New Documentary :Killing Michael Jackson' (about the Murray investigation) 22 June 19 UK

myosotis

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Police almost missed the clue which solved Michael Jackson's death

Investigators were furious after prosecutors charged singer Michael Jackson's physician Conrad Murray with involuntary manslaughter instead of second degree murder

Police started investigating Michael Jackson's personal doctor after a detective's suspicions were aroused by chat with his neighbour

LAPD officer Orlando Martinez told a doctor friend that he had found an empty medicine bottle under a table in the singer's room while investigating his sudden death.

And when the neighbour found out it was a bottle of a powerful anaesthetic called propofol he told Martinez something was wrong.

The detective said: “In Michael's room where he was treated a bottle of propofol had fallen on the ground and moved under this moving nightstand. I didn't know what it did.

“My neighbour was a doctor so I asked him about it. He was the one who got it started with 'whoa, what is this doing there, it's only used in surgery to put people under.”

New details of the investigation into the superstar's demise are revealed in a documentary which will air on British TV in the run up to the 10th anniversary of his death.

Jackson's physician Murray Conrad was jailed for four years after administering propofol through an IV drip to help Jackson sleep.

He was giving the King of Pop nightly infusions of the drug to enable him to rest for his impending This Is It tour.

But police found he failed to monitor Jackson properly.

Now three detectives involved in the original probe have given insights into the investigation.

They were left furious after prosecutors charged Murray with involuntary manslaughter instead of second degree murder.


Martinez and colleagues Dan Myers and Scott Smith believe prosecutors went with the lesser charge because of past criticism over celebrity cases, including that of OJ Simpon who was acquitted of killing his wife Nicole Brown Simpson in 1994.

Myers tells a documentary makers: “I don't think the office wanted a high profile failure. It was an election year for the DA (district attorney).

“I think it was a, I don't want to say the lazy way out, but the charge was the path of least resistance. We felt the evidence suggested it was second degree.”

Fellow detective Martinez said he thought the “level of negligence was just so clear” the team were sure of a second degree murder charge, which carries a possible life term.

“We don’t charge people, we investigate the case and present it. We were not happy with the choice but we deal with what we can,” he says.

“For us, working the cases, we didn't want to make the same mistakes the department remembers and are in the public memory. There was a lot of pressure to get it right.”

They also tell how Conrad – who put his medical bag in a wardrobe after Jackson's death – dropped himself in hot water during interviews.

Martinez says: He freely admitted that for months he had been using it (propofol) to help Mr Jackson to sleep. I was completely blown away. In my head I was thinking...to drug someone to sleep? Even with their permission I didn’t think it was legal.”

Officer Scott Smith says: 'He assumed we had his bags. Once he realised we didn't he had a deer in the headlights kind of look.”

The policemen also told how they were disappointed Conrad was not put in handcuffs during his arrest after his lawyers struck a deal with the Attorney's Office to hand himself in.

Myers said: “I wanted to see Murray in handcuffs, and I think a lot of people wanted to see him in handcuffs, but in this case the rules were changed.”

Jackson paid the cardiologist around £119,000 a month to help him sleep and wanted to take him on tour with him.

Conrad, in debt from a luxury lifestyle which included a million dollar home, was one of several doctors the star had asked to help him.

He claimed his intention was to wean the singer off the drug but prosecutors argued his negligence included leaving Jackson unmonitored while the anaesthetic was pumped into his vein through an IV drip.

Detective Smith said: “There were other doctor's Michael had reached out to to administer propofol to his liking when he wanted it and was turned down.

“he was looking for someone who would administer it, as wrong as it was.”

Murray served just two years of his four year sentence due to prison overcrowding and good behaviour.

Killing Michael Jackson shows next Saturday, June 22, on Quest Red at 10pm

https://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/tv-film-news/police-almost-missed-clue-solved-16537205
 

mjawb2009

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Watched this last night. Factually based , good investigation.
 

terrell

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Detective Smith said: “There were other doctor's Michael had reached out to to administer propofol to his liking when he wanted it and was turned down.


This is where I want to grab MJ and just shake him and say DO NOT USE IT. GOD IS TRYING TO TELL YOU SOMETHING. but he did not listen and now look what happen. Sad.
 

NatureCriminal7896

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Everybody has different stories which one is it? Michael being murder or using propofol to help him sleep?
 

NatureCriminal7896

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Bounce is the first and only broadcast and multi-platform entertainment network serving African Americans, with mix of original series, docuseries and movies.

Part of a docuseries on true crime, Bounce will premiere in the US on September 7 at 8pm (ET) a special documentary called “Killing Michael Jackson” with never-before-seen images and stories through detectives(
detectives Orlando Martinez, Dan Myers, and Scott Smith) who were involved in the investigation that leads to the arrest of Murray.

It is not surprising that such network investigates the death of the most famous black American Entertainer in the world.
 
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ScreenOrigami

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It’s hard to watch, but also very interesting to see the point of view of the detectives. The older one, I don’t remember his name, seemed to have a lot of empathy and looked genuinely sad.

It was also very revealing to learn how much politics played into the prosecution’s decision to not go for 2nd degree murder.

I’d recommend it to anyone who thinks they can handle it. It’s tough, though. I won’t watch it again.
 

elusive moonwalker

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ScreenOrigami;4300737 said:
It’s hard to watch, but also very interesting to see the point of view of the detectives. The older one, I don’t remember his name, seemed to have a lot of empathy and looked genuinely sad.

It was also very revealing to learn how much politics played into the prosecution’s decision to not go for 2nd degree murder.

I’d recommend it to anyone who thinks they can handle it. It’s tough, though. I won’t watch it again.

True. Good points.
 

mjfan05

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Don't have it in me to watch this but it always irked me how unremorseful Murray was. He killed Michael and recklessly endangered his life multiple times before June 25 and never once acted like he realized the enormity of what he did. I think he tried to blame Michael over and over, although I avoided most of his stuff and can't clearly remember. Sad he got out in just 2 years. They charged Michael with 20 different things but Murray gets a slap on the wrist for murder of the most famous person on Earth.
 

ScreenOrigami

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mjfan05;4300752 said:
Don't have it in me to watch this but it always irked me how unremorseful Murray was. He killed Michael and recklessly endangered his life multiple times before June 25 and never once acted like he realized the enormity of what he did. I think he tried to blame Michael over and over, although I avoided most of his stuff and can't clearly remember. Sad he got out in just 2 years. They charged Michael with 20 different things but Murray gets a slap on the wrist for murder of the most famous person on Earth.

Yeah, I don’t understand why he was released after only 2 years. This should only be possible if the person shows remorse. But he went straight onto TV and whined about how he lost everything, and wrote a book about what a great doctor he was and whatnot.

The reason he was charged with involuntary manslaughter instead of 2nd degree murder was – according to this documentary – that the Los Angeles prosecutors had a bad track record with convictions in high-profile cases, and they wanted to make sure they’d get a conviction this time around. They played it safe, so to speak, but you can tell the detectives were anything but happy with this decision.
 

elusive moonwalker

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Standard procedure about only doing half your sentence unless its a crime with special circumstances. Happens in the uk aswell. He didnt even do two. Just under.

Murray was an arrogant piece of you know what. Greedy with a lack of morals in many parts of his life.
 

ScreenOrigami

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elusive moonwalker;4300764 said:
Standard procedure about only doing half your sentence unless its a crime with special circumstances. Happens in the uk aswell. He didnt even do two. Just under.

To be honest, I don’t even know how these things work here in Germany. Fortunately I haven’t been in any situation where this knowledge would have mattered. It just felt wrong, but if it’s the usual procedure then he’s entitled to it like anybody else, of course. Still feels wrong, though. :no:
 

Mikky Dee

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ScreenOrigami;4300754 said:
Yeah, I don’t understand why he was released after only 2 years. This should only be possible if the person shows remorse. But he went straight onto TV and whined about how he lost everything, and wrote a book about what a great doctor he was and whatnot.

The reason he was charged with involuntary manslaughter instead of 2nd degree murder was – according to this documentary – that the Los Angeles prosecutors had a bad track record with convictions in high-profile cases, and they wanted to make sure they’d get a conviction this time around. They played it safe, so to speak, but you can tell the detectives were anything but happy with this decision.

For a murder charge to stick, prosecutors have to be able to prove pre-meditation, planning and motive, I presume. There wasn't enough evidence for them to be able to prove that.

A four year sentence for involuntary manslaughter is ridiculously low...when he didn't even serve half of that because of over-crowded prison conditions, good behaviour and the whatever the other excuses were.....well it's completely disgusting.
 

elusive moonwalker

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For a murder charge to stick, prosecutors have to be able to prove pre-meditation, planning and motive, I presume. There wasn't enough evidence for them to be able to prove that.

A four year sentence for involuntary manslaughter is ridiculously low...when he didn't even serve half of that because of over-crowded prison conditions, good behaviour and the whatever the other excuses were.....well it's completely disgusting.

Not for murder 2. You "only" had to prove
Grave negligence to the point the defendent knew it was highly likely or cetain that death would accure because of the defendents actions.
 

Anna

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Not for murder 2. You "only" had to prove
Grave negligence to the point the defendent knew it was highly likely or cetain that death would accure because of the defendents actions.

Indeed. But they couldn't prove that either. Given that Michael was Murray's cash cow it isn't very likely that Murray would intentionally leave him in a position where he knew it was highly likely he would die. Though he was certainly grossly negligent.
 

ScreenOrigami

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Not for murder 2. You "only" had to prove
Grave negligence to the point the defendent knew it was highly likely or cetain that death would accure because of the defendents actions.

If I remember correctly, they had hoped that the fact Murray cleaned up evidence before calling 911 would prove exactly that.
 

NatureCriminal7896

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NatureCriminal7896;4300705 said:
Bounce is the first and only broadcast and multi-platform entertainment network serving African Americans, with mix of original series, docuseries and movies.

Part of a docuseries on true crime, Bounce will premiere in the US on September 7 at 8pm (ET) a special documentary called “Killing Michael Jackson” with never-before-seen images and stories through detectives(
detectives Orlando Martinez, Dan Myers, and Scott Smith) who were involved in the investigation that leads to the arrest of Murray.

It is not surprising that such network investigates the death of the most famous black American Entertainer in the world.

i'm not sure if the US version gonna be different. we will have to wait and see for those who live in the US. i'm probably not watching so if anyone else watches it let's us if it's different from the uk version.
 

elusive moonwalker

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Indeed. But they couldn't prove that either. Given that Michael was Murray's cash cow it isn't very likely that Murray would intentionally leave him in a position where he knew it was highly likely he would die. Though he was certainly grossly negligent.

Who knows. The jury were never given the option so we cant say one way or the other. Murray didnt have to leave mj intentionally. There doesnt have to be intent only the knowledge that what you were doing was so negligent that it was an action highly likley to cause death. It would have been upto the jury to decide whether murray giving diprivan outside of a hospital setting with no monitoring equipment and then leaving the room equates to someone (a medical professional) knowingly acting in a fashion that was so negligent there was a high probability of death. there doesnt have to be intent or malice like in a normal murder charge. It comes more under the "what would the reasonable man do" term that is used in M.S cases.

I agree with the police that the D.A certainly didnt want to lose the case. A M.S charge was a slam dunk. they could have gone with a murder 2 with M.S as an option but maybe the D.A thought a jury would probably play it safe and go with a M.S conviction instead anyway so why waste time,money and effort arguing a murder 2
 
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