People sing They Don't Care About Us at US protest

Tygger

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well you are twisting here. I didn't claim anyone stated MTV/VH1 as favorable to Michael. I said "somewhat portray them more positive towards Michael."

allow me to explain what I meant: What would be the most positive way to air TDACAU? No ban at all, right? Both videos playing freely at all day long. Which would be followed by censorship, temporary ban and full long time ban.

So a ban is the most negative thing that could happen to any song/video. Being just censored or never ever banned at all is a more positive thing than being banned.

That's what I meant by portraying them as more positive towards Michael. If anyone believes MTV/VH1 or any other channel banned / censored Michael's songs unfairly, MTV/VH1 should be named and shamed - and that's what I believe the author is doing here. Shaming the parties who resulted in such ban/censorship. Denying what MTV/VH1 did only helps to portray them more positively and with less fault.

I get it that you don't believe MTV/VH1 banned TDCAU. I believe they did. Even if it was just censorship - such as airing video late at night- it wasn't okay in my book. I don't want to see them to get a free pass . So I'm glad that there is such a positive article calling all those parties on their role in "banning" TDCAU.

I feel I made myself extremely clear in this regard and majority will understand my position and as I said before I have no interest in engaging in any personal jabs with you. So I'll continue to ignore them while focusing on the discussion.

You felt you needed to clarify your response (quite lengthy too) and that alone says quite a bit.
 

InvincibleMJ

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The last 4 and a half pages of this thread are just one big Déjà vu.

respect77;4065576 said:
MJJCommunity &#8207;<s>@</s>MJJCommunity Heal The World Played At Sydney Siege Site [Video] http://mjjc.info/1CqWVhk <s>#</s>MJJCNews



http://www.mjjcommunity.com/news/he...e-video?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

sydney-siege-tributes-1.jpg

I wish there was a video... so touching.
 

Tygger

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Interesting posts.

To say Michael would use a derogatory slur to hurt a member of another cultural/religious group in his song would be to misinterpret his intentions. He generalized those terms. No term refers to any one particular individual in his life.

Please utilize the report function anytime one feels a post is offensive or one feels they are being jabbed.
 

SheilaMJFan4Ever

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Look who's back in circulation?! I've missed a lot (due to being ill and a heavy work schedule), so I'm jumping in this with my usual straight-no-chaser style, LOL!

TDCAU and Mike is loved around the globe, has been used numerous times for marches, protests on this side of the Pond. If you're only relying on mainstream media for your info, you are missing a LOT. This current movement has been long overdue and I'm glad my fellow Americans are speaking out against police brutality/abuse of the system. Absolute power corrupts absolutely and I don't trust that the police can police themselves, because there isn't a reliable checks & balances in place. As for good cops, they do exist, but unless they actually start calling out their corrupt colleagues and shine a light on it (like Officer Frank Serpico did in the 70s against the NYPD) they are a silent co-signer of the corruption. It also doesn't help quell the unease the public has for law enforcement when they are geared up like they're about to go to Afghanistan for a couple of tours.

The "die-ins" held here in Atlanta had many of the protesters singing TDCAU as they marched peacefully and that's just the one I've personally observed.

While I don't condone targeting cops for death (or any kind of violent protest), I do find it hypocritical that they are "in fear" of the public they swore to serve and protect. A power-tripping police force is bad enough. A PARANOID power-tripping police force is dangerous for society as a whole.


NWA_zps2f5b49f0.jpg
 
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THREAD CLEANED!

This thread has been cleaned. Consider this a general warning for any continuation of this argument. Racist remarks and conspiracies are not allowed on MJJC, neither are attacks directed towards anyone's personal beliefs or ethnic backgrounds. Any users who continue to engage in this sort of behaviors or attempt to continue the argument will be subject to more serious sanctions with no further warning. Please remain civil and respectful towards each other.
 

SarahJ

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"A power-tripping police force is bad enough. A PARANOID power-tripping police force is dangerous for society as a whole."


As are those in society who stay silent and do nothing while its happening. Voices raised as one for whats right and true is an extremely powerful force.

I've only seen the odd clip of TDCAU being sung. Must have been amazing to witness.
 

max000

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Not sure this was mentioned. The NY Times, the most powerful news paper in the land started the controversy about the song. The song was leaked to the times music critic. The times called out spielberg. And like most people Spielberg bowed to the ny times, responding in the op-ed page. Proud of MJ for blowing off the ny times, who were surely pissed.
 

HIStoric

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Proud of MJ for blowing off the ny times, who were surely pissed.

But wouldn't blowing them off be ignoring them and refusing to edit the song? The NY Times got a pretty good reaction out of it, causing one of the world's biggest artists to rush back into the studio and re-edit one of their songs, I don't think they'd be pissed...
 

InvincibleMJ

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^ I think Michael didn't imagine this could be hurtful to anyone and the reaction took him by surprise. Once he realized some people were offended by this, he rushed to the studio and also released a statement that was not addressed to the press, but to the Jewish people who might have been hurt (since he can't tell people what they should or shouldn't be offended by) I don't think he did to to satisfy the NY Times but to show he never meant to hurt anyone - Ego aside.
 

HIStoric

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^ I think Michael didn't imagine this could be hurtful to anyone and the reaction took him by surprise. Once he realized some people were offended by this, he rushed to the studio and also released a statement that was not addressed to the press, but to the Jewish people who might have been hurt (since he can't tell people what they should or shouldn't be offended by) I don't think he did to to satisfy the NY Times but to show he never meant to hurt anyone - Ego aside.

Yeah I agree, I was just referring to the specific terminology Max used, that's all. I don't know if I'd still consider it as MJ 'blowing' them off since, ultimately, he did respond to something they instigated (even though he aimed his apology towards the Jews, not the paper). In saying that, I can definitely see what Max meant by it now, thinking on it. :)
 

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Not Frantz Fanon @violentfanon · Jan 18

Get Up Street Theater dances for crowd to Michael Jackson's "They don't really care about us". #ReclaimMLK #Oakland
B7qRdGuCEAAcnCU.jpg

B7qRb_KCYAAeZ9a.jpg


Feminist Bully @bullhorngirl · 15. Jan.

The sing in group laughs and claps as they sing Michael Jackson's "Man in the Mirror." #ReclaimMLKchi #ReclaimMLK
B7ZxvHCCMAEVYrI.jpg:large
 

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Michael Jackson - They Don't Care About Us
1/24/2015 0 Comments

Immagine





"They Don't Care About Us" is the fourth single from Michael Jackson's album HIStory: Past, Present and Future, Book I, released on March 31, 1996. The song remains one of the most controversial pieces Jackson ever composed. In the US, media scrutiny surrounding allegations of antisemitic lyrics were the catalyst for Jackson issuing multiple apologies and re-recording the song with altered lyrics. The singer countered allegations of antisemitism, arguing that reviews had misinterpreted the context of the song, either unintentionally or deliberately.

The song was accompanied by two music videos directed by Spike Lee. The first was shot in two locations in Brazil, in Pelourinho, the historic city centre of Salvador, and in a favela of Rio de Janeiro called Dona Marta, where the state authorities had tried to ban all production over fears the video would damage their image, the area and prospects of Rio de Janeiro staging the 2004 Olympics. Still, the residents of the area were happy to see the singer, hoping their problems would be made visible to a wider audience.The second video was shot in a prison and contained video footage of multiple references to human rights abuses.

Commercially, the song became a top ten hit in all European countries and number one in Germany for three weeks. In the US, radio stations were reluctant to play the controversial composition; it, however, managed to peak at number 30 on the Billboard Hot 100

http://popicons.weebly.com/videos/michael-jackson-they-dont-care-about-us
 

Paris78

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Joe Vogel retweetete
armond white @3xchair · 30. Jan.

How #MichaelJackson inspired #KevinCostner's new film. Read it now. http://www.nationalreview.com/article/397561/black-or-white-jacksonian-dream-armond-white &#8230;
B8nU1McIIAAcV7C.jpg:large

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/397561/black-or-white-jacksonian-dream-armond-white

Black or White: A Jacksonian Dream

Kevin Costner&#8217;s Black or White is sentimental in a good way. After all, it works in the spirit of Michael Jackson&#8217;s 1991 single &#8220;Black or White,&#8221; the most uncompromised of all uplifting pop songs. Jackson declared &#8220;I&#8217;m not gonna spend my life being a color!&#8221; And when he sang &#8220;I ain&#8217;t scared of your brother / I ain&#8217;t scared of no sheets,&#8221; he opposed the antinomies of either ethnic solidarity (Afrocentric &#8220;blackness&#8221;) or ethnic hostility (Ku Klux Klan&#8211;style white supremacy).

Costner applies Jackson&#8217;s pop principles to playing the role of Elliot Anderson, a wealthy white Los Angeles lawyer. Elliot&#8217;s recent bereavement leaves him as guardian of his biracial granddaughter Eloise (Jillian Estell), which means he already lives America&#8217;s blended-nation experience, not the fatuous &#8220;post-racial&#8221; notion but a reality that confirms Jackson&#8217;s dream of unity as memorably shown in the iconographic sequence of his extraordinary &#8220;Black or White&#8221; music video &#8212; still the finest achievement of that genre &#8212; that morphed all mankind&#8217;s ethnic and sexual physical characteristics.

The title of Costner&#8217;s film makes a statement; yet, like Jackson&#8217;s hit record, it also poses several questions: First about family, then character, then social values, and lastly about race. That may seem like backward priorities, given the way race has recently dominated film culture (race keeps coming up, always as a controversy). But the order of the film&#8217;s interests suggests Costner&#8217;s integrity regarding showbiz moralizing.

It is through the middle-aged attorney&#8217;s responsibility for a young girl&#8217;s education, grooming, and well-being that Black or White conveys facts of equality, acts of loving. Ethnic difference becomes a dilemma when Elliot is brought to court by the child&#8217;s paternal grandmother Rowena (Octavia Spencer), a black working-class woman from L.A.&#8217;s inner city, who makes a counter-demand for custody. Elliot is confronted by race problems that he has managed to avoid, being protected by his class advantages, but they are imposed by society&#8217;s ideological pressure.

Writer-director Mike Binder contrives trial scenes with an Oprah-like judge and a subplot about Rowena&#8217;s son Reggie (Andre Holland), the junkie who changed Elliot&#8217;s family structure then failed his duties as both son and father. But these scenes are not totally conventional; there&#8217;s a complex, Jacksonian ethic to Rowena&#8217;s warm matriarchal family life (when she brings Eloise&#8217;s cousins for a pool party at Elliot&#8217;s mansion, it idealizes the public-pool controversy of Terence Howard&#8217;s fact-based civil-rights film Pride) juxtaposed with Elliot&#8217;s law-team strategy (a Southern-accented lawyer advises, &#8220;We can get uglier than they can&#8221;).

The historical echoes of these scenes are cleverly updated when Elliot vents his anger to Reggie (&#8220;Goddam crackhead inconsiderate asshole, heh, heh&#8221;) and when Rowena tells Reggie, &#8220;Pull yourself together!&#8221; adding violent emphasis. Elliot&#8217;s humor and Rowena&#8217;s anger display a dual exasperation that authenticates Black or White, making it the first movie to dramatize the modern phenomenon of grandparents stressed with guardianship when the intermediate generation has failed &#8212; a national, even global, phenomenon of family strain and social breakdown that politicians rarely address.

Instead of appealing to the politically correct fallacies of Selma and 12 Years a Slave (where mere topicality passes for complexity), this film reminds Americans of the humanity they have in common. Even its hoariest cliché (a white being saved by a ne&#8217;er-do-well black) supplies a sink-or-swim metaphor that appeals to the audience&#8217;s best thoughts. Black or White doesn&#8217;t sanction white or black self-pity. It de-sensationalizes Hollywood&#8217;s hot-topics habits. Even Elliot and Rowena&#8217;s interpersonal tension (his drunkenness versus her overbearing righteousness) comically balances their particular generational tension. Emphasizing character over easily exploitable social and racial topics is a sign of Costner and Binder&#8217;s sense of decency.

Decency is what we&#8217;ve lost in the current era, when filmmakers try to shame audiences into praising the exacerbation of our nation&#8217;s historical racial tensions. (That&#8217;s why Black or White was dismissed in the current Oscar race; despite a one-week qualifying release last December, it lacked Selma&#8217;s trendiness.) Costner&#8217;s career includes many films (Dances with Wolves, Field of Dreams, The War, Thirteen Days, Tin Cup, 3000 Miles to Graceland, Swing Vote) with respectable humanist perspectives. Here, Costner and Binder articulate the issue of racial identity as a universal concern but, again in the spirit of Jackson, with a personal solution.

It takes bravery like Jackson&#8217;s for Costner and Binder to go up against the strange phenomena of whites who no longer believe in themselves but assume guilt, and of blacks who assume entitlement. Both are typically disingenuous and untrustworthy progressive positions on racial problems, as in Selma. (Mpho Kaoho playing a polyglot African immigrant who tutors Eloise and says, &#8220;I don&#8217;t watch television. I&#8217;m afraid for me it is not a nourishing form of entertainment&#8221; ,may be a satire on this Obama-era tendency. It was Costner&#8217;s Swing Vote that had the immortal joke &#8220;I can&#8217;t be racist; I voted for Obama.&#8221;)

In tribute to Michael Jackson&#8217;s dream, Rowena&#8217;s bid for family ethnic continuity is no more valid than Elliot&#8217;s; securing his granddaughter&#8217;s happiness doesn&#8217;t need defense. For that very humane reason, Elliot can meet unfounded accusations of racism with startling, confident honesty: &#8220;How am I supposed to respond to that?&#8221; Costner&#8217;s authenticity is part of his finest film work in years.
 

Paris78

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Michael and Janet Jackson - "SCREAM" Remake - Willdabeast Adams and Janelle Ginestra

Willdabeast Adams: "This piece represents the world in my eyes. It reminds me of the times I spent with my late step mom singing Jackson songs, the madness the world goes through everyday, the pressure we feel as people by people, and the huge inspirations the Jackson's were to me. We re created the real video. My goal was accomplished with the help of many. Hope you enjoy. R.I.P. MJ the greatest there ever was ! Thank you guys for watching."

 

Doggone

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Michael and Janet Jackson - "SCREAM" Remake - Willdabeast Adams and Janelle Ginestra

Willdabeast Adams: "This piece represents the world in my eyes. It reminds me of the times I spent with my late step mom singing Jackson songs, the madness the world goes through everyday, the pressure we feel as people by people, and the huge inspirations the Jackson's were to me. We re created the real video. My goal was accomplished with the help of many. Hope you enjoy. R.I.P. MJ the greatest there ever was ! Thank you guys for watching."


I can't say it enough... Such a shame that both Scream and TDCAU didn't get the attention and credits they deserve. Both have a strong message in the song. Are people really that ignorant not to listen to his message?
Glad to see that there are still few people that appreciate these 2 songs!
 

Antwort

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^^^ I think the purpose of the thread is to show that more and more people are starting to appreciate Michael's art at its true worth. They may not be quite as many as we would like them to be, but it is still a definite improvement on the cold rejection and indifference of past decades.

I hadn't noticed this thread when it initially began; I was a bit occupied with other issues at the time, but today it definitely grabbed my attention. I'm sorry the multi-quote option doesn't seem to be working, so I can properly acknowledge some of the posts that stood out for me. Apologies in advance for that and also for the length of my intervention.

MJ saw the injustice and tried to make people care... - sadly no one cared 20 years ago - and look where we are now.

MJ really put focus on some very very important issues. But sadly people spent more time debating if MJ got a nose job, sang som antisimetic lyrics, chaged his colour or other ridiculous stuff...

But even though it comes 20 years late it is great to see that people now realize the strengh, power, meaning and message of the song and uses it in a great way.

It is a shame only now, two decades later, some people are realizing the awesome importance of the messages in Michael's songs, but, like they say........better late than never. What may be even more tragic is the idea that sentiments of righteous anger in the face of injustice as those expressed in TDCAU and We've had enough or worry about the state of the planet such as Earth Song seem to be even more appropriate for today's world than for the one when they were originally written.

Someone quoted a few of them terribly poignant questions in Will you be there? and rightfully noted how most of the world turned its back on Michael in his darkest hours. Thankfully, that wasn't true of everyone. Speaking strictly from my own experience I can say that I was there in 1993 long before there was any internet, I was there in 2005 before there was any Twitter or Facebook and I am here now.

But when I go beyond the tiny sphere which is my life I realize there are people out there who have been admiring Michael's work decades before I was even born, so I don't think loyalty and respect should be measured by time. I think we should be thankful for anyone and everyone who pays attention to Michael's messages &#8211; whether they've been doing it since 1969 or 2009, 1984 or 2014 is irrelevant.......just as long as they finally get it.

If Michael's music can be used as a force for change, then I'm all for it, and I'm sure he would be too. It's sad that it seems like society has taken a step back into the dark ages, or at least that's how the media portrays it because there's a lot of good out there too. We need more songs like Heal the World.

I'm convinced he would be honored to see his art used in such positive and non-violent ways, as a catalyst for change and social outcry. Also agree with the second part of the message - in spite of all "evidence" to the contrary the world is still full of wonder, light and works of good done by men and women of many nations and diverse spiritual backgrounds. Just because their actions are not news-worthy, it doesn't mean they don't exist.

so glad to see that many of MJ fans reacted to that article and thanked the author, that he replied one MJ fan saying he was asked to do another piece

You can check his reply to Justice4Some twitter 6 hours ago
https://twitter.com/andjustice4some/with_replies

If we give positive attention (clicks) to proper articles, we get more proper articles of MJ.

What a great idea. I know most people within the MJ community are distrustful of journalists and they may very well be entitled to their skepticism considering the awful treatment so much of the media has subjected Michael to all along the decades. However, I do believe that those who are engaged in honest journalism and truly fair and balanced coverage ought to be awarded and recognized as such.


school_st_elem_talent10_full.jpg


This picture is sooo sweet. It is marvelous to see children being inspired by Michael. Scenes like these certify the staying power of his example and art and that can only be a reason for rejoicing.

Very few people may relate to the isolation that comes from being a child star growing up in front of the world, but anyone who has truly felt the sting of loneliness will find themselves in the words and notes of Stranger in Moscow. Not many people may be misjudged by the world with the help of the tabloid media, but anyone who has suffered or witnessed any form of injustice will resonate with the message in TDCAU. Not everyone may have traveled the world over as Michael did, but anyone who cares deeply about the future of the planet cannot help but listen and be inspired by Earth Song or Heal the world. Not many guys may have bodyguards and fans, but plenty of men in love now and in the future will relate to the lyrics of This is it, For all time or You are not alone. Not many people may be able to master the moonwalk, but crowds in their thousands have shown they can learn the Thriller routine.

And I think it is in this very mixture that the strength and the endurance of Michael's total body of work stands. His catalog is made of just about every type of song, from the socially and politically-aware to the "silly" little love songs and it includes everything from humanitarian anthems to groovy beats, killer moves and creative videos. There truly is something for everyone and therein lies the universality of his appeal. That is why it is my firm belief his art, and above all, his message will long outlive any of his detractors and the lies said about him.

Let me now return to the song and the source of the thread and the most expressive of the two versions of the video. I completely agree with the person who said they favored this to the Brazilian one; this one is far more effective in relaying the message of the song.

[video=youtube;t1pqi8vjTLY]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1pqi8vjTLY&feature=youtu.be[/video]

Leaving the strength and the poignancy of the message aside, can we talk for a second of just how great he looked? :D I don't know about any other girl, but for me there is something completely mesmerizing about a foineee man fighting for causes greater than even his mighty self; a fine man fighting for silly little things the cynics of the world don't believe in: truth, justice, romance...... I can think of very few things on this earth more appealing than that, perhaps none. Not even gold and shiny pants can outdo that. :cheeky:
 
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HIStory

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They Don't Really Care About Us. Baltimore. #FreddieGray

https://vine.co/v/eaE57QlPjUe


This song has become the anthem for those suffering injustice.

I AM AN AFRIKAN &#8207;@NtrMK1 Apr 15
Michael Jackson: They Don't Really Care About Us. This is the song that comes to mind in this difficult time. #StopAfroPhobia

&#8220;They Don&#8217;t Really Care About Us&#8221;will make you angry because its all about how bad it gets in the world forthose that don&#8217;t get to be born on a bed of roses
Micahel Jackson didn&#8217;t really makes messy songs. Most ofthem were immensely catchy, but this one was more about making a point. It wasone of the most controversial pieces of his entire repetoire, villified forbeing anti-Semitic because of the line &#8220; Jew me, sue me, everybody do me/Kick me, **** me, don&#8217;t you black or white me&#8221;. Jackson claimed that heintended to counter racism by claiming the pointlessness of all racistassumption and discrimination. Use of racist terms was intended, as he claimed,to denounce them. He wanted to use the terms in a way that dismantled themrather than add to their power.

Plenty of critics stated that if that was his intention, heshould have done more to make it clear. Its an impossibly catchy song,featuring one of the most recognizable beats in the world. And it makes one ofthe toughest statements - the people in power don&#8217;t care about us little peoplewho don&#8217;t hold generational power. Its a song for the oppressed, for theunderdog that the people in power are always looking to hurt. Its the song thatyou revolt to, and when you listen, it tells you the side of the story that thebig guns always try to cover up.

http://skore.in/post/117055968260/th...-will-make-you

Abdullah Qalalweh &#8207;@MecQalalweh 23h23 hours ago
"They Don't Care About Us" Michael Jackson's song, I think it still working these day


Idont Carefor You @hillcVlt · Apr 18

1995 Michael Jackson put out "They don't really care about us". Been 20 years since and all the lyrics still apply without missing a beat.



D.B.Anderson @DBAnderson1 · Apr 22

When an MJ song is used to protest, u know its real. #theydontreallycareab outus #NYCProtest #nyc

https://vine.co/v/O6TLwZphITi
 

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TDCAU is now the 2nd most viewed video on his Youtube channel with almost 150m views. Scream is coming up to over 40m (which I suspect will only grow). I don't know how it's doing on other outlets but people are listening and hearing his message. Michael was so honest in his music and spoke from his soul. I think as time goes on his voice will only get stronger, no matter how many groups try to silence it.
 

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Antwort

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Paris78;4088272 said:
#Baltimoreriots 2CELLOS - They Don't Care About Us - Michael Jackson [OFFICIAL VIDEO] https://youtu.be/l-9VZZWtMfQ via @YouTube
[video=youtube;l-9VZZWtMfQ]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-9VZZWtMfQ&feature=youtu.be[/video]

One word: brilliant!



Paris78;4088272 said:
Stereogum @stereogum ·

This Baltimore protester's Michael Jackson dance is your moment of Zen for the morning http://bit.ly/1J6nPuR
CDrukhhWIAEVOaR.jpg:large


http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat...ces_to_michael_jackson_s_be at_it_video.html

The scenes in Baltimore are very sad. If Martin Luther King and Gandhi were living, they would be upset to see them. The righteousness of a cause is best sustained and achieved by non-violent means. People have the right to be angry and to express their disaffection and frustration, but violence is NOT the way to do that. It only hurts the community further. Which is why these scenes with Michael's music, not just TDCAU, are so good to see.

Like someone said

nonviolence.jpg


And maybe next time people will protest while using Heal the world and take some flowers along to give to potentially overzealous policemen.
 
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2CELLOS cover was beautiful but I don't think it was meant to be an anthem of what's going on in USA. Many countries all over the world are in war against their corrupt governments, the social injustice, etc.
 

elusive moonwalker

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times like this always bring out the thugs and the thieves intent on stealing and trashing and using whats going on as a mask

One word: brilliant!





The scenes in Baltimore are very sad. If Martin Luther King and Gandhi were living, they would be upset to see them. The righteousness of a cause is best sustained and achieved by non-violent means. People have the right to be angry and to express their disaffection and frustration, but violence is NOT the way to do that. It only hurts the community further. Which is why these scenes with Michael's music, not just TDCAU, are so good to see.

Like someone said

nonviolence.jpg


And maybe next time people will protest while using Heal the world and take some flowers along to give to potentially overzealous policemen.
 

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MJJJusticeProject @MJJJusticePrjct ·

Michael Jackson's Estate understands HIS INFLUENCE & RELEVANCE is far greater than media wants to portray- RT them.

https://www.facebook.com/michaeljackson
The influence and strength of Michael Jackson&#8217;s message and his music is everywhere&#8230;nowhere more important than with the people in Baltimore during this difficult time.#
[video=youtube;N1t1ZqyPR7c]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1t1ZqyPR7c[/video]


#baltimore : The Michael Jackson impersonator is here! Singing "Come Together." https://instagram.com/p/2EQUU_njo4/
CDtPnblVAAA9X19.jpg:large
 
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