Historical: Official Estate Statement About the Vault

Doggone

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So dangerous anniversary is confirmed?! With a documentary?!?! Omggg
 

SmoothGangsta

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I'd just like to say that the whole "MJ hated sony" narrative is quite tiring. He had some problems with them but they supported him with the release of the ultimate collection and he even came to them to work on Thriller 25. I agree about the Estate though. Their priorities are all in the wrong place imo.
 

AlwaysThere

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Ninety percent of Michael's outrage seemed to be directed at Tommy Mottola. Note that after Mottola resigned in January 2003, there was suddenly an influx of projects that Michael either signed of on or was actively involved with, sans contractual obligations. Surely there was still tension between the two parties, but Michael was clearly able to sideline his feelings enough to proceed with them.

There are also two things worth mentioning:

(1) Sony is the distributor, not the creative mindsets. They of course have a say in how projects turn out, but at the end of the day Branca and McClain call the shots. For example, Sony VIP John Doelp apparently advocated against including remixes on Bad 25, and we can see how that turned out. The idea that Sony is somehow responsible for quality control thus far, or even that they have any considerable say in it, is blatantly incorrect.

(2) Sony has done an incredible job with promotion. People tend to use the campaigns that took place in Michael's lifetime as leverage to say that they're doing a poor job, which is absurd. Keep in mind that this is a dead artist, meaning the label is solely responsible for advertising the project and attracting public interest since Michael isn't here to do it himself, and they do a damn good job. Everyone knew Michael and Xscape were coming out, whether they were fans or not; conversely, a new Jimi Hendrix album dropped four months ago and I didn't know about it until a week or two ago. I can't name a single deceased singer who is granted such attention from a label years after their passing. It's not perfect, but we should be at least partially grateful.
 

Slave To The Rhythm

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AlwaysThere;4225416 said:
Okay, let's break this one down sentence by sentence.
LONG POST ALERT -- summary at the bottom.



Commentary from the Estate in regards to the condition of the vault has been so inconsistent and vague that it's difficult to ascertain what's fact and what's fiction. Karen Langford told the IRS that the vault was empty (I'll address that in depth next), yet the Estate here maintains that "eventually more music will be released." Who are they lying to?



Oh. They're lying to the IRS.

It is a verifiable fact that there is completed music in existence that has yet to appear on a commercial product. Beyond the 10 bootlegged tracks that have popped up online over the last two decades, both John Branca and L.A. Reid have gone on record citing a minimum of 16 finished songs that were briefly considered for Xscape. Better still, it's safe to assume that that number omits material written/produced by reluctant or abstained parties (e.g., Quincy Jones, RedOne, Rod Temperton, will.i.am). If the vault is truly void of completed material, what of those 16 tracks?



What is this newfound sense of righteousness? Four years ago they willingly produced a remix album in which contemporary producers completely ignored the original material and concocted new music around the pre-recorded vocals, and now suddenly they care about what Michael would've wanted done with his music?



I assume this school of thought was only adopted following Xscape, as there are several songs in their pre-2014 catalog that Michael never put full vocals to ("Hollywood Tonight," "Don't Be Messin' 'Round," "I'm So Blue," "Free," "Al Capone"). Hell, even "Love Never Felt So Good" isn't vocally finished!



"Earth Song" toiled through six years of infrequent purification and several dozen mixes with a scratch vocal. Conversely, he ditched the completed "Loving You" rather promptly. Similarly, the finalized "Chicago" failed to make it past the summer of 1999, while "Shut Up and Dance" was granted no vocals whatsoever yet endured right up until his death. There are several other analogous examples to pick from.

There were many fully-finished songs that held little significance to Michael. Alternatively, there were many partial demos that he treasured. It was a case-by-case basis, and a blanket concept shouldn't be attributed to every outtake.



What self-pitying hogwash. Yes, those of us with an appetite for music will express some level of impatience or annoyance at delays or long periods of inactivity, but that's a commonality among an artist's fans, whether living or dead. Very few flat-out criticize the Estate for spacing out projects, as most of us are rational enough to recognize that Michael is no longer here to create new music, meaning all that exists is all that will EVER exist. Complaining about lulls in action is the least of concerns, especially when taking into account everything that fans could complain about.

Moreover, it should be noted that recent critiques have not been centered on the decision to step away from the vault, but rather on the bullsh*t rationales given to justify said decision. Honesty is always the best policy; whether or not we like the truth, the Estate would be far better off giving it.



A considerable percentage of fans are preservationists — they want to hear the material essentially as it was found, without embellishments or outside interference, completely organic and authentic. That is hardly an unwarranted or excessive demand.

Even under circumstances in which outside producers must come in to finish the existing music, there is a clearly defined way to go about it: (a) only use individuals who knew Michael to an intimate-enough degree to properly execute his wishes onto a given track; and (b) enhance, DON'T remix.

MICHAEL was on the right course in this respect — the predominance of producers had collaborated with Michael in the past and, while clearly imperfect, the end game was to accentuate what was there rather than create from scratch and, on the whole, they succeeded — whereas XSCAPE completely dropped the ball by welcoming producers who likely never met Michael, much less worked with him, and dismissed everything beyond the existing vocals.



Though not a universal alibi, most fans empathize with the focus on commercial viability and understand why it is a focal point — the Estate IS a business, after all, and businesses shouldn't/can't be expected to funnel money into a project that won't make a profit.

But to discount the several avenues through which the Estate could disseminate "unfinished" material without spending an exorbitant amount of money either shows stupidity or laziness. Since Michael's existing catalog will persist as the chief source of funds, why not let current pressings go out-of-print and repackage Thriller or Dangerous with outtakes and demos, effectively forcing the public into buying them? Or why not replicate The Ultimate Fan Extras Collection and toss a parcel of music on iTunes, requiring only mixing/mastering fees? Or assume Michael's philosophy and drop a single every so often?


TL/DR; not only is the Estate's justification for going on a musical hiatus full of holes and inconsistencies, their reaction to fan criticism boils down to juvenile finger-pointing and complaints of maltreatment. Clearly those who identify as anti-Estate will complain either way, but for the bulk of us who so desperately want to see them succeed, this sort of response is equal parts ludicrious and disheartening.

Sorry but I don‘t understand you at all... their statement ist totally fine. All it says is that there is nothing finished in the vaults. What they mean are songs they think they could release in that state to be a success not some demos that sound like a song from the 80s or early 2000s... they mean they would have to do a new production to them and release them like they did it with Xscape and that‘s the perfect way. Would be a wasted opportunity to only release an old demo which would only be heard by the diehard fans...

And they are right they are criticized for everything they do and that will always be the case you just proved it.

The only point I agree with you is the part about the sentence with „we only want to release songs that he sang multiple times and we know he cared about“
That was probably just to please the fans but I think it‘s fine to release songs he didn‘t sing many times as long as the end product sounds good.
 

Smooth72

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So dangerous anniversary is confirmed?! With a documentary?!?! Omggg

At some point. They would be wise to stay away from Spike Lee. His docs were average at best. The biggest reason to stay away from him is most people do not care for him. I know for a fact that people I know who are MJ fans would not watch because of Spike. So estate find a better producer hell use Prince Jackson anyone would be an improvement.
 

SmoothGangsta

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At some point. They would be wise to stay away from Spike Lee. His docs were average at best. The biggest reason to stay away from him is most people do not care for him. I know for a fact that people I know who are MJ fans would not watch because of Spike. So estate find a better producer hell use Prince Jackson anyone would be an improvement.

Yeah, they really need to stop with that his docs are really bad.
 

SmoothGangsta

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Slave To The Rhythm;4225480 said:
Sorry but I don‘t understand you at all... their statement ist totally fine. All it says is that there is nothing finished in the vaults. What they mean are songs they think they could release in that state to be a success not some demos that sound like a song from the 80s or early 2000s... they mean they would have to do a new production to them and release them like they did it with Xscape and that‘s the perfect way. Would be a wasted opportunity to only release an old demo which would only be heard by the diehard fans...

And they are right they are criticized for everything they do and that will always be the case you just proved it.

The only point I agree with you is the part about the sentence with „we only want to release songs that he sang multiple times and we know he cared about“
That was probably just to please the fans but I think it‘s fine to release songs he didn‘t sing many times as long as the end product sounds good.

I think it's more about respecting MJ as an artist and less about commercial viability. Some fan's obsession with that really discourages me and says to me that the estate will continue in this direction because it really does seem to be what fans want. :(
 

Korgnex

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These boards are fairly dead for an artist as popular as Michael.

And if they had issued every song he left, would it be different? Whether MJ had released a hundred songs during his life time or a hundred get released posthumously, it makes no difference.

And that's because there's nothing really left to discuss.

That's life. When people die, it's not getting more to talk about, it's getting less with every day. Life goes on for all who live...
 

AlwaysThere

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Slave To The Rhythm;4225480 said:
Sorry but I don‘t understand you at all... their statement ist totally fine. All it says is that there is nothing finished in the vaults. What they mean are songs they think they could release in that state to be a success not some demos that sound like a song from the 80s or early 2000s.

This is a peculiar angle. How could the bolded be considered a bad thing? Popular music is experiencing a nostalgic renaissance; not only are styles and production flairs from the '80s and '90s being integrated into contemporary music, but there is an increasing appetite for old-fashioned classics and/or anything that resembles them. "Love Never Felt So Good" is regularly praised by critics for hearkening back to the Off the Wall atmosphere and is largely considered to be the best song on Xscape. Meanwhile, critics went absolutely wild over the original demo of "Xscape," which is quite distinctly a late '90s/early 2000s song.

Commercial success is not measured by whether or not a song sounds "current." Some of the most recent smash hits were the exact opposite: "Get Lucky," "Uptown Funk," "24K Magic," "Shut Up and Dance," "I Feel it Coming," "Finesse"... the list goes on. If the song connects with the masses, they will listen to it. The sound is completely irrelevant.

But that's all besides the point, because that's not at all what they said. They said that there was nothing FINISHED left in the vault, meaning songs that are vocally and instrumentally complete, which is a blatant lie. They also told the IRS that there was nothing in the vault PERIOD, which is another lie. This isn't nitpicking or overreacting. The Estate is outright lying.

they mean they would have to do a new production to them and release them like they did it with Xscape and that‘s the perfect way. Would be a wasted opportunity to only release an old demo which would only be heard by the diehard fans...

No, that's neither a necessity nor the "perfect way" to go about a posthumous release.

"Hold My Hand" is an excellent example of how the Estate should proceed with future endeavors: the album version is simply an embellished version of the demo. Parallel production qualities, parallel arrangements — just a more polished presentation. If the goal is to preserve the feeling and emotion Michael intended to portray in a given song, that is the way to do it, not creating a new instrumental around a disembodied vocal.

And they are right they are criticized for everything they do and that will always be the case you just proved it.

Did you conveniently skim over the sections of my post where I gave the Estate credit, or are you simply of the mindset that the Estate shouldn't be criticized for any reason? Should we just sit back and shrug off every bad idea they execute?

Re-read what I wrote. I want the Estate to succeed, and there have been moments where they hit the nail on the head or came incredibly close to doing so, but they are making it so incredibly difficult to support them. Nothing in this statement holds any basis of reality, and almost the entirety of it is a lie, an exaggeration, or a childish case of finger-pointing.

SmoothGangsta;4225482 said:
Yeah, they really need to stop with that his docs are really bad.

Agreed. I think Bad 25 is pretty damn great, but Off the Wall is the worst Estate-sanctioned project to date imo. Completely and utterly useless in every respect.
 

SmoothGangsta

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Bad 25 was great. I liked Off the Wall documentary too but it wasn't as good.

Yeah Bad 25 was a okay. The Off The Wall documentary is time I will never get back though. His documentaries aren't really in depth enough for me. They are basically an hour of celebrities saying "MJ was great" and then some cool footage thrown in. Bad 25 was at least entertaining, I was actually scratching my head at how bad the OTW one was, though.
 

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Yeah Bad 25 was a okay. The Off The Wall documentary is time I will never get back though. His documentaries aren't really in depth enough for me. They are basically an hour of celebrities saying "MJ was great" and then some cool footage thrown in. Bad 25 was at least entertaining, I was actually scratching my head at how bad the OTW one was, though.
OTW Doc should have included a remastered Triumph/Destiny tour with unheared Live Audio. That would have made up for it lol. We know they recorded in HQ audio (Triumph Live album). Severely missed opportunity IMO. Future Docs should be packaged the same as Bad 25.
 

Hulkamaniac

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OTW Doc should have included a remastered Triumph/Destiny tour with unheared Live Audio. That would have made up for it lol. We know they recorded in HQ audio (Triumph Live album). Severely missed opportunity IMO.

Yeah, I was at least expecting one full song from the Triumph tour in the doc...
 

DuranDuran

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They should have taken cues from how releases have been handled for other legacy artists like Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Elvis, etc, but they certainly don't seem like they have.

Still nothing about some sort of collectors label for Michael similar to the one Elvis has had since the late 90's. An avenue to keep the fans engaged and happy while making small profits and without having to worry about commercial viability.
Elvis has had remixes (A Little Less Conversation, Rubbernecking, etc.) and albums with Natalie Cole/Nat King Cole style overdubbed duets with modern artists and orchestras. Not only unreleased stuff released like they are. Also with classic rock acts like Elvis, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, & The Beatles, there's an audience who will buy CDs with multiple flubbed takes, alternate versions, and studio chatter. It doesn't have to be finished songs. Like The Beatles Anthology CD sets. That's not generally the case with other genres.
 

WildStyle

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Elvis has had remixes (A Little Less Conversation, Rubbernecking, etc.) and albums with Natalie Cole/Nat King Cole style overdubbed duets with modern artists and orchestras. Not only unreleased stuff released like they are. Also with classic rock acts like Elvis, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, & The Beatles, there's an audience who will buy CDs with multiple flubbed takes, alternate versions, and studio chatter. It doesn't have to be finished songs. Like The Beatles Anthology CD sets. That's not generally the case with other genres.

I'm aware that with the Elvis releases every now and then they will attempt a more commercial friendly release, but the majority of releases are an attempt to build his artistic reputation. And there are releases for the hardcore fans every few months.

Who says there is no market for MJ outtakes? Would you not want to listen to more recordings like Michael's songwriting tape for The Girl Is Mine which was played at the deposition in Mexico?
 

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Well, yeah. It's not a good business plan to release stuff all at once.
They will trickle out new/unreleased material over the years to sustain the estate and the income.
So long as it is profitable.
I dunno why there STILL isn't any Jacksons related content yet. I can't imagine its the brothers holding anything up.
 

Robbsaber01

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Yeah, I was at least expecting one full song from the Triumph tour in the doc...

Agreed. OTW or DSTYGE in full wouldve been epic. Can you imagine if they used a '96 OTW medley performance lol I'd officially give up on the estate.
 

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This article clarifies the history of Michael Jackson's business dealings, back in 1991, till now, more or less. Since the Estate's executor's are a business enterprise, the devil is in the details. Look at how much money Michael was raking in with his new contract with Sony back in 1991. That's how the Estate is operating at present. Plus the quality in taking their time, just like Michael always did!

Michael Jackson Agrees to Huge Contract With Sony


MAR 21, 1991

In a thriller of a deal, pop icon Michael Jackson has signed a long-term contract with Sony Corp. that guarantees him an unprecedented share of the profits from his next six albums, his own record label, a role in developing video software products and a shot at movie stardom.

The contract, the biggest ever awarded an entertainer, is expected to return hundreds of millions of dollars to Jackson. It also cements Sony's relationship with its biggest star, who reportedly had threatened to move to another label in a contract dispute last year.

"We're married to him now," Sony Software President Michael P. Schulhof said Wednesday.

Sony, which inherited Jackson when it bought CBS Records for $2 billion in 1988, declined to discuss specific terms of the deal. But sources close to the talks said the agreement makes Jackson a significant partner in all business ventures with the Japanese electronics giant.

Jackson, 32, reportedly could receive more than $120 million per album if sales match the 40-million-plus level of his smash mid-'80s album "Thriller." Two sources close to the talks said the reclusive singer is guaranteed an advance payment of $5 million per record plus a 25% royalty from each album based on retail sales.

"If he continues to sell records like he has in the past, he will earn more money than any other person in the history of the record business," said one person familiar with the deal.

Sony said it expects to realize $1 billion in revenue from the partnership. But some financial analysts called the Jackson deal extravagant. "They (had) better hope he stays popular," said one analyst who asked not to be named. Another accused Sony of "grandstanding."

Industry analyst Harold Vogel of Merrill Lynch & Co. said the Jackson deal could change the record business. "It's off the scale, basically," Vogel said.

Entertainment attorney Jay Cooper said the deal could result in everything from higher overall payments to top performers to higher album prices. "What do you think is going to happen the minute Bruce Springsteen's contract comes up for renegotiation?" Cooper said.

The issue of Jackson's productivity was also raised by critics. The singer released only three solo albums since "Off the Wall" in 1979. If that trend continues, he will be approaching 60 when his final record under the Sony deal hits the stores. One source predicted that Jackson will step up the pace now. He also reportedly will augment his new material with a "greatest hits" collection. But Schulhof said he was not concerned.

"A great entertainer stays ahead of the public tastes and helps shape them," Schulhof said. "I am confident that, no matter what his age . . . he will stay ahead of the public."

Sony's reputation for unbridled spending stems from its $3.4-billion purchase of Columbia Pictures Entertainment two years ago. The company, which paid out unprecedented sums of money for upper management and movie deals, has been blamed for driving up costs in Hollywood.

Jackson's much-rumored deal is the result of months of difficult negotiations between Sony executives and Jackson's phalanx of managers and lawyers. People close to the talks said Jackson insisted on striking a bargain that bridged records, movies and video software.

Before the announcement of her brother's Sony contract, Janet Jackson's estimated $32-million deal last week was the largest in history. A & M Records President Al Cafaro, whose company lost the fierce bidding battle over Janet Jackson to Virgin Records, said record companies may be vesting too much importance in individual performers.

"These kinds of deals are great for the artists involved--a real bonanza," Cafaro said. "But a label runs the risk that these huge agreements will distract them from the real business of record companies, which is developing new and exciting talent and artistry. The future continues to be about that unknown artist waiting to wow the world."

Sony, however, already has a certified wower in Jackson. The former child star's "Thriller," released in 1982, is the biggest-selling album of all time. "Bad," the 1987 follow-up, claimed sales of 25 million.

Jackson, often the butt of jokes because of his reported facial reconstructions and his penchant for spangled wardrobes, is nobody's fool when it comes to business deals. He made a combined $70 million from separate endorsement contracts with Pepsico and L.A. Gear. Jackson also owns the publishing rights to the Beatles songs.

The Sony deal guarantees him a presence in practically every other facet of entertainment. It is the first significant example of the cross-pollination that was supposed to result from a spate of recent media company mergers--including Sony's deals for CBS and Columbia Pictures, Matsushita Electric Industrial Co.'s $6.6-billion purchase of MCA Inc. and the mega-merger that created Time Warner Inc.

Jackson's next record, for which he reportedly received an $18-million advance, is due this summer. In addition, Jackson will be paid a onetime $4-million fee, informed sources said, plus $1 million a year to run Nation Records, the record label created under the deal. Sources said Sony also agreed to put up $2.2 million a year in administration costs.

The agreement gives Jackson full authority to sign acts to the label. Sony executives predicted that "new and established artists" would become part of Nation Records. "Michael Jackson is not exactly a bad magnet for attracting these people," said Sony Music President Tommy Mottola.

Jackson is not the first star to get his own record label. Frank Sinatra started Reprise before selling it to Warner Bros. The Beatles had Apple Records, and more recently labels have been established by such performers as Elton John, the Rolling Stones, Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead and M.C. Hammer. More often than not, the results have been disappointing.

Unlike those acts, Jackson will remain on Sony's Epic Records label. He will also remain a ubiquitous music video presence, since the Sony deal stipulates that such acclaimed directors as Sir Richard Attenborough, David Lynch and Tim Burton will make long-form videos based on songs from Jackson's next album. Jackson will also own 70% of the video rights.

The deal further assures that Jackson will star in his first feature since the 1978 flop "The Wiz." People close to the talks said he will be paid at least $5 million to appear in a musical action adventure based on his own idea.

The movie deal is largely the result of Jackson's friendship with Columbia Pictures Co-Chairman Jon Peters and his partner, Peter Guber. Company officials said further films may follow if the first, set for a 1992 release, is a success. Jackson is also supposed to be given offices on Columbia's Culver City lot.

"The intention is that we will all live happily ever after," said Columbia Executive Vice President Sid Ganis.


http://www.latimes.com/la-me-jacksontimeline-sony-story.html#
 

smoothvillain

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My theory on the "vault" is that it is outdated. Michael worked with so many producers, artists, and engineers throughout the years that he relied on them to keep up with everything he was working on. The vault just does not contain all of it. Michael didn't keep a traditional vault like other artists. Proof is in others' statements and what they've released so far.

I was excited and I enjoyed getting to hear "Loving You" as I'd never heard it before, but on repeated listens it is a very weak track and I can understand why it was shelved. I even have a theory that it could have been one of if not the track that led to the creation of "I Just Can't Stop Loving You."

They probably have gone to great lengths to work with the producers and composers to use some of the better material, but they insist on remixing the tracks. It has been stated that most of the holders that have access to the songs do not want that.

They did irrepairable damage back in 2010 with the Cascio tracks to where now everything new that's released is in question. Which I believe mainly happened because they were desperate for songs to work with and once they were found out went in full damage control mode.

The best idea that someone here already came up with was to let all currently circulated prints run out and then put out the albums as new special editions with outtakes, interviews, like in 2001. Michael's music will always be bought, so the albums would be available and the diehard fans would have a new reason to buy the albums they hold so dearly. Chalk and glow in the dark gimmicks won't cut it.
 

analogue

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To be honest, I'm not all that bothered about getting more new albums. They're nice, but it's not something I need to have. From now on, I'd be happy if any unreleased material shows up on any possible anniversary/special addition albums. The best ''new'' songs we heard, in my opinion was from BAD 25.
 

DuranDuran

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special edition

The best idea that someone here already came up with was to let all currently circulated prints run out and then put out the albums as new special editions with outtakes, interviews, like in 2001.
If more people stream (or download) today than buy a physical product, that can't really run out, can it? Even if they let the albums go out of print, there's a lot of used copies on sale.
 

smoothvillain

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To be honest, I'm not all that bothered about getting more new albums. They're nice, but it's not something I need to have. From now on, I'd be happy if any unreleased material shows up on any possible anniversary/special addition albums. The best ''new'' songs we heard, in my opinion was from BAD 25.

Bad 25 was a great product. I wish they would come out with more re-issues like that. It appears that the people in charge went through the "vault" and took their chances with what they'd thought people would like and hoped it would sell.

It didn't, but it's not all their fault, sometimes things just don't pan out like they'd hoped.

I like most of the decisions they made when it came to Bad 25. I just wonder why they thought the pitbull remixes would help it sell.
 

ChrisC

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I dunno why there STILL isn't any Jacksons related content yet. I can't imagine its the brothers holding anything up.

And on that, would I be right in saying that not a single Jacksons outtake or unreleased song is out there? There's probably about a hundred Jackson 5 ones released on various Motown compilations throughout the years. When Legacy Recordings chose to re-issue Destiny and Triumph the only bonus tracks as I recall were remixes.
 

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I think at times we as the more "diehard" fans tend to forget that despite how huge we appear in terms of numbers we are actually the minority and just a small part of Michael's fandom. This kind of goes for anything really. Music, television, comics, all forms of media and entertainment has its percentage of fans that want it all and then those that simply want the true latest and greatest and nothing more. The fact is that the casual market is what these companies tend to go after. The estate knows we as a whole will buy into and support almost anything they throw out there. There is a set profit that they anticipate making because of us alone. The real issue that they face is how do they make more?

We get caught up in the whole "Money" (the song) thing that we tend to forget at times that this is all about just that. Let's be real here, there is a reason Prince's estate signed a 35 album re-release contract with Sony. Is it in part for the fans? Sure. Bigger picture is that it is for the ability to make money for years to come. The unfortunate thing is that once these stars are gone the ones in control have to find ways to continue to make profits for years to come because there is no true "new" material to work on.

We've heard so many mixed things about Michael's "vault" that I have come to accept that (in my opinion) isn't exactly what we all expect. Sure there might be hundreds of demos out there but what is actually something that they can market and push to make money not just from us but the casuals? Tracks like "Love Never Felt So Good" were pushed so heavily because the quality was already there vocally so they just needed to add JT in the hope that it would push sales. Hell, look at what just happened with the Drake song. Do you think that was an accident? Heck no! That thing has been doing phenomenal because of the relevancy of Drake and the curiosity and power of Michael. How many tracks do you honestly think they have that will have that kind of power an impact ON THEIR OWN? The answer is none. Why? Again, there are a lot of unfinished products that just aren't meant for the masses to buy into and make it a number 1 song. It also doesn't help that Michael himself isn't here to promote any of it.

The estate is relying heavily on us to support and back their projects as well as the power of artists that are alive to promote the work that they put out. That's just business.A lot of it may seem cruel and a lot of it just flat out sucks but this is the reality that we are in. I dont think that there is much left honestly. Sure they can put it all out there but that doesn't really accomplish anything. I think BAD 25 was about as good as it will ever get. I do think there is a market for video footage but that is another conversation. Audio wise, I'd say this is about it.
 
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