Do You Like Morphine?

Do You Like Morphine


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SarahJ

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I love Morphine. There's so much going on in that song. To me it not just about the allure of the drug but the addiction to fame and money of those around him. Shows just how aware he was of peoples motivations.
 

MJBad25

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That is my favorite song from Blood On The Dance Floor. It is kind of creepy in a way. It's creepy to me because the man is hooked on Demerol and needs it more and more each day. Which is how Michael was with propofol because of his doctors.
 

IMWhizzle

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That is my favorite song from Blood On The Dance Floor. It is kind of creepy in a way. It's creepy to me because the man is hooked on Demerol and needs it more and more each day. Which is how Michael was with propofol because of his doctors.

Hard to imagine. I think he was referring to his feelings and his painkiller 'addiction' back in 1993.
 

innuendo141

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Jesus, I remember as a kid thinking the lyrics were

"Debbie Rowe, Debbie Rowe, oh god he's dating Debbie Rowe....."
 

KOPV

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I've always liked the contrast from hard hitting vocals (and sounds) to smooth soothing!
 

Daryll748

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I voted for 'I love it' :clapping:

I love the contrast between the slow soothing part and the screaming lyrics. :blush:

Its like a 'Morning' song. Listen to that and you're instantly awake LOL :D

No seriously, I love it as it does handle a 'touchy' subject of the use of Pain medication :unsure:
Once, you have been there, it does struck a cord within you!
 

AlwaysThere

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It's absolutely excellent. One of his most impressive artistic triumphs.
 

Antwort

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It's absolutely excellent. One of his most impressive artistic triumphs.

Most definitely so. It's a raw, honest and deeply personal piece = art at its very best. Masterpieces such as Morphine demonstrate Michael's true depth as an artist which goes well beyond entertainment. His popularity and the visual elements of some of his songs, as well as the dance routines have managed to overshadow his brilliant and raw songwriting.

I may have said this before, but I think it begs repeating - Billie Jean, Beat it & Speed demon are entertainment, Morphine, Little Susie, Earth Song and soooo many others are art. Don't mean to sound terribly elitist and consider art only those elements which deal with dark, somber matters. After all, life is far too serious and dreadful an affair to focus only on its dark parts. Levity and entertainment are always needed, but there is indeed something very special about an artist's ability to express all variables of human emotion (including the less pleasant ones). And when you combine that simple humanity and empathy with the courage to expose one's very own weaknesses, angst and fears it's even greater an achievement. That raw sincerity is most appealing to me and to many other art lovers, I'm sure. Michael manages to do all of that brilliantly in Morphine. Definitely one of the hidden gems in his catalog, sadly overlooked by the general public and music "connoisseurs".

Great thread btw and some really brilliant and insightful posts. I'm amazed I've missed it initially, thanks for bringin' it back up :)
 
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Daryll748

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Most definitely so. It's a raw, honest and deeply personal piece = art at its very best. Masterpieces such as Morphine demonstrate Michael's true depth as an artist which goes well beyond entertainment. His popularity and the visual elements of some of his songs, as well as the dance routines have managed to overshadow his brilliant and raw songwriting.

I may have said this before, but I think it begs repeating - Billie Jean, Beat it & Speed demon are entertainment, Morphine, Little Susie, Earth Song and soooo many others are art. Don't mean to sound terribly elitist and consider art only those elements which deal with dark, somber matters. After all, life is far too serious and dreadful an affair to focus only on its dark parts. Levity and entertainment are always needed, but there is indeed something very special about an artist's ability to express all variables of human emotion (including the less pleasant ones). And when you combine that simple humanity and empathy with the courage to expose one's very own weaknesses, angst and fears it's even greater an achievement. That raw sincerity is most appealing to me and to many other art lovers, I'm sure. Michael manages to do all of that brilliantly in Morphine. Definitely one of the hidden gems in his catalog, sadly overlooked by the general public and music "connoisseurs".

Great thread btw and some really brilliant and insightful posts. I'm amazed I've missed it initially, thanks for bringin' it back up :)

I love the BOLD quote. Indeed, another reason to love the song as it tells a 'hidden' story and I like that in songs. it takes you away and it makes you aware of a otherwise 'shunned' topic.
 

Tony R

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Strangely Morphine came on my playlist on the drive home yesterday, I hadn't heard it for ages.

It got me thinking how damn experimental MJ got in the last 90's. I mean this song both sonically, structurally & in regards to the subject manner.

So frustrating that he isn't known for this time of stuff instead of 'just' the amazing pop he produced.

We have spoken already about MJ not being respected enough as an artist & this is another example. The fact that he was opening his heart up so much on such a personal matter is astounding. The lyrics in the bridge for example:

Relax
This won't hurt you
Before I put it in
Close your eyes and count to ten
Don't cry
I won't convert you
There's no need to dismay
Close your eyes and drift away

Demerol
Demerol
Oh, God, he's taking Demerol
Demerol
Demerol
Oh, God, he's taking Demerol

He's tried
Hard to convince her
To be over what he had
Today he wants it twice as bad
Don't cry
I won't resent you
Yesterday you had his trust
Today he's taking twice as much

Yes, he output around this time was so different to anything I've ever heard anyone produce, especially a mainstream pop or R&B artist.

Little Susie
Morphine
Earth Song
TDCAU
Stranger in Moscow
 

AlwaysThere

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The mainstream media always refers to Michael's '80s output as the primordial reason why he's the greatest pop star of all time. Rightfully so but, as much as I adore said material, all that showed was that he was skilled with making great pop music.

However - and this is a point I will push forever - the '90s is when Michael proved himself as an all-around ARTIST, a title very few people are graced with. Anybody can be adept at making a certain genre, but it takes talent (not only by the singer themselves but also by the people they surround themselves with) to not only open themselves up to experimentation and exploration of other mediums, but also to pull it off.

Will You Be There
They Don't Care About Us
Stranger in Moscow
Earth Song
Childhood
Little Susie
Morphine
Is It Scary

These are not your average pop songs. These are artistic explorations and aesthetic triumphs. Michael's versatility, both vocally and musically, is something every musician on the face of the planet should be envious of.
 

Prince Of Pop

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I prefer hydrocodone......Oh you mean Morphine the song...LOVE IT. lol

Seriously, Hydro is good for back problems. Only downside is that after it wears off, you feel like your dragging ass.
 

Hess

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Great song.

Such strong lyrics. - Such emotions. - those break downs (are they bridges?) they are genius!

All the new songs on BOTDF are great. - Very sad they did not get more promotion. Is It Scary is one of my favorite MJ songs.

Morphine is quite scary too. - Now after MJ's death, and how he died. The lyrics are a bit too close to the truth.

MJ released this song - was it a cry for help? If so, noone responded.... :(
 

Antwort

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^^^Interesting question there at the end Hess, very interesting. It is sad to think that no one responded in time. Who knows how many and great things could have happened if someone came in time.......

The mainstream media always refers to Michael's '80s output as the primordial reason why he's the greatest pop star of all time. Rightfully so but, as much as I adore said material, all that showed was that he was skilled with making great pop music.

However - and this is a point I will push forever - the '90s is when Michael proved himself as an all-around ARTIST, a title very few people are graced with. Anybody can be adept at making a certain genre, but it takes talent (not only by the singer themselves but also by the people they surround themselves with) to not only open themselves up to experimentation and exploration of other mediums, but also to pull it off.

Will You Be There
They Don't Care About Us
Stranger in Moscow
Earth Song
Childhood
Little Susie
Morphine
Is It Scary

These are not your average pop songs. These are artistic explorations and aesthetic triumphs. Michael's versatility, both vocally and musically, is something every musician on the face of the planet should be envious of.

Very, very true. The songs you listed truly showcase Michael's genius, his brilliant intellect and his loving and caring heart. He was so much more than just a sing & dance man and far more than just a gorgeous face with curls. Otherwise, he couldn't have captured my attention for 24 long years :p Let's put it this way - if Beat it, OTW and Bad were the only type of songs to his name then I wouldn't be here right now. Heavens, I wouldn't have been around in 1993. But since he also happened to write all them marvels you put and also Heal the world and another dozen of similar masterpiece, I guess I'm still around. Neither the Thriller sales, nor the fact that he could moonwalk were ever terribly impressive to me, but the fact that he could write such brilliant tunes was beyond inspiring. Where I come from people need to have not just a lovely exterior, but amazing minds and generous souls as well and one Mr. Jackson certainly had plenty of those and then some.......
 
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wonderouzdj2

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"Ya dogs a bitchh baby. Ya make me sick baby!" So was he just calling her pet what it technically was or what?
 

KOPV

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I've never taken morphine! so IDK if I like it.... worth picking up?
 

jackson fan

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Morphine is easily one my favourite MJ song. I don't think I need to anything more that as been already said. Honestly, the HIStory/BOTDF eras were the best one in terms of his artistic works and Morphine is one of the best examples to what Michael could truly do. Definitively, a genius at his best.
 

morinen

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I'm not very fond of Morphine musically - I'm not into that type of music. But I find it very interesting and significant in the context of both Michael's life and his artistic expression. It definitely is one of the pieces that most vividly show his versatility and ability to create and perform in different styles when he wished to do so.

And it's a great introspective work. It was the only time Michael himself publically addressed his drug problem - artistically, of course, and to some degree symbolically, but nevertheless, it is his perspective on the issue. Not his family's, not his friends', not his handlers' or doctors'. And it's very honest and revealing. (While Michael's issues with sedatives were known for a long time, it wasn't until the AEG trial and Debbie's testimony that I realized the full context of lyrics He tried / Hard to convince her / To give him more of what he had / Today he wants it twice as bad and just how autobiographical it was.)
Witten in the mid 90-s, when Michael was far from the end of this road, the song already tells it all - his reasons, his attitude to the addiction, and even the effect of the drug, which is brilliantly conveyed musically.

I find the lyrics very interesting (and I wish we had the exact correct lyrics, because all online versions seem to be partially wrong). Who do you think Michael addresses in the song as "baby," "daddy"? Who is "he" and who is "you"? I understand it as a dialog with himself. All these personas in the song are sides of him. It's an internal struggle of an addict, a person controlled by the drug, with his alter ego angered and disgusted by this weakness and addiction. The sharp, hard verses are accusations he throws at himself, and the address in second/third person symbolizes his repulsion ("A hot fix, honey/ He dug the ditch, baby/ You make me sick, baby/ So unbeloved!"). He bitterly voices his own excuses - that his life is hard, he has to deal with slander ("You got place, baby/ Kicked in the face, baby/ You hate your race, baby/ You're not the liar!") But these excuses have no weight in his own eyes. The thought that he needs drugs to function and move forward is sickening ("You make me sick, baby/ You talk survival!") He understands that he doesn't meet the high standard fans expect of him ("You're called a Saint, baby /You're so beloved!") He is angry with the drug, angry with the situation he is in, angry with himself, and seems ready to repudiate himself, but... the chorus arrives along with a savior doctor who cannot be resisted... The chorus and bridge are melodic, soothing, convincing ("Trust in me, put all your trust in me", "Relax, it won't hurt you..."). The verse changed to chorus, then another verse, and a chorus again - the protagonist argues and struggles with himself, but the problem remains unresolved in the end ("You just sit around/ Just talking about it/ You're taking Morphine!")

it's brilliant.
 
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