Bear bile farms

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Scientist at centre of bear bile reports denies it’s a diabetes cure
15 November 2013
The scientist quoted in media coverage which claimed bear bile is a potential treatment for diabetes has made it clear his research should be used as strong evidence AGAINST bear bile use "for any purpose”.

Dr Gökhan Hotamısligil, geneticist at Harvard University School of Public Health and a co-author of the reported study, sought to correct reports in the National Geographic (“Bear Bile Could Stall Onset of Diabetes, Study Says”) and The Scientist: (“Bear Bile Prevents Diabetes in Mice”) by saying:

"It is important to clarify that our work has not used TUDCA which is based on bear bile. In fact, our work should be used as strong evidence against the use of bear bile for any purpose as it would not even be effective from a scientific and medical perspective. Furthermore, there is absolutely no basis for even considering the use of bear bile as the source for any treatment or procurement of bile acids since many alternative sources that does not involve this cruel approach exist."

The statement from Dr Hotamısligil follows another from Animals Asia yesterday, referring to concern over misrepresentation in reporting on tests that clearly had not been carried out using bear bile.

Animals Asia founder Jill Robinson said:

“We are indebted to Dr Hotamısligil for putting this matter straight and we are hopeful that these well-respected publications will be willing to make the required corrections. At a time when so much progress is being made to end the horrific practice of bear bile farming and to safeguard vulnerable species, the media must play its role in responsible reporting. In this instance there was never any suggestion from Harvard that bear bile had been used.”
 

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Animal Asia founder wins Hong Kong’s People’s Choice award
Animals Asia founder Jill Robinson has been named as the winner of the People’s Choice award at last night’s Spirit of Hong Kong Awards run by the South China Morning Post.

This morning Jill said:

“The award is doubly special – firstly because it’s a Hong Kong award and, as a Brit spending much of my time working in China, Hong Kong is home. Secondly because animal welfare is not always at the forefront of social responsibility and this shows that Hong Kong people are behind us and voting for what we do to help the animal species of China and Hong Kong.

“It’s another indicator that we are on the right track and enjoying broad support. Thank you so much to the SCMP, Sino Group, organisers and judges and to everyone who voted. It means the world to us - especially since the issue of bear bile farming was raised so much during the event last night and our campaign to end it is so clearly supported by the people of Hong Kong."

Read more about this special evening in Hong Kong here.

https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/me...kong’s-people’s-choice-award.html
 

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Christmas for moonbears


But some moonbears are still suffering in their small cages
 

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I hope their dream will become true this year
 

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Microsoft joins campaign to end bear bile farming in China
29 January 2014


Microsoft has joined the campaign to end bear bile farming with the development of an interactive website Exploring Moon Bears that explains the plight of China’s moon bears and the work of Animals Asia.

The IT giant donated its time and expertise to put together the site which is anticipated to be used by millions of school children across China. In addition, with an English language version now available, the site can be viewed and used throughout the world. The work showcases features from Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 11 but can work across all browsers and on PCs and tablets.

Strikingly different from traditional websites, Exploring Moon Bears is designed to look like three books which present the past and present of rescued moon bear Jasper and look at the 15 years of work by Animals Asia. With their colourful stories told through the technological advantages of IE11 - hardware acceleration, support for the latest web standards such as HTML5 and optimised touch support - the site showcases a smooth 3D bears experiences to users, which is made possible by the strong technical support of WebGL from IE11, and lets users immerse themselves in the moon bear stories.



Wei Qing, Microsoft Windows and Surface Business Group Lead , said:

“Microsoft is unwaveringly committed to charity development. We are more than pleased to collaborate with Animals Asia in co-launching the ‘Exploring Moon Bears’ website which fully leverages leading technology in IE11 and appeals to a larger audience to join and stop bear bile farming through a more vivid and interactive online experience.”

Microsoft’s support has been welcomed by Animals Asia whose founder and CEO Jill Robinson MBE said:

“If you want to reach the widest possible sector of the population then there is literally no one better to have on your side than Microsoft. We are bowled over by their support. From the outset their enthusiasm for the cause coupled with their immense creativity has impressed us all. We love what they did and now young people across China and the world can use this tool to learn about moon bears. Education is the key to changing the world and ensuring that people know the cruelty and illegality behind bile farming.”

Microsoft was introduced to Animals Asia by Logic Design who had worked with Animals Asia on its 15th anniversary celebrations in China. They were looking for a project to showcase Internet Explorer 11’s capabilities and were visibly moved by a visit to Animals Asia’s sanctuary in Chengdu, China where 140 bears rescued from China’s bear bile industry are currently being cared for.

Jill Robinson added:

“Jasper and the moon bears touched the collective hearts of Microsoft and now thanks to their incredible creativity and hard work they’ve reached millions more people across the world. We can’t thank Microsoft enough for their help. We are truly inspired by their contribution and commitment to ending bear bile farming.”
 

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It seemed so easy ..but how did he do it?
[video=youtube_share;--Si_7ozPJk]http://youtu.be/--Si_7ozPJk[/video]

So who is the King of the Swingers at Animals Asia’s China sanctuary?

Well, on this evidence, it's Kainara who's up first in this video showing a wonderfully relaxed swinging technique. Not so comfortable is Dick Bear who just can’t manage to make his swing work despite his best efforts.

The swings are a small part of an environment created to keep the bears active and stimulated. So do all bears love to swing?

Bear manager Heidi Quine explains:

“We go to great lengths at both our sanctuaries to ensure bears have enclosures which encourage natural behaviours such as playfulness. We provide swings and platforms, tyres and hammocks - all things designed to let our bears choose how they spend their days. Of course, like people, some bears are better when it comes to things like playing on swings than others. In fact some bears ignore the swings all together. It all comes down to giving the bears the opportunity to choose for themselves how they spend their days- something they were denied before rescue.”

Which only leaves us to add - have a swingingly good week!

In the link below you can see a moonbear mending the swing..at least he´s trying
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151755186351507.1073741877.7783116506&type=1
 

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Katie and Mac - moon bears who met through bars

In the first of a four-part series we look back to the New Year Rescue that took place early in January 2013 and track the progress of the six bears who joined us at our China sanctuary. In the year that followed their lives changed from painful daily extractions in tiny cages to rehabilitation and the start of new lives and friendships.

One year on from the New Year Rescue and with the six bears all enjoying sanctuary life – the experience and their careful handling has meant bonds have endured within the group.

Two such bears are Katie and Mac (known as Toby on arrival) who arrived in tiny bile cages from the same illegal farm.

They were transferred to larger recovery cages, close to each other, during their rehabilitation after both had damaged gall bladders removed and while vets worked on their smashed and rotten teeth.

The two bears were eventually properly introduced in dens and their laid back personalities clicked perfectly, despite Mac occasionally stealing Katie’s food.

Of the two it was Mac that took the first steps outside – peeping her nose out the door as Katie slept. Peering up at a sky she’d likely never seen before, grabbing a piece of fruit and bolting back into the den.

While the bond between Katie and Mac had been forged during their rehabilitation – it remained to be seen how both would fair meeting the other rescued bears in House 9, a dynamic that was already very much its own community.

Bear Manager Heidi Quine describes watching the pair come to terms with this latest change:

“They immediately enjoyed their new space but were slow to make new friends. They are both such laid back souls that they took integration entirely in their stride. For the most part the pair felt the new experience wasn’t quite worth interrupting a snooze for as if they were saying ‘Oh look, another bear. Must surely be time for another nap!’”

the two are yet to become the life and soul of the bear house then that’s entirely normal. They are still bears learning to be bears. To this end bear keepers even reported that the pair had to learn to eat browse – the delicious green leaves and branches that the bears are given daily.

Heidi added:

“Neither Katie nor Mac knew what to do with browse when it was offered to them. At first, they would either ignore it or give it a quick sniff. Only since watching the other bears eat it has Mac realised how delicious it is. Katie was a lot slower to catch on.”

Bear and Vet Team Director Nic Field added:

“Within the first week of arriving poor Mac had a gall bladder removed that was the size of a water melon. If people could have seen the diseased painful state then you would wonder why bear bile could ever be linked with promoting health. But the laid back nature of both these bears doesn’t obscure what fighters they both are.

“Years and years in tiny bear bile farm cages and now here they are, enjoying each other’s company and slowly adapting to their new lives. If the removal of pain was their first step in their rehabilitation – learning to be part of this community of bears is the last one. But, in the meantime, the bond built between the two will serve them well.”

https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/me...-and-mac-moon-bears-who-met-through-bars.html

There are pictures in the link
 

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Today (07/03/14), representatives of Animals Asia’s Vietnam Bear Rescue Centre (VBRC) are in Thanh Hoa Province, Vietnam rescuing two moon bears.

The male and female bears were originally confiscated in 2012 while being trafficked from Laos to Vietnam. Most likely they would either have been trafficked on to China or used in Vietnam’s own, illegal bear bile industry.
It’s also likely that their mother would have been killed by poachers.

Since then they have been cared for by Xuan Lien Nature Reserve with the assistance of the German Society for International Cooperation (GIZ) and Vietnam’s Forestry Protection Department (FPD).

Originally, these groups intended to return the cubs to the wild, but the ill-health of the male cub has forced a change of plans. Suffering from blindness due to cataracts, the decision has been made to house the pair in Animals Asia’s Vietnam Bear Rescue Centre (VBRC) in Tam Dao, Vinh Phuc province.
There the bears can be rehabilitated and be provided with on-going veterinary care.

The VBRC has a great deal of experience of dealing with special needs bears including blind bears. Following a medical evaluation in Thanh Hoa the bears will be transported 240 km via truck to the VBRC in Tam Dao and are expected to arrive late, local time, this evening.

Animals Asia Vietnam Director Tuan Bendixsen said:

“We are indebted to the Thanh Hoa Forestry Protection Department for their vigilance and to Xuan Lien nature reserve GIZ for their support of the cubs.
We look forward to giving these two young bears the care they deserve and ensuring they grow up in safe surroundings.
They will never suffer the cruelty of a bear bile farm
 

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Manuka : Shaking off the bile farm
18 February 2014
One year on from her rescue and Manuka has truly shaken off the horrors of the bear bile farm.

She arrived crammed into a tiny cage with her paws in terrible condition, with claws so overgrown they were puncturing her pads. She had not walked for years and with cracked, painful teeth she was a depressed bear with no appetite.

Manuka’s road to recovery has been an emotive one and, along the way, she has appeared to savour each moment of rehabilitation, whether it’s a bracing winter dip or the heart-stopping moments that saw her step out into the open air for the first time in years. Her first moon bear steps (below) had Animals Asia supporters from San Francisco to Shanghai dabbing their eyes.


Originally known as Buddha bear, which suited this charismatic soul, she was then re-named by comedian Arj Barker who was allowed to choose a permanent name after his barnstorming fundraiser in Australia. He opted for the equally sweet Manuka - thankfully rejecting the idea to name her after his comic creation, “Poopy”.

Once integrated, Manuka wasn’t too keen on making friends at first. Years on a bear bile farm had left her suspicious and unable to trust, preferring her own company. She continued to wander alone around the enclosure, hiding within that strikingly shaggy fur.

However, she loved swimming and the pool is where she made one of her biggest social breakthroughs. Back in October 2013, for the first time, Manuka swam with three other bears rather than alone - a heart-warming sign that had sanctuary staff believing she was finally on the road to recovery.

But it wasn’t until Manuka met Precious that her social life took a more unexpected turn.

After a few growls, the usually assertive Precious suddenly became extremely interested, if not obsessed, with the new arrival. Precious started following Manuka everywhere, as if protecting her from other bears. Even when Manuka took a nap in a basket, Precious would often lie underneath, keeping watch.

For a long time, Manuka stayed suspicious, but persistence finally paid off for Precious and, after months of following Manuka around, her friendship has finally been returned, with these best pals now sharing a basket at night.

An incredibly happy ending for a beautiful bear who has been through so much but is now enjoying each new experience.

And the bile farm? It’s been washed right out of that famously shaggy fur.

You can see pictures in the link
https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/media/news/news-archive/manuka-shaking-off-the-bile-farm.html
 

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Rescue ends bear bile farming in Binh Thuan

Nhan Dan Online/VNA – The Animals Asia Foundation (AAF) and authorised agencies of the central province of Binh Thuan rescued the locality’s last farmed bear, putting an end to bear bile farming in the province.

The owner voluntarily handed over the bear, which had been caged for 14 years, to the provincial Forest Protection Department .

With this rescue, Binh Thuan has become the second province, after Thua Thien – Hue, to end the exploitative practice.

AAF Vietnam Director Dr . Tuan Bendixsen said the owner’s action was indicative of the diminishing market for bear bile.

The 150kg animal is being sent to the Vietnam Bear Rescue Centre in the northern province of Vinh Phuc, where it will join 110 others.

http://www.vietnambreakingnews.com/2014/03/rescue-ends-bear-bile-farming-in-binh-thuan/#.UzIjca2Sw0o

It has been a dramatic rescue when the bear stopped breathing after receiving anesthesia.
But the vet knew what to do and saved the bear.

It´s a long way to his new home ,you can follow his journey here
Start read from the bottom
https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/me...escue-timeline-long-road-home-for-ti-map.html
 

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Happy news:)
[video=youtube_share;l56PmBnDFaw]http://youtu.be/l56PmBnDFaw[/video]

Bear farm to become a sanctuary with 130 bears rescued
15 April 2014
Animal welfare organisation Animals Asia will convert a bear bile farm in Nanning, China, into a sanctuary following an unprecedented request by the farm to rescue and care for its 130 bears.

From May 5, Animals Asia will take 28 of the sickest bears, 1,200km in a multi-vehicle convoy back to our existing sanctuary in Chengdu for urgent veterinary attention. Then Animals Asia will also take over the care of the bears on the Nanning bear farm and start the two-year process of turning it into a sanctuary.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPI4P3xMNYg#t=66

The move was instigated by Mr Yan Shaohong, General Manager of Flower World, which runs the bear farm as part of a wider state-invested horticultural business.

The initiative has been hailed as historic by Animals Asia CEO and founder Jill Robinson MBE, who sees it as a significant step in our ongoing campaign to end bear bile farming. She said:

“China has long been outraged by this cruel practice and our statistics show 87% of Chinese are against bear bile farming. This negotiation is a result of years of growing awareness and increased opposition, with the bear farmer showing the moral integrity to do the right thing. We believe it can be the start of a wider conversation, with all parties represented, with the aim of finally ending bear bile farming in China. We should never underestimate the importance of rescuing 130 bears, but we believe it can represent so much more than that.”

Mr Yan has described the decision to approach Animals Asia as one fuelled by the desire for the company to get out of the increasingly unpopular and ultimately unprofitable industry. He was also determined that the bears would not be sold onto other farms and continue to suffer cruelty.

He said:

“In the last two years, there has been a lot of discussion about the practice of extracting bear bile. After several rounds of discussion among the management team of Flower World, we reported the idea of conversion to our superiors and received their approval and support. We decided not to invest further in bear farming – it’s time for change.

“We figured out that selling bears directly to farms could return some of our investment but it wouldn’t be satisfying. Some of the bears here are sick, some had bile extracted previously and some are new-born cubs. If we only transfer those bears into another bear farm, the living condition of them still cannot be guaranteed. We had to find a good placement for those bears – a trustworthy partner with professional skills.

“We visited the Animals Asia’s China Bear Rescue Centre in Chengdu. The centre provides comfortable shelters and a living area simulating a natural environment for bears, where they can have abundant and delicious food, and clean and spacious dens. The animal welfare level in the centre for bears has confirmed our plan to work with Animals Asia. We believe the future for our bears would be improved by working with Animals Asia.”

The undertaking will mean a US$5m investment by Animals Asia – covering the initial rescue of 28 bears followed by the sanctuary conversion as well as budgeting for three years of bear care. Existing farm staff will continue to be employed and will work alongside Animals Asia employees and learn from their expertise.

Bear bile is used in traditional Chinese medicine with over 10,000 bears believed to be in farms in China suffering daily extractions in tiny cages and horrific conditions.

The bears at Nanning Bear farm have not had their bile extracted in over two years since Mr Yan decided to end the practice. However many still suffer health problems as a result of earlier extractions as well as issues due to their confinement in small cages, poor diets and lack of veterinary care.

To date Animals Asia has rescued 285 bears in China. This will be the biggest bear rescue ever attempted anywhere in the world. Animals Asia is the only organisation with a bear sanctuary in China.

Animals Asia China Director of External Affairs Toby Zhang said:

“We are opening the doors of a bile farm to the world. In doing so we are showing that a bile farm can close, be converted, and have a cruelty free future. We will be working with Mr Yan to investigate a sustainable model for what will become the Nanning Bear Rescue Centre – Animals Asia’s second sanctuary in China.

“Our research tells us that Chinese people do not want bear bile farming. We want those people to be heartened and inspired by this announcement. We want owners of Chinese bile farms to view it positively too. We want them to pursue their own way out.

“As we enter into this agreement with a state-invested business we also welcome the opportunity to work with government to seek solutions. We are not saying this is a one-size-fits-all solution. What we are saying is – if we can reach this agreement and deliver on this massive undertaking then we should all be inspired by the possibilities.”
 

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They show they have feelings

Peter and Shamrock’s mixed reaction to new friends
23 May 2014

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Inseparable moon bears Peter and Shamrock have welcomed new friends into their lives, but one of them is finding it difficult to share.

The moon bear duo spent most of their lives cramped in tiny cages a few meters from each other before being rescued in Animals Asia’s New Year Rescue 2013. Post rescue, Peter and Shamrock were integrated together and formed a tight bond in a private enclosure.

Now they’ve finally been integrated with the other bears in the CBRC's house 7, and while they are certainly enjoying their more spacious surroundings, Shamrock remains very jealous of any attention that Peter receives.

Staff handled their integration delicately as both bears – particularly Shamrock – have been food obsessed. With this in mind, integration was delayed till after both autumn, when hunger drives increase, and the winter dormancy period.

Animals Asia Bear and Vet Team Director China, Nic Field said:

“As with all new introductions we introduced one bear at a time over several weeks, beginning with the friendliest in the group. Jonah was first and he and Peter were very curious about each other, however Shamrock was very obsessive over Peter and did not want to share him, showing her emotions with a lot of vocalising.”

As the Chengdu sanctuary bear team persevered introducing new bears, Shamrock continued to respond with loud calls and occasionally aggressive behavior. Peter on the other hand was cautiously curious about his new companions and when given the opportunity would exchange sniffs with each of them.

Nic Field said:

“Shamrock was a concern in the first few weeks with her constant vocalizing. Thankfully she gradually got calmer with each passing day and has enjoyed the entire enclosure including splashing with delight in the pool. It’s not a happy ending yet – she still isn’t getting along with Chica and Jonah, but she is adjusting. Peter has been great, a little nervous understandably, but he is gaining confidence and has enjoyed some playful wrestling with Jonah and Teddy.”

“As the enclosures get greener and the bears’ activity continues to increase we’re all looking forward to seeing both Peter and Shamrock venturing further and further afield, exploring what their big enclosure and new friends can offer them.”

https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/me...shamrock’s-mixed-reaction-to-new-friends.html
 

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Starry, starry night
04 June 2014, 18:00PM

It’s just a few weeks until I will be in the UK and meeting our amazing supporters – old friends and hopefully new friends too. The main event, a Starry Night for the Moon Bears on Thursday 19 June 2014 (Gilgamesh Restaurant, Camden, London NW1 8AH) is shaping up to be a very exciting and entertaining evening.

Our lovely supporter Lesley Nicol (Downton Abbey’s Mrs Patmore) has worked her socks off to make sure this will be a night to remember! Lesley and, all subject to availability (and final confirmation), quite a few other members of the Downton cast will be attending. Including Michelle Dockery who play Lady Mary, Phyllis Logan (Mrs Hughes) and Allen Leech (Branson) who will be providing the cabaret and possibly other stars such as Sophie McShera who plays Daisy, thrilled to be seeing our Animals Asia UK ambassador and actor Peter Egan again, who will also conduct an auction, including celebratory items from Manchester United, a special painting by Pam Ayres MBE and a highly collectable bear sculpture.

Writing this blog from Nanning where we’re conducting health checks this week on bears at a bile farm (that we’re also converting in to a sanctuary), and looking forward to catching you up on all our recent news too.

Places are limited and tickets are £80 (including a welcome drink and ½ bottle of wine) for a delicious two-course vegetarian/vegan dinner by award winning chef Ian Pengelley.

I hope you can join me as I hear from Lesley that the entertainment is going to be very special indeed – fun and poignant all in one - and if you haven’t already, please book your tickets now by calling our UK office on 01579 347148.

Soon after this event there will be a fantastic guided walk about the Animal History of the St James’ Park area on Sunday 22 June at 3pm. I attended this walk last year and it was great fun and very surprising to find out more about which members of the Royal Family were true animal lovers, along with seeing the current and lively pelican inhabitants of the park. It really illustrated the role horses, dogs, cats, even elephants and giraffes have played in British history through the centuries and puts into perspective how quickly China is changing in its attitudes to non human animals.

This year, the walk is dedicated to Eddie, my special friend and our Dr Dog Ambassador who passed away in May, but did so much to show how dogs are our loving friends and helpers during his fourteen happy years.

Restricted to just 20 people (no children under 10) and must be booked in advance. Price £25. To book your place, please call 01579 347148.

https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/social/jills-blog/2014/06/04/starry-starry-night/

I don´t watch tv that often and haven´t seen Downton Abbey but I think this event sounds fun and I can have veganfood too by an awardwinning chef
Guided tour about animal history in James Park seems interesting too.
I would love to go there if I lived closer
 

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Hello Kitty joins the fight to end bear bile farming
13 June 2014

From May until the end of the year,Hello Kitty’s eight-city anniversary tour will bring the fight against bear bile farming to a whole new audience in China as Animals Asia mascot moon bear Moonie shares the stage with the iconic Hello Kitty.

The tour’s first stop was Shanghai’s Global Harbor Mall where TV host Wu Xin called on the audience to protect their country’s moon bears.

On May 31, Wu Xin – who hosts wildly popular TV show Happy Camp – was joined on stage by Animals Asia’s Director of External Affairs, Toby Zhang who was given the opportunity to present Animals Asia’s efforts to end bear bile farming to the attending public and media.

Toby Zhang said:

“It was a pleasure to attend the event in Shanghai, which was really well organised. The audience was fantastic and I’m sure many of them have been moved by hearing the realities of bear bile farming.”

Hello Kitty brand manager Cherry Zhang also designed “Love Kitty – Love Moonie” T-shirts that are available to buy directly at the roadshows.

As the exhibition travels throughout the country, additional celebrity designed Moonie products will become available with all income kindly donated to Animals Asia.

So far actress Jiang Yiyan and TV host Wu Xin have also designed limited edition T-shirts for Animals Asia, with other stars expected to follow suit.

Animals Asia founder and CEO Jill Robinson MBE said:

“We can’t thank Hello Kitty enough for choosing to partner with Animals Asia at these prestigious events. The Hello Kitty brand is huge all over Asia so to see Moonie alongside Hello Kitty is a dream come true for us and has brought our message to a whole new audience. And I’m sure that the fantastic T-shirt designs and other merchandise will continue to benefit us in the future – I want one!”
https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/me...joins-the-fight-to-end-bear-bile-farming.html
 

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Why Smudge needs love
25 June 2014
Taken from her mother at birth and now the only cub on Nanning Bear Farm, gorgeous little Smudge is in desperate need of tender loving care and great big dollops of quality time.

Moon bear cubs in the wild are lovingly nurtured by their mothers until around 18 months and are often born as twins or triplets. They are very playful at this age, exploring and wrestling with their siblings for hours on end – a vital part of physical and psychological development.

During this first year and a half of life, a bear cub’s mother is their safe haven offering protection and guidance. Cubs are all but defenceless at this stage and can become very stressed and even cry if their mother isn’t around to comfort them.

Smudge, however, was born to breeding bears at Nanning Bear Farm with no records existing as to who her mother is.

In order to give her the best possible care, staff at Animals Asia China have turned to colleagues in Vietnam – who have extensive cub experience – to find out how best to raise poor Smudge.

[video=youtube_share;OBJSQIdMW1Y]http://youtu.be/OBJSQIdMW1Y[/video]

Animals Asia Bear & Vet Team Director for Vietnam, Annemarie Weegenaar was on hand to give advice, saying:

“As Smudge is a cub on her own, and there are no other cubs at Nanning, the best our bear team can do is offer Smudge some social time. Time for her to play, for her to be comforted and time to simply not be on her own.”

However socialising with a moon bear takes a little bit of guidance.

Annemarie said:

“They tend to actually dislike very much to being up in the air with their legs dangling around, so we don’t advocate picking up and physically hugging the bear. It’s best to either sit on the floor with the cub, with toys in hand to encourage play, or sit on a structure where the cub can join you for some social time.”

And as the cubs do grow, they also become naturally more independent. Just as when they are raised by their mother, moon bear juveniles start to show less interest in their carers, and are more interested in doing their own thing.

Heidi Quine, Animals Asia’s Senior Bear Manager in Nanning said:

“Ultimately we hope that when Smudge is old enough she’ll be able to meet other bears in Nanning and – when the time is right – be integrated into a group and make her own bear friends.”

Animals Asia founder and CEO, Jill Robinson MBE said:

“The sad news is that as long as there is demand for bear bile in Vietnam and China, there will be no safe place in these countries to release moon bears. As Smudge can’t be released and her mother can’t be found, it’s important that someone fills the void. There are plenty of experts, including author Else Poulsen who advocate mimicking the behaviour of the mother toward the cub. It’s not ideal, but it is a way to give Smudge a loving start in a terrible situation. On the plus side, however, as Smudge continues to grow, new enclosures will grow around her and she’ll be able to enjoy sunshine, open spaces and eventual integration with new bear friends.”

https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/media/news/news-archive/why-smudge-needs-love.html
 

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Sweet little Layla rescued from wildlife trafficking
[video=youtube_share;Cv0RaB9uB_4]http://youtu.be/Cv0RaB9uB_4[/video]

She´s lonely but she will meet other sunbears after she has been in quarantine long enough.
I wonder if she misses her mother..
 

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Animals Asia has welcomed news that China’s largest bear bile pharmaceutical company is now pursuing research on synthetic alternatives.

KaiBao Pharmaceutical is a cornerstone of the bear bile industry. In 2012 it bought 18 tonnes of bear bile powder for use in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and continues to be the major outlet for industrial bear bile farms.

The company’s project “Key Technology and Clinical Research of Developing Bear Bile Powder in Vitro” has gained support from the State Ministry of Science and Technology in its five-year plan entitled: “Key Technology and Clinical Research of Developing Bear Bile Powder”.

KaiBao states:

“The project aims to develop a synthetic bear bile bioequivalent in terms of chemical composition by using poultry bile and biotransformation technology and gaining the independent intellectual property rights. The project will benefit the protection and sustainable using of endangered medicinal animal resources and provide raw materials with stable and controllable quality for developing new drugs and bear bile powder products. These are of great significance for the history and development of traditional Chinese medicine.”

This groundbreaking research will be significant in demonstrating alternative thinking within the traditional Chinese medicine industry and its use of wild animal body parts as medicinal raw materials.

The advent and promotion of synthetic alternatives will benefit both animals and the Chinese medicine industry and ease public concern regarding the ethical use of threatened species within Chinese pharmacopoeia.

Animals Asia founder Jill Robinson said:

“We welcome this decision and are in support of such measures that will replace bear bile with a synthetic alternative. Such a step forward is good news for the pharmaceuticals, for those who practice TCM, and for customers too. We applaud the official backing of this research and believe it is good news for the bears and the millions of people who have campaigned for their freedom.”

Animals Asia has a sanctuary in Chengdu, China and Tam Dao, Vietnam. It also recently announced the conversion to a sanctuary of a bear bile farm in Nanning housing 130 bears. Dubbed the Peace by Piece rescue – the aim was to show that as demand for bear bile decreases – the farmers and their bears can be part of a solution based strategy to end bear bile farming once and for all.

Including the Nanning project, Animals Asia has rescued over 500 bears, mainly moon bears, from the bear bile industry.

NOTE: We note that synthetic bear bile is also still an animal product – albeit a byproduct of a wider industry. It remains an ethical dilemma and the debate surrounding the use of all animal products continues and remains entirely worthwhile. From the point of view of ending bear bile farming, and drastically reducing suffering of animals caged and mutilated for anything up to 30 years of their lives, this is a huge step. In the meantime, the battle to improve the lives of all animals, including those suffering under intensive farming conditions, goes on.


https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/me...bile-plan-could-end-demand-for-bear-bile.html
 

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Report: Farmed bears aren’t farmed - they’re trafficked
22 August 2014
A key report from wildlife trade monitors, TRAFFIC, has outlined the extent of bear trafficking in Asia – a situation worsened by the existence of bear bile farms.
The report, funded by funds entrusted to Animals Asia by The Myer Foundation and the estate of Elsie Quinn, is based on research into 12 years of activity across 17 countries, representing almost 700 seizures, accounting for 2,801 bears.
Among the findings is the fact that bear bile farms, that were once thought would stop bears being taken from the wild, has instead boosted trafficking and markets for bile products.

Brought to Bear: an Analysis of Seizures across Asia (2000–2011) states:
“The production of bile in farms increases the availability of bear bile and intensifies consumer demand.
The supply pressure for facilities to stock adequate numbers of bears to meet demand for bile extraction subsequently drives the poaching of bears from the wild. Proponents of ‘bear farming’ claim it alleviates pressure on wild bear populations although there has been no conclusive evidence supporting the efficacy of ‘bear farming’ and no identified beneficial effect on wild populations. Furthermore, this terminology is potentially misleading because ‘farming’ typically insinuates practices where animals are bred in captivity.”
It continues:
Given that bears are essentially not bred in captivity and that bear bile extraction facilities mostly source their animals from the wild, the notion of sustainably ‘farming’ bears to supply bile and bear parts is highly flawed.

It is suspected that in border provinces where a greater number of live bears were seized (such as in Cambodia; 156, Lao PDR; 26 and Thailand; 15) were potentially en-route to bear bile extraction facilities in Vietnam and China.”

https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/me...d-bears-aren’t-farmed-they’re-trafficked.html
 

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Vietnam's Halong Bay unites against bear bile

Animals Asia’s push to purge Vietnam’s iconic Halong Bay of the blight of bear bile farming is receiving unprecedented support from government, media, locals and tourists.

Despite it’s illegality, bear bile farming persists in Quang Ninh province, the home of UNESCO World Heritage site Halong Bay.

This year, campaigns running during peak tourist seasons, have been joined by all levels of provincial government – a positive sign authorities are committing to working together to eliminate bear bile farming in the area.

Together, Animals Asia and Forest Protection Department (FPD) staff distributed 12,000 awareness-raising brochures directly into the hands of tourists and locals.

Around Halong City, and pivotally in Bai Chay Wharf, where over 5,000 tourists board boats to visit the bay every day, authorities gave permission, for the first time, for anti-bear bile farming banners to be displayed free of charge.

In the biggest show of unity so far in the province, government representatives from the Quang Ninh FPD, Halong City Police, the Quang Ninh Department of Culture & tourism, Quang Ninh's International Relations Department, Halong City, and the Bay Chay Wharf Authority all publically signed Animals Asia’s pledge board on Bai Chay Wharf vowing to protect bears and reject bear bile products.



Locally media were quick to back the campaign with Quang Ninh TV reporting on the progress on the provinicial prime time news. Local newspapers also carried the story.

Animals Asia’s Vietnam Director Tuan Bendixsen said:

“We’ve been working closely with all these entities for a number of years now, but the unity this year has really been exciting. Numerous government departments, the local people, the media and the tourists have all contributed to raising awareness on the issue and have proudly pledged to reject this cruel industry.”
“However, some reports have perhaps been overly optimistic about the situation. Claims that only two or three farms remain in the province and that the industry can be eradicated by the end of the year don’t tally with our observations.”

It’s believed there are still over 100 bears languishing on farms in Quang Ninh – with the two largest farms holding a combined 78 bears. These establishments continue to avoid prosecution by exploiting legal loopholes such as claiming bears are pets.
https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/me...nams-halong-bay-unites-against-bear-bile.html
 

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Stolen Lives: Animals Captured in the Wild
02 October 2014

Animals Asia's Animal Welfare Director, Dave Neale, explains the dark secret behind the façade of the modern zoo and their well-stocked populations of chimpanzees, elephants, beluga whales and dolphins.

I am just a few months old when I hear them coming, my mother ushers me towards her and we begin to run. But we are not fast enough to outrun their bullets. I watch as my mother and the rest of my family drop to the ground. I am now left alone with the bodies of my loved ones lying motionless before me. A net is thrown over me and I am dragged into the darkness. I am just a baby.

This is my own 'anthropogenic' interpretation of what an elephant calf is likely to experience as their family is killed and (s)he is ripped from a life in the wild to be supplied to a zoo thousands of miles away.
This situation is all too real for many thousands of animals, and each and every time I think about this I despair at how any member of my own species can convince themselves that this is an acceptable scenario to be a part of.

How can anybody support the removal of an individual from their mother and family, and to ship this individual off for a life in captivity with the associated loss of freedom?

This situation deeply troubles me, despite our regularly touted "level of intellect" as a species –apparently above and beyond that of any other – individuals continue to use their "superior" cognitive abilities to justify these actions on the basis of their own income generation.
Placing their own wishes and desires to have what they wish, above that of the right of an individual to live the life they were born to live.
Animals such as chimpanzees, orang-utans, gorillas, elephants, whales and dolphins are in high demand to supply both government run zoos/ocean parks and private collections. This demand is leading to unimaginable suffering for many thousands of individual animals.

Let's take chimpanzees as an example. To obtain one infant chimpanzee from the wild, it is estimated that an additional ten chimpanzees are likely to be killed. Many of these adults are likely to be slaughtered whilst defending their infants from the poachers, the animals left behind are likely to experience a significant amount of fear and distress due to the experience they have been involved in and witnessed. The suffering for the infants is unimaginable, they have to deal with the stress of losing their loved ones only to be thrust into the hands of people that care very little for their overall health and welfare. They are then shipped to a strange land to be placed into a barren enclosure and in many cases beaten into performing tricks as part of an animal circus.

When I see these animals (chimpanzees, elephants, beluga whales, dolphins, etc.) languishing in barren zoo enclosures or swimming round and round in circles in swimming pools which are a tiny fraction of the size of their ocean environments, I am ashamed.
I feel that they must be looking at me and asking, "Why? What did I do to deserve this lifestyle? Why was I chosen to be a part of this absurd and often abusive life? And where is my mother and my family?"
It is time for us all to take a stand on behalf of these animals and demand an end to wild capture. Animals born wild have the right to live in the wild where they belong and it is our duty to protect them and their environment to ensure they can live as it is intended for them to do so, and not to live a life of captive misery.


https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/me...tolen-lives-animals-captured-in-the-wild.html

TAKE THE PLEDGE BELOW TO HELP END BEAR BILE FARMING
I believe a bear should have the freedom to shit in the woods, and not spend their lives caged for bile extraction.
http://www.bearinthewoods.org/
 

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The lessons I learnt from a moon bear
With the recent sad passing of moon bear Hebe, Animals Asia Vet Emily Drayton was inspired to write the many lessons she learned from Hebe.
I think many of us who work with animals can appreciate there is much we have to learn from other species. There are certain things animals do so well where we humans fail miserably.
Fortunately, every now and then we get to meet another living being who reminds us of the things we have forgotten and teach us a better way of being. Hebe was one of those special animals.
I first met Hebe the day her best friend Melody passed. I watched Hebe sit beside the den door, comforting her friend as she slowly succumbed to the anaesthetic. It was my first day at CBRC, and I knew little about moon bears, but Hebe showed me something about friendship that day. She showed me the value of companionship and the importance of being a friend through the good times and the bad. It was the first of many lessons I would learn from Hebe.

Hebe has given me much joy and pain. She has taught me so much about being a vet, but more importantly, about being a good person and will forever occupy a special place in my heart. Here are just some of the lessons Hebe has been kind enough to teach me.

1. When it comes to things you love, take your time, be slow and considerate. A spoonful of peanut butter should never be rushed.
2. Stubbornness can be an admirable quality.
3. When the teenagers next door are being rowdy make your disapproval known.
4. Bad hair days happen. In fact bad hair months happen. But it doesn't matter. Those who love you will think you are beautiful no matter how fuzzy your hair.
5. Good health should never be taken for granted.
6. Live in this moment. Don't dwell in yesterday or worry about tomorrow. Just be here, now.
7. Strength is not borne from muscle or confined to the physical body. It arises from the spirit and in Hebe's case, it is limitless.
8. People can be cruel, they will hurt and abuse for no real reason. But people can also be kind, capable of love, respect and compassion. These things are not mutually exclusive - a person who commits an act of cruelty, is also capable of love.
For this reason we should always strive to be kinder, to love more fiercely and to be a better person whenever we can. In doing so, we can inspire goodness in others.
9. It does not matter how strong the spirit, time will wear us all down.
10. Some days you will fail. It does not matter how hard you want to make things better, there are some things that you cannot fix.
11. Bravery is not the measure of how fiercely you fight, but how graciously you surrender.
12. Forgiveness. Forgive those who hurt you, and most importantly learn to forgive yourself.

I will be forever grateful for knowing Hebe. Rest in peace sweet bear, and thank you for all you have given me.
https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/me...n-bear-by-animals-asia-vet-emily-drayton.html
 

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They did this when they had a break from filming another episod of Downtown Abbey
 

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RIP Oliver – the bear who inspired a movement

Oliver, a bear who survived 30 years in a Chinese bear bile farm cage before being dramatically rescued, has died at Animals Asia's Chengdu Bear Rescue Centre.
Oliver had spent four and a half happy years at the sanctuary. On Wednesday, following a gradual deterioration in his condition, in conjunction with team discussions, vets took the decision to euthanise him. The surgery was full with staff who had rescued and cared for him, all saying their goodbyes.
His rescue in 2010 from a bear farm in Shandong was captured in the movie "Cages of Shame". During the 1,500km journey home, he required life-saving surgery on the roadside. International vets received support and help from a local hospital and police which was integral to Oliver's survival. His desire to make the best of his sanctuary years further moved campaigners for whom he became an inspiration.
Brown bears are only expected to live around 30 years and Oliver had spent that time in a cage. Yet he was determined to enjoy his borrowed years out on the grass in the sunshine at Animals Asia's sanctuary.

[video=youtube_share;Me2Ezr4QygU]http://youtu.be/Me2Ezr4QygU[/video]

"Cages of Shame" continues to be shown to animal lovers in towns and cities across the world.
Animals Asia founder and CEO, Jill Robinson MBE said:
"In 2010, we found Oliver as a broken bear. His body conformation and legs were misshapen by years of being crushed in a cage and it was feared he would not survive the 1,500 mile journey home."
When Oliver's condition began to deteriorate – panting heavily and refusing to eat –Animals Asia vets decided that only an emergency operation would save his life.
Jill Robinson said:
"He was an old bear who had suffered more than anyone can imagine but it just didn't seem right that he could be so close to freedom and not make it."
Under local police escort, the convoy of trucks headed to a nearby provincial hospital to borrow a bottle of oxygen needed for the anaesthetic. After four hours of intense surgery surrounded by huge crowds of concerned onlookers, Oliver's diseased gall bladder was removed along with a crude and painful metal coil that had been inserted into his abdomen by his captors to fasten the gall bladder to the abdominal wall. The following day he would reach his sanctuary.

He brought so many people together that day – from Shandong to Chengdu and across the country– and he's continued to do so ever since. As an old bear who refused to give up, his fight inspired ours. His story has continued to be told across the world and has raised increasing awareness of the horrors of bear bile farming. Our broken bear turned teacher, his stoic, gentle nature will continue to inspire the rescue of so many more.
Animals Asia's China Bear and Vet Team Director, Nic Field said:
"Oliver's story is so powerful, he became a focal point of the growing support of our work in China. To so many, he represents the suffering of the thousands of bears still languishing on China's bear farms. More importantly he has been a symbol of hope. Every visitor to the sanctuary and every supporter around the world knows Oliver's story. I am quite sure his legacy will live on.
"The entire team were devastated at his passing and he will be sorely missed. There is comfort in knowing that collectively we were able to give him more than four years of freedom. Despite everything he had been through, Oliver's forgiving and spirited nature touched all that met him."
https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/me...liver-–-the-bear-who-inspired-a-movement.html
 

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i´m going a little off topic this is not about bear bile farms and bears caged for their bile.
But the bears are abused and forced to dance..
It´s about the last dancingbears in India..I doubt it´s the last dancingbears in the world.

[video=youtube_share;yZsTO8QBDyw]http://youtu.be/yZsTO8QBDyw[/video]
 

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10 tips for a cruelty free festive period
We sent out an "all staff" Animals Asia email – "What are your tips for a cruelty free Christmas?"
We're delighted to share the response…


1/ Choose a vegan-friendly Christmas pudding
The most amazing vegan Christmas puddings can easily be found in supermarkets and vegan shops – and you really can't tell the difference between these and the traditional Xmas puds that contain animal fats. Animals Asia founder and CEO, Jill Robinson says, "these are even yummier if you add lashings of Alpro's vegan-friendly cream. Soak it in Cointreau for the full festive feel."

2/ Give an animal a gift
Animals Asia Senior Bear Manager Heidi Quine suggests that this festive season you turn the tables and give an animal a gift. "Pledge to do meat-free Mondays all next year or vow to switch to free range eggs, or sponsor a rescued animal – there are countless ways you can give a little, but make a big difference in the lives of animals."

3/ Research your ethical gifts thoroughly
Ethical gifts are a great idea for loved ones during the festive season, but make sure you research the gift thoroughly. Gifting animals isn't as straightforward as it sounds. There is increased opposition to giving livestock to poor communities in developing countries. Research your gift well, and make sure your contribution makes a difference.

4/ Support those who support animals
Vegantown in the UK sell the most amazing vegan chocolate online – including Italian truffle chocolate, gourmet French pralines, rum truffles and a whole host of amazing sweets - AND they deliver abroad, AND they give a percentage of profits to two charities, one of which is Animals Asia!

5/ Animals are for life, not just for Christmas
An oldie but a goodie. Whether it is a dog, cat, rabbit or any other sentient animal, please, please, please think twice before giving an animal as a present. If you're not sure that the recipient can care for the animal for the rest of its natural life, then there are better presents out there for your loved one.

6/ Don't assume fur is fake
You'd think you'd be safe buying fake fur but think again. Even fur labelled as fake can prove to be the real thing, with fur being sourced from dogs and cats. Best off avoiding fur altogether – fake or otherwise – it looks best on animals.

7/ Buy with the bunny logo
Cosmetics are great gifts, but not all of them are cruelty-free. If you don't want to give gifts that were tested on animals, make sure your cosmetics have the leaping bunny logo indicating that they were made without cruelty.

8/ Swap turkey for faux-turkey
Faux-turkey is a really tasty feel-good alternative to real turkey. Tofurky, Field Roast, Vegan Whole Turkey, and Gardein make delicious vegan alternatives to the traditional roast.

9/ Stuff yourself – not an animal
There are loads of vegetarian stuffings out there and many of the most common are also vegan. The ever-present Paxo versions for example will go down well with vegan guests and can even be spiced up with fried onions, mushrooms or cranberries. These stuffings are super festive, yummy and won't harm a soul. A bonus tip – some Bisto gravy granules are actually vegan too.

10/ Buy a virtual gift for the bears as a present for your nearest and dearest
Animals Asia cares for over 300 bears at their three sanctuaries in China and Vietnam. These animals have been rescued from the barbaric bile trade and many suffer from long-term physical and mental conditions. Having endured years of cruelty at the hands of humans, these beautiful animals absolutely deserve some love during the holiday season. From fruit baskets to a new swing there are a number of gifts available that will help enrich these animals' lives.

https://www.animalsasia.org/intl/me...0-tips-for-a-cruelty-free-festive-period.html
 
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