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Thread: WHO IS Visiting & WHAT IS Going On at the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame

   
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    Post Bon Jovi Reunites; The Cars, Nina Simone, Dire Straits Honored in Cleveland

    By Michele Amabile Angermiller • April 14, 2018 • Variety

    The 33rd annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony treated the audience at Cleveland’s Public Auditorium to a reunited Bon Jovi, a hilarious induction speech by presenter Howard Stern, and touching tributes to Tom Petty and Chris Cornell.

    The April 14 event kicked off with The Killers, who honored Petty with a cover of “American Girl.” Singer Brandon Flowers also nodded to a bit of “Free Falling” during the performance. It was followed by Stern’s introduction of Bon Jovi. The SiriusXM radio host, and self-anointed “King of All Media,” commented: “It took years of pondering to decide that this glorious band that sold 130 million albums [should be let] in.

    Jon Bon Jovi’s twenty minute long speech was a gracious nod to the history of the band, with generous mentions of people along the way who paved the way to the Rock Hall honors.

    “I’ve been writing a speech like this since I first strummed a broom and sang from the top of the stairs of my childhood home,” said Bon Jovi from the stage. “I’ve written it many ways and many times. Some days, I write the ‘Thank you’ speech. Other days, I write the ‘F–k you’ speech. Writing it has been therapeutic in a lot of ways. I certainly see things differently tonight than I would have 10, 20, 30 years ago. In the end, it’s really all about time.”

    Each member of Bon Jovi took a moment at the microphone, with Alec John Such thanking Bon Jovi for his “vision,” and former guitarist Richie Sambora saying, “If I wrote a book, it would be [called] ‘The Best Time I Ever Had.’”

    Drummer Tico Torres thanked his mother, who supported his pursuit of music with words of advice: “Do what you want to do and play for your heart — just promise me you won’t get a tattoo.”

    Keyboardist David Bryan, whose time in the band also led to work on Broadway, said that being in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame made him “proud as hell. … We grew up as nobody but became somebody.”

    The band then took the stage for a lively four-song set that included, “You Give Love a Bad Name,” “It’s My Life,” “When We Were Us” from last year’s “This House Is Not for Sale” album, and “Livin’ on a Prayer.”

    Dire Straits bassist and co-founder John Illsley — who made a decision to induct the band itself — addressed singer Mark Knopfler’s absence, saying, “I can assure you, it’s for personal reasons, let’s just leave it at that. You’ve got to realize this is really more about a group of people more than one person. It’s a collective, a brotherhood, and that’s something that needs acknowledging tonight. … the many musicians who have worked with Dire Straits over the years and made the band’s success possible and led us all the way to Cleveland tonight.” Keyboardist Guy Fletcher made a few short remarks, noting that he never thought of Dire Straits as a “cool band.”

    Alabama Shakes singer Brittany Howard brought down the house inducting and honoring Sister Rosetta Tharpe, singing from the gut on “That’s All.” Backstage, Sambora embraced Howard, giving her a big hug and telling her that nobody else could have been a better pick.

    Speaking to Variety, Howard said she wishes more people knew about Tharpe, and suggested that her story is ripe for a movie.

    The Cars finished their road to the Rock and Roll Hall in epic fashion, with singer Ric Ocasek decked out in a glittery silver jacket and Flowers paying homage to the band (“You’ll never forget your first”) and referencing Phoebe Cates and her iconic pool scene in “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” to “Movin in Stereo.”

    Ironically, that afternoon was when the band decided to play that song, Greg Hawkes revealed to Variety in the press room. It got the hugest reaction of the set from the crowd, who were treated to “My Best Friend’s Girl,” “You Might Think,” and “Just What I Needed,” with Ocasek singing lead on the song, originally sung by Benjamin Orr. Weezer’s Scott Shriner filled in on bass.

    “When the band first started, Ben was supposed to be the lead singer and I was supposed to be the good-looking guy in the band — but after a couple of gigs, I kinda got demoted to the songwriter,” Ocasek said. “But obviously it’s hard not to notice that Benjamin Orr is not here. He would’ve been elated to be here on this stage. It still feels strange to be up here without him.”

    During the set, Bon Jovi drummer Torres was spotted peeking behind an amplifier to get a glimpse of David Robinson.

    Nina Simone’s younger brother Dr. Samuel Waymon and inductor Mary J. Blige gave beautiful speeches, with Blige saying Simone could “sing anything” and Waymon throwing down a gauntlet to other artists that if they are considering sampling his sister, “You better pay for it.”

    Simone’s tribute was perfection, with Andra Day taking the stage and the performance capped off by an absolutely gorgeous version of “Feeling Good,” delivered by Lauryn Hill.

    The tributes continued with Heart singer Ann Wilson and Alice in Chains guitarist Jerry Cantrell paying tribute to the late Chris Cornell with a moving cover of “Black Hole Sun.”

    The audience was then schooled in rock history when E Street Band guitarist and resident musicologist Steve Van Zandt took to the stage for a special presentation inducting “The Hall of Fame Singles,” a new category introduced this year. The inaugural inductees for 2018 are: “Rocket 88” by Jackie Breston and his Delta Cats (1951), Link Wray and his Ray Men’s “Rumble” (1958), “Louie Louie” by The Kingsmen (1963), Procol Harum’s “A Whiter Shade of Pale” (1967) and Steppenwolf’s “Born to Be Wild” (1968).

    The evening concluded with the induction of The Moody Blues. Wilson returned to the stage to tell of her personal relationship to the music of The Moodies, noting that they were not “cool or ironic.” Said Wilson: “The Moody Blues took me from childhood to adulthood as a disciple; their philosophical, spiritual, romantic and everyday messages were liberating and challenging to my then-forming mind. … The very few boys who took me on dates in those days were instantaneously upstaged if ‘Nights in White Satin’ or ‘Dawn Is a Feeling’ came on the car radio. And when ‘Legend of a Mind’ was played, the date was usually over because the awkward gropings of earthly boys didn’t seem to resonate like that astral plane.”

    She praised Justin Hayward, saying, “When I dreamed and began writing songs of my own, Justin Hayward’s work was my standard of beauty and purity. … The Moody Blues are as mind-blowing in concert as on record. They have sold 70 million albums and counting worldwide, and they have continued to do so without selling their creative soul for 54 years and counting. Tonight, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame finally honors what 70-plus million listeners and counting have known for over half a century.”

    The Moodies then took the stage to perform, “I’m Just a Singer in a Rock and Roll Band,” “Wildest Dreams,” “Nights in White Satin,” and “Ride My See Saw.”

    The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ceremony will air on HBO on May 5.

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    Default 2019 Nominees

    CLEVELAND (October 9, 2018)— The Nominees for induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2019 are:

    Def Leppard
    Devo
    Janet Jackson
    John Prine
    Kraftwerk
    LL Cool J
    MC5
    Radiohead
    Rage Against the Machine
    Roxy Music
    Rufus featuring Chaka Khan
    Stevie Nicks
    The Cure
    The Zombies
    Todd Rundgren

    To be eligible for nomination, an individual artist or band must have released its first commercial recording at least 25 years prior to the year of nomination. Six out of 15 of the Nominees are on the ballot for the first time, including: Def Leppard, Devo, John Prine, Roxy Music, Stevie Nicks, and Todd Rundgren.

    Inductees will be announced in December 2018. The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame 2019 Induction Ceremony, presented by Klipsch Audio, will be held at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York on March 29, 2019. Ticket on-sale information will be announced in January.

    Ballots will be sent to an international voting body of more than 1,000 artists, historians and members of the music industry. Factors such as an artist’s musical influence on other artists, length and depth of career and the body of work, innovation and superiority in style and technique are taken into consideration.

    The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame will again offer fans the opportunity to officially participate in the induction selection process. Beginning October 9 and continuing through 11:59 p.m. EST on December 9, 2018, fans can visit rockhall.com to cast votes for who they believe to be most deserving of induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. The top five artists, as selected by the public, will comprise a “fans’ ballot” that will be tallied along with the other ballots to choose the 2019 inductees. Fans will need to login to vote. Voting is capped at one ballot per day.

    Fans can also visit the Museum in Cleveland to cast their vote in person using the Voice Your Choice interactives adjacent to the 2018 Inductee exhibit in the new Hall of Fame Gallery, presented by KeyBank.

    HBO will also once again broadcast the ceremony in 2019 and SiriusXM will also carry a radio simulcast, along with specials leading up to the Ceremony devoted to the Rock Hall’s Inductees—past and present— on Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Radio (Ch. 310).

    A limited number of pre-sale tickets for the 2019 Induction Ceremony will be made available for Rock & Roll Hall of Fame donors and members in advance of the public sale. To be eligible for the member pre-sale opportunity, you must be an active Rock & Roll Hall of Fame member by December 31, 2018. Supporters of the Donor Circle by December 31, 2018 have the opportunity to access premium balcony tickets and VIP packages directly through Rock Hall staff and skip the member pre-sale. Join or renew your Rock Hall membership or donor status by December 31, 2018 to gain access to these opportunities. For more information on how to become a member, call the membership hotline at (216) 515-8425 or email membership@rockhall.org. For information on the Donor Circle, call (216) 515-1222 or email mischay@rockhall.org.

    Klipsch Audio, a leading global speaker and headphone manufacturer, is a strategic partner and presenting sponsor of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, its Induction Ceremony events and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame’s Main Stage. Klipsch’s renowned products deliver the power, detail and emotion of the live music experience throughout the iconic museum.

    Follow the Rock Hall on Facebook, Twitter (@rockhall) and Instagram (@rockhall) and join the conversation at #RockHall2019.

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    Default Re: WHO IS Visiting & WHAT IS Going On at the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame


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    Post Def Leppard’s Joe Elliott: Don’t Get Too Excited About Rock Hall

    by Matt Wardlaw December 6, 2018 Ultimate Classic Rock

    More than 3 million votes have been cast since fan voting for the class of 2019 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductees opened in October. Def Leppard and Stevie Nicks have consistently been in the lead, with the Sheffield hard rockers logging more than 500,000 votes.Still, singer Joe Elliott is cautiously reserved about all of it. “Let's not get too excited,” he tells UCR. “The nomination is one thing, being inducted is another.”

    As he notes, the fan vote is only one small part of the process, even if it has become an influential one over the years: The winner of every past fan vote has been inducted. “Essentially, it's worth one-thousandth of the entire vote, so it's not worth a great deal numerically speaking,” Elliott points out. “But I think the difference with the fan vote is the fact that everyday somebody's reported back who's top of the chart.”

    The way he sees it, the results make it hard for the main voters to ignore. “The other 999 have got no option but to take notice of it," he says.

    "Their management, their secretaries, their good selves are looking at this. Or they're getting involved in it in some form of social media every day that Def Leppard is at, they're No. 1 or if somebody else is catching 'em up on the outside. It's like a horse race. Well, they have to take notice of the vote, one way or another. They can either vote against it, out of principle, or they can say, ‘Well, okay, I get it. I think I have to say yes on this one.’”

    It means a lot to Elliott that fans now have a say in the process. “The people we always tried to get to from day one [are] the audience,” he says. “[Because] they’re actually involved in it, in one form or another, makes it more valid to us.” Still, he says it always comes down to the music for him.

    “I've never been one that's like, 'I have to have these Grammys on my shelf,' and all this kind of business, that's not why I did this,” he explains. “I wanted to try and write decent songs and sing them as well as I could, end of story. And come out and play them live in front of people. When we first got together as a band, it was because we'd been watching bands on Top of The Pops or The Old Grey Whistle Test or watching them live. It was what they did, it was their reaction with an audience.”
    Elliott says when he was growing up, it was a “fantastic” feeling to be in the crowd, “screaming for your favorite band,” and the idea of being on the other side of that and onstage, had an appeal that was impossible to escape.

    “It's such a cool thing to want to do, and that's all we really wanted,” he says. “The whole business side of it is something that we learned along the way, and this is part of it. You do these merry dances to get nominated for something, and we were like, ‘We don't want to do any merry dance, we either get nominated or we don't, but I'm not gonna get on my knees for it.' It's nice, and who wouldn't want to be in the same club as the Beatles and the [Rolling] Stones, and all that kind of stuff? But if we are, great. If we're not, then we're not.”

    But he doesn’t want his words and thoughts to be misconstrued. “It sometimes will come across reading that I'm negative toward it,” Elliott points out. “I'm not negative toward it. I'm just ambivalent. I'm neutral. I'm not gonna get excited about it, 'cause we're not in. We’re waiting to see.”

    One thing you can count on is if Def Leppard get inducted into the Hall of Fame, there'll be one more voice banging the drum for Ian Hunter to get some long overdue recognition. Elliott says "it's a crime" the Mott the Hoople frontman hasn't been inducted.

    “It's still amazing output, better than Bob Dylan, for my taste," he says. "The fact that it took 13 years to get us nominated is all well and good, the fact that it took Roxy Music 21 and Todd Rundgren probably 30 is ridiculous.

    "The whole thing is just subjective in the first place," he continues. "It's like, Who decides this? And that's why we've always been like, This is not public taste dictating how it should be. It's some invisible, Marvel Comics baddies or something. It's like some secret committee, and we don't know who they are. Mostly with bands like that, people like that, it just by nature, becomes elitist.”

    That's one of the reasons Elliott prefers to stay away from that scene. “All of a sudden, you get invited into the smoking lounge at some gentleman's club, and all of a sudden you feel like, 'Oh, I don't want to go back to sitting in McDonald's anymore. I want to be in this thing,'" he says. “I think there's a lot of people probably think that's what it's like. We don't really think that way, never did. It's great if we get in for the fans -- that's what it would be for. I suppose my mom would think it was cool.”

    For the moment, he’s looking forward to getting a small break after a year in which his band played to more than a million fans during a summer tour of stadiums and arenas with Journey. That run was just one part of the group’s busy recent schedule.
    “I think by the time Christmas comes, we’re going to want to put our feet up a little bit, because it’s been a hell of a run," Elliott concludes. "And for me personally, I’ve been promoting this thing since at least January, so it will be a full year of talking the walk and then performing it. So I’m going to want a bit of time with the kids and the wife and the mom and my friends and my record collection and my two cats and my bike.”

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    Post Janet Jackson, Stevie Nicks, Def Leppard join Rock Hall of Fame

    By David Bauder Dec. 13, 2018 PBS

    NEW YORK — Janet Jackson joins her brother Michael and the Jackson 5 as members of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, earning induction on Thursday along with Stevie Nicks and the top fan vote-getter, Def Leppard.

    Radiohead, the Cure, Roxy Music and the Zombies will also be ushered in next spring at the 34th induction ceremony. It will be held March 29 at Barclays Center in Brooklyn.

    Jackson’s induction comes after her third time as nominee and many saw it as overdue, given her prowess as a hitmaker with “All For You,” ”That’s the Way Love Goes,” ”Nasty,” ”Together Again” and “What Have You Done For Me Lately.”

    Her career has suffered from the fallout after the infamous 2004 Super Bowl appearance where her bare breast was briefly exposed. Jackson became eligible for the rock hall in 2007 and wasn’t nominated until 2016.

    The Roots’ Questlove, in a social media post earlier this year, said her exclusion had been “highly criminal.” He cited the influence of her 1986 album “Control,” which he said set off the New Jack Swing trend.

    “This was no one’s kid sister,” he wrote.

    Jackson said on Thursday: “Thank you Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. I am truly honored and I am happy to be in there with my brothers.”

    It will be Nicks’ second induction into the rock hall, since she’s already there as a member of Fleetwood Mac. She launched a solo career in 1981 with her duet with the late Tom Petty, “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around.” Other hits followed, including “Edge of Seventeen,” ”Stand Back” and “I Will Run to You.”

    Def Leppard earned more than half a million votes from fans, which are incorporated into more than 1,000 ballots from artists, historians, industry professionals and past winners in deciding who gets honored. The British heavy metal band with a pop sheen were huge sellers in the 1980s on the back of songs like “Photograph” and “Pour Some Sugar on Me.”

    Frontman Joe Elliott said he was initially ambivalent toward the honor until Jon Bon Jovi suggested it would change his life.
    “When I look at the list of who’s in, it’s just obvious you’d want to be in that club, isn’t it?” he told Billboard earlier this year. “When you think that every band that means anything in the world, starting from the Beatles and the Stones and any artist that influenced them — your Chuck Berrys, your Little Richards, etc., etc. — then of course you want to be in. Why wouldn’t you?”

    Def Leppard, Nicks and Roxy Music were voted in during their first years as nominees. Other 2019 nominees who didn’t make the cut included LL Cool J, Devo, Rage Against the Machine, MC5, John Prine, Todd Rundgren and Kraftwerk.

    There’s some question about whether Radiohead will shrug its collective shoulder as an inductees. The English band seemed like generic grunge rockers on their initial hit “Creep,” but with the album “OK Computer” and beyond have become consistent sonic pioneers. Among its rock hall class, Radiohead has the most impact on the current music scene.

    In an interview with Rolling Stone earlier this year, Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood said “I don’t care” when asked about the rock hall. Bandmate Ed O’Brien said, “culturally, I don’t understand it. I think it might be a quintessentially American thing.”

    The Cure and frontman Robert Smith resist their initial label as goth rockers, champions of fans who like black makeup, black clothes and darkly romantic songs. They have a durable catalog of hits, including “Friday I’m in Love,” ”Boys Don’t Cry,” ”Pictures of You” and “Let’s Go to Bed.”

    Roxy Music came out of the 1970s progressive rock scene and had hits with “Love is the Drug” and “More Than This.” Dapper member Bryan Ferry had a successful solo career and Brian Eno has been an influential producer.

    The heyday of British rockers the Zombies’ career was the 1960s, with big sellers “She’s Not There” and “Time of the Season.”
    The hall will announce ticket sales for March’s ceremony next month. HBO and SiriusXM will carry the event.

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    Post Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Announces Presenters for 2019 Induction Ceremony

    By Adam Weddle | March 13, 2019 | Paste

    The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has announced the presenters for this year’s induction ceremony. Each presenter will represent one of the seven inductees, with David Byrne presenting for Radiohead, Trent Reznor for The Cure, Janelle Monáe for Janet Jackson, Queen guitarist Brian May for Def Leppard, Harry Styles for Stevie Nicks, Susanna Hoffs of The Bangles for the Zombies, and John Taylor and Simon Le Bon of Duran Duran for Roxy Music.

    Roxy Music and Def Leppard were both first-time nominees this year, and Nicks received her first nomination as a solo artist (she was already inducted with Fleetwood Mac back in 1998). May was inducted into the Hall of Fame with Queen in 2001, and Byrne was inducted with Talking Heads the following year. Trent Reznor’s band Nine Inch Nails has been nominated twice, but never inducted. This year’s nominees also included Devo, Kraftwerk, LL Cool J, MC5, John Prine, Rage Against the Machine, Rufus ft. Chaka Khan and Todd Rundgren.

    The 34th Annual Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will return to the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Friday, March 29. As with previous years, the event will receive a television premiere on HBO. Learn more about this year’s inductees at the Rock Hall’s website and listen to a 1995 Radiohead performance from the Paste archives below.

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