of the punk era, but the Cars made their first albums with Queen’s producer, Roy Thomas Baker, creating songs that were terse and moody but impeccably polished.

    In the Cars, Mr. Ocasek’s lead vocals mixed a gawky, yelping deadpan with hints of suppressed emotion, while his songs drew hooks from basic three-chord rockabilly and punk, from surf-rock, from emerging synth-pop, from echoes of the Beatles and glam-rock, and from hints of the 1970s art-rock avant-garde.

    The five albums the Cars released from 1978 to 1984 each sold a million copies in the United States alone, with ubiquitous radio singles like “Just What I Needed” in 1978, “Shake It Up” in 1981, “You Might Think” in 1984 and “Drive” in 1984. Although Mr. Ocasek wrote them, “Just What I Needed” and “Drive” had lead vocals by Mr. Orr.

    When the Cars were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2018, the group’s surviving members reunited, joined by Scott Shriner of Weezer on bass. In his induction speech, Brandon Flowers of the Killers described the band as “a slick machine with a 340 V8 under the hood that ran on synergy, experimentation and a redefined cool. They had it all: the looks, the hooks, Beat romance lyrics, killer choruses.”

    Richard Theodore Otcasek was born in Baltimore. His father was a systems analyst for NASA. At the Cars’ Rock Hall induction, Mr. Ocasek credited his grandmother for getting him to sing as a child and buying him his first guitar at 14. The family moved to Cleveland when he was a teenager, and he briefly attended Antioch College and Bowling Green State University before dropping out and turning to music.

    After meeting Mr. Orr in Ohio, the two, performing in various bands, worked their way to the Boston area, where they started a folk-pop trio, Milkwood; it made one album, in 1972, before dissolving. But Mr. Ocasek and Mr. Orr continued to work together around Boston. Mr. Easton, the lead guitarist, joined them in the mid-1970s, playing with their band Cap’n Swing, which got airplay on Boston’s rock radio station WBCN but went no further.

    With Mr. Easton, Mr. Hawkes and Mr. Robinson — who had been the drummer for the Modern Lovers, local heroes in Boston — the Cars coalesced in 1976, working in Mr. Ocasek’s basement in Newton, Mass. They would start with Mr. Ocasek’s basic recordings of songs, Mr. Easton told Rolling Stone in 1978, and “we just built the songs up.”

    “When there was a space for a hook or a line — or a sinker — we put it in,” he added.

    WBCN gave the band’s demo recordings extensive airplay, and Elektra Records signed them. The first Cars album was made in 21 days — 12 for recording, nine for mixing. It would go on to sell six million copies in the United States. The band became a staple of FM radio in the late 1970s and of MTV in the ’80s, toying with textures and ironies but sticking to neat pop structures.

    Mr. Ocasek’s songs were invariably terse and catchy, spiked with Mr. Easton’s twangy guitar lines and Mr. Hawkes’s pithy keyboard hooks. But they were also elaborately filled out by multitracked instruments and vocals. Lyrics that might initially seem like pop love songs were, more often, calmly ambivalent.

    “Just What I Needed,”
    the Cars’ first single, revolves around negatives: “I don’t mind you coming here and wasting all my time/’Cause when you’re standing oh so near, I kind of lose my mind.” And the Cars’ biggest United States hit, “Drive,” poses a series of glum questions even as it sounds like a stately ballad: “Who’s going to hold you down when you shake?/Who’s going to come around when you break?”

    Mr. Ocasek, left, in a 1978 group portrait with the Cars; from left, Benjamin Orr, David Robinson, Elliot Easton and Greg Hawkes.

    The Cars disbanded in 1988 as Mr. Ocasek and Mr. Orr grew apart. Mr. Ocasek had begun making music on his own while still in the group and would eventually release seven solo albums from 1982 through 2005, though none achieved the popularity of his Cars catalog.

    While he said he didn’t want people prying into his personal life, “I feel that my song lyrics are kind of an open book,” he told The Chicago Tribune in 1986. “I feel that writing songs for my solo albums is kind of like spilling my guts, telling people how I really feel subconsciously. When I’m writing, it’s like I’m not really in control.”

    In 2003, he took a job at Elektra as senior vice president for artists and repertoire, charged with finding new hitmakers, but the label rejected his choices; he lasted in the post less than a year. While in the Cars, he had produced albums for punk pioneers he admired: Bad Brains and Suicide. And after the Cars disbanded, he produced music for Weezer, Bad Religion and No Doubt.
    In a post on Twitter, Weezer said the group was “devastated” by Mr. Ocasek’s death and would “forever cherish the precious times we got to work and hang out with him.”

    Mr. Ocasek in 2001 with his wife at the time, the model and actress Paulina Porizkova.

    After two previous marriages, Mr. Ocasek married the model and actress Paulina Porizkova in 1989; they met in 1984 while the Cars were making the music video for “Drive.” She announced in 2018 that they had separated a year earlier. He is survived by their two children, Jonathan and Oliver Otcasek, and four sons from previous marriages: Christopher, Adam, Eron and Derek.

    Mr. Ocasek often said that he did not enjoy the grind of touring, and Mr. Easton and Mr. Hawkes performed without him as the New Cars from 2005 to 2007, joined by Todd Rundgren as lead singer. But in 2011, Mr. Ocasek gathered the surviving members of the Cars for a final album, “Move Like This,” and a tour, although his stage presence had always been diffident.

    “I don’t think I’m an entertainer,” he told The New York Times in 2011. “I never think, Wow, I can’t wait to get the crowd moving.”

    In a pop world full of extroverts and peacocks, Mr. Ocasek presented himself as a detached, introverted craftsman, dedicated to songwriting rather than showmanship. He told The Times in 1987, “I’m happy that the pop songs have a bit of a twist. When I’m writing, I never know how it’s going to come out. I don’t think, Well, I’ve done a catchy one, now I can do a weird one. I read a lot of poetry, and that gives me a wide range of permission to say anything in a song — they’re more twisted than I’ll ever be.”

    Joe Coscarelli and Daniel E. Slotnik contributed reporting.

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