Puppy mills-close all of them please

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[video=youtube;oJIAwSlTtYw]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJIAwSlTtYw[/video]

adopt don´t shop
 

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Nathan Winograd
16 april kl. 18:56 ·
On July 1, the last remaining puppy mill-fueled pet store will close in Sarasota, FL. The store owners sued the City after it passed a law banning the retail sale of commercially-bred animals in pet stores. Of the three pet stores in the City, one closed, one began offering rescued animals for adoption, and the third sued. The City announced the case has been settled because the owners are giving up their fight and will not renew their lease when it expires at the end of June: http://bit.ly/2VMmarn.

Lawsuits like this are not uncommon following pet store ban ordinances, but they invariably lose. Courts uphold the right of municipalities to increase the number of rescued animals in need of homes who find them and to strike to the heart of so much animal suffering. Commercial breeding mills fuel inbreeding, provide minimal to no veterinary care, lack of adequate food and shelter, lack of human socialization, overcrowded cages, and cause neglect, abuse, and the killing of animals when they are no longer profitable: http://bit.ly/2UDUybq.

In a bid to overcome these arguments, pet store associations have tried a new tactic: hiring the former CEO of the ASPCA. In a lawsuit against another municipality that also passed a ban at roughly the same time, Ed Sayres argued that pet stores protect public safety by offering “safe” dogs for purchase. Shelter dogs, he claimed, are particularly and peculiarly dangerous, calling them a bigger threat to the lives of Americans than “jihadi terrorists” and “far-right terrorists”: http://bit.ly/2GfUQeu. Studies prove otherwise (and to the contrary): http://bit.ly/2UDUybq and http://bit.ly/2UDT2WB, as do the experiences of successful shelter directors who note that, “the percentage of truly aggressive dogs... in small to very large shelters is well under one quarter of 1%”: nokilladvocacycenter.org/behavior-dogs.html.

Sayres also testified that “there is no connection between [puppy mills…] and retail pet stores,” despite copious evidence to the contrary: http://bit.ly/2UDUybq.

Thankfully, courts are not listening, upholding bans in various cities.

Legislators are not listening. Since then, California and Maryland both banned the retail sale of milled dogs and cats (and rabbits). Other states, including New York, are trying to do the same.

People are listening less and less, too. A new pet industry report finds that the amount spent to purchase animals declined by 4.3% and is “the smallest area of total pet industry spend”: https://goo.gl/Y7wNB9. (Not surprisingly, as fewer people are buying animals, overall adoption rates have increased with shelter deaths falling to below two million across the U.S. for the first time and as low as 1.5 million by some estimates).

And even some pet store owners have stopped listening. "I think you do have some social responsibility as a pet store," said a Tampa, FL, pet store owner. "I think adoption is the best route. Obviously there's a lot of dogs out there that need homes”: https://goo.gl/Z1xs5t.
 

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The biggest single improvement to animal welfare in 20 years’: Puppy farms to be outlawed in WA
PerthNow
February 10, 2020 4:25AM
Puppy farms will be outlawed and the purchase of puppies from pet shops banned under new laws to be introduced to the Western Australian Parliament.

Premier Mark McGowan has committed to ending over-breeding and the operations of illegal breeders.

The legislation will also track dogs throughout their lives using a central registration system and will give authorities power to shut down dodgy or illegal breeders.

“Dogs are an important part of many families in Western Australia. We want to make sure they are looked after and treated well throughout their lives,” Mr McGowan said in a statement.

“The new laws will mean dogs can be traced throughout their lives through a central registration system, allowing authorities to identify dodgy or illegal breeders and shut down their operations.

“We will also be providing assistance to pet shops to help them transition to dog and puppy adoption centres meaning they can re-home displaced and abandoned dogs.”
Maylands MLA and Puppy Farming Working Group chair Lisa Baker said the legislation will make the state’s dogs and puppies safer, reduce the opportunity for illegal puppy farming and encourage better welfare for all dogs.

“It supports good breeding practices and responsible pet ownership,” she said.

Western Australians will be able to trust that the dogs and puppies they are bringing into their homes have not come from illegal puppy farms, and, if necessary, can be traced back to the person who bred them.”

The RSPCA said the new laws were the biggest single improvement to animal welfare in WA for 20 years.

“It is now up to every dog lover in WA to let their local member of parliament know that these reforms are important to ensure the legislation is passed quickly,” the organisation said.

“The sooner the legislation comes into law, the sooner it will help prevent some of the suffering and cruelty to dogs.”
https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/wa...ZBeY8n-n_ZgjhjA5cu-NxNLm8DYyvh0839E4wxDPKqLcQ
 

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Lucy’s Law: Vets reveal the true cost of puppy and kitten farms
‘Petfished’ campaign urges people to spot ‘red flags’ when buying a puppy or kitten ahead of ban on third party sales - ‘Lucy’s Law’ coming into force on 6 April

Stark new findings reveal that buying a pet from a low-welfare breeder could cost pet owners an extra £5,000 in vet bills over just 12 months, as a new government campaign is launched urging people to take simple steps to research the seller before buying a puppy or kitten.

More than half of vets surveyed (54%) said that the poor conditions of puppy or kitten farms can lead to illnesses and complications which would incur treatment costs of over £1,500 in the first year of the animal’s life.
In some severe cases, the costs could rise to £5,000 or even result in the pet being euthanised.

These new figures demonstrate the extent of suffering for both owner and pet caused by puppy farms and third party puppy and kitten sales as the trade relies on a high-volume, low-welfare model.

The government has already changed the law to ban commercial third party puppy and kitten sales, known as Lucy’s Law, and is going further to improve the lives of animals including supporting a Private Member’s Bill to raise the maximum penalty for animal cruelty from six months to five years, and consulting on tackling excessively long journeys for live animals.

Today’s launch of a government campaign will call on the public to also play their part to tackle the cruel trade of puppies and kittens by encouraging prospective owners to be aware of illegal, low-welfare breeders and look for ‘red flags’ when buying a new pet.
This will help to disrupt the demand for these animals and further suffocate the trade alongside the introduction of Lucy’s Law. The campaign, called ‘Petfished’, outlines the deceitful tactics pet sellers use to trick buyers and sell their animals to line their pockets.

Christine Middlemiss, UK Chief Veterinary Officer, said:

Vets see the tragic effects of ‘Petfishing’ first-hand but so too do the public who may be put through the pain and cost of looking after, and even losing, a sick puppy or kitten due to the conditions it was bred in.

It’s vital that prospective pet owners take responsibility for where they get their pets from and avoid puppy-farms and unscrupulous dealers.
The campaign launched today sets out the simple steps that can be taken by the public to spot the warning signs and ensure their puppy or kitten is given the best start in life.

Animal Welfare Minister, Lord Goldsmith, said:

I am delighted that a ban on third party sales of puppies and kittens is coming into force – it is a crucial piece of legislation that will help us tackle the abhorrent and heart-breaking trade of pets.

Our campaign will help raise awareness of the dangers associated with buying pets online and deceitful sellers. The animals reared on puppy farms are often in awful conditions which can lead to chronic health problems, behavioural issues, and, in the most tragic cases, death. This simply has to stop and the public can do its bit to help.

We urge anyone thinking about getting a pet to do the right thing.
Do thorough research and ensure you go to a reputable breeder in the UK – don’t get ‘Petfished’.

The poor conditions suffered by puppies and kittens include early separation from their mothers, huge numbers of animals cramped in unhygienic spaces, and the likelihood of long journeys from the place they were bred to their new home. All of these can contribute to an increased risk of disease and behavioural issues.

Our survey of vets showed the need to inform prospective pet owners of the issues attached with buying from disreputable breeders, with all questioned saying the public need clear advice on how to buy pets responsibly.

The campaign launched today urges people to ask themselves ‘Who’s the person behind the pet?’.
It introduces a new phrase ‘Petfished’ - much like ‘Catfished’, when someone is lured into a relationship by a fictional online persona, it refers to deceitful pet sellers who use a similar tactic to trick buyers, mistreating animals and selling them at high-volume to line their pockets.

On 6 April 2020, the ban on commercial third party puppy and kitten sales – known as Lucy’s Law – will come into force in England. The ban will help to crack down on puppy farms by disrupting the supply-chain of low-welfare breeders which relies on third party sales. This new legislation, married with the ‘Petfished’ campaign which seeks crack-down on the public’s demand for this trade, is further evidence of the government’s commitment to improving the welfare of the nation’s much-loved pets.

Anyone looking to buy a pet can get tips and advice on the new website: getyourpetsafely.campaign.gov.uk

Claire Horton CBE, Battersea Chief Executive said:

Battersea strongly condemns the practice of puppy farming that puts profit ahead of basic animal welfare. Separated from their mother too early, sold for a vast profit and too easily bought on impulse, these pets can suffer lifelong health problems as a result of such early mistreatment.

No pet owner wants to find themselves taken in by ‘petfishers’ and end up having to make potentially heart-breaking choices, so we welcome Defra’s new campaign which will provide much-needed advice on how to buy a pet responsibly. We also encourage anyone thinking about getting a new dog or cat to visit their local rescue centre where they can also gain helpful advice about whether a puppy or kitten is the right choice for them.

RSPCA Inspector Callum Issit, who appears in the Petfished short film, said:

There’s always been a high consumer demand for puppies and kittens and sadly there are people out there who try and meet this demand by prioritising quick cash profits at the expense of animal welfare.

Puppy farming in particular is a disturbing industrial-scale attempt to meet this demand and the low-welfare conditions and animal illnesses this leads to are distressing.

Some of the worse cases I’ve seen have resulted from so-called ‘back-yard’ kitten breeders removing a kitten from its mother too early with little chance of survival or hundreds of puppies kept together in their own faeces with matted fur.

It’s important the public remain vigilant. If you suspect foul play at any stage when researching and buying your pet, report the seller immediately to the RSPCA or your local authority to help us stop this.
If you’re looking for a new pet to join your family please consider giving a rescue animal a new home.

People should follow these tips to help spot warning signs that a puppy or kitten has been raised in low welfare conditions:

Research. Have a look at the seller’s profile and search their name online.
If they are advertising many litters from different breeds, then this is a red flag.
Check contact details.
Copy and paste the phone number into a search engine.
If the number is being used on lots of different adverts, sites and dates then this is likely a deceitful seller.
Check the animal’s age.
Puppies and kittens should never be sold under 8 weeks old – do not buy from anyone advertising a puppy or kitten younger than 8 weeks.
Check the animal’s health records. Make sure the seller shares all records of vaccinations, flea and worm treatment and microchipping with you before sale.
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/lucys-law-vets-reveal-the-true-cost-of-puppy-and-kitten-farms
 

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Officials probe arrival of 500 puppies, 38 of them dead, aboard flight from Ukraine
Canadians’ taste for exotic breeds fuelling global black market, say animal welfare advocates
Dave Seglins, Carly Thomas · CBC News · Posted: Jun 20, 2020 7:18 AM ET | Last Updated: June 20


Flight from Ukraine containing hundreds of dogs; dozens of them dead

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is investigating after the gruesome discovery of dozens of dead and dying dogs aboard a recent flight from Ukraine.

The CFIA confirms that a Ukranian International Airlines flight arrived at Toronto's Pearson International Airport from Kyiv last Saturday with approximately 500 French bulldog puppies on board, dozens of them dead and dozens more dehydrated and seriously ill.

"Upon inspection, it was found that 38 were dead on arrival," a spokesperson wrote in a statement.

"CFIA officials are currently investigating the circumstances surrounding this incident and will determine next steps once the investigation is complete."

Abby Lorenzen, a professional show dog handler, who happened to be at the cargo area of the Toronto airport to pick up a different animal, described the scene as a "horror show."

"It was just a nightmare," Lorenzen told CBC News.

"Canada and the federal government need to change the laws on the importation of these puppies," she said.

At the airport in Kyiv, witnesses at the loading area became suspicious last Saturday and recorded video of what appears to be men loading stacks of animal crates filled with puppies bound for Toronto.

That video is now circulating on social media, but the airline won't discuss why it allowed more than 500 animals on one flight

Ukrainian International Airlines declined to answer questions from CBC News but released a short statement Friday.

"Everyone at UIA offers its condolences for the tragic loss of animal life on our flight," the company said via social media. "UIA is working with local authorities to determine what happened and to make any changes necessary to prevent such a situation from occurring again."

UIA is a member of IATA (International Air Transport Association), which has voluntary codes that are supposed to restrict and ensure the safe transport of live animals. For instance, most Canadian carriers only allow two animal crates per flight and refuse to fly with caged animals if temperatures exceed 29.5 C.

Smuggling, fake documents
Animal welfare advocates say the Toronto incident is just the latest in a series where flights from Ukraine and Eastern Europe are crammed with very young puppies destined for resale to unwitting owners.

"These commercial operations are run by large puppy mills that house and breed hundreds and thousands of dogs every year in typically unsterile conditions where the dogs are crammed together," said Lucas Hixson of SPCA International in an interview from Slavutych, Ukraine, where he works with a rescue group Dogs of Chernobyl.


Mass puppy mills in Eastern Europe are thriving due to poor international regulations, says Lucas Hixson of SPCA International. (Submitted by Lucas Hixson)
"Traditionally for international animal transport you will not have space in the cargo hold for hundreds of animals," said Hixson, who believes the flight was organized puppy smuggling.

"This commercial operation specifically chartered this plane to increase their bottom line, thereby putting those animals at risk."

Officials in the U.S. have turned away flights and have documented numerous cases of mass imports by covert groups using faked papers and forged vaccination records to circumvent import restrictions.


News of puppy deaths on a crammed Ukrainian flight went viral after witness Abby Lorenzen posted images on social media. (Submitted by Abby Lorenzen)
CFIA insists "Canada has rigorous standards for animal imports in order to protect Canadian animals from the introduction of serious animal diseases. All import requirements must be met before an animal is imported."

However, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) is studying the current federal regulations out of concern for diseases spread by exotic pet imports, says Prof. Scott Weese of the University of Guelph.

"We really have no idea [what] the scope of the issue is. We have no idea how many dogs come in, where they go, where they come from," said Weese, who is working with PHAC on the study.

Weese says based on online ads on Kijiji or Craigslist, there is a lucrative market for the sale of puppies that most buyers likely believe are bred here in Canada.

"It is a big industry. There's no doubt about it. And it's been looked at more in the U.S. and there's potentially some organized crime component of it, too, in some areas," he said.

"There are lucrative situations where you can buy large numbers of dogs fairly cheaply. You mentioned 500 French bull dogs. If those are going for sale at $3,000 to $4,000 a dog, that's a massive amount of money."
 

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7 reasons to adopt your next best friend

The best thing you can do to combat cruel puppy factories just happens to also be the most rewarding.
Adopting is the most effective way to break the cruel puppy factory supply chain — and by offering your heart and home to a rescued animal, you'll not only be enriching your life — but saving theirs!

If you’re thinking about extending your family with a four-legged friend, here are seven great reasons to adopt from a rescue group or shelter:

1 They’ll help you find your soul mate.

All good rescue groups have an application process to ensure that you’ll be perfectly matched with your new friend — think of them as matchmakers! By finding out more about you, your living arrangements and lifestyle, they can match you up with the paw-fect candidate. The ultimate aim for pet rescue and adoption organisations is to find loving – and permanent – homes for the animals in their care. This means that both the animal and their new human companion need to be suited to each other. So the more information you can provide, the better you can assist in helping them help you find your four-legged soul mate!


2 You’re helping to break the cruel puppy factory cycle.

As long as animals are purchased from pet shops and online, cruel puppy factories will continue to exist. Don't let them take advantage of unwitting people — or subject dogs to lives of misery — in order to make a quick buck! Adopting from a rescue group or shelter is the simplest way to take a stand against puppy factory cruelty!

3 You’re saving someone who really needs it.

Rescue groups, foster networks and animal shelters help animals who have been forgotten, abandoned or given up on through no fault of their own. These animals ask for little more than the chance to share their lives with someone who loves them — especially those who have never been given the chance before. By adopting from a rescue group, you’ll not only be making a friend for life — you’ll be saving one.

4 They help every breed in need.

From border collies to bull dogs, burmese to british shorthair – not to mention rabbits, guinea pigs, ferrets and just about every companion animal you can think of ... you can expect to see more than just mix-breed dogs and cats behind the wire of your local pound or shelter. Tragically, all types of companion animals are victims of cruelty and abandonment. All dog and cat breeds (indeed, all companion animals!) desire – and deserve – a loving home. So make adoption your first option whenever you're in search of a new four-legged or feathered friend for life.

Due to the sheer volume of purebred and ‘designer’ dogs in need – many of whom would likely have come from puppy factories – volunteers have established groups with the aim of assisting these dogs with finding their forever homes. For a list of rescue groups facilitating rescue and adoption in Australia, check out Savour Life's 'Adopt a Dog' responsible adoption site, PetRescue’s rehoming directory, or head over to The Rescue Network to view listings of dogs (and cats!) across Australia.


5 Your adoption fee goes back into helping more animals.

Good rescue groups will ensure that any dogs, puppies, cats and kittens adopted out will come vaccinated, desexed, wormed and microchipped — all of which is included in the adoption fee. Often, animals are cared for by dedicated, volunteer foster carers until their forever home can be found. This allows for them to be properly assessed in a home environment — which can be really helpful if you already live with animals or children, as foster carers can provide helpful insight on the behaviour of animals in their care. So your money is not only going towards making sure your new friend is happy and healthy, but you'll be giving it back to an organisation so that they can save more lives. You can't get a better deal than that!

6 They give oldies another chance.

Older animals are tragically often the last to be chosen — and the first to be euthanised. Senior dogs and cats can find it particularly difficult to cope in strange environments like shelters and pounds, but thankfully there are rescue groups assisting in the transport and foster care of these special animals, with the aim of getting them into more suitable environments — and matching them with someone who can provide the love and friendship they are only too happy to return. We like to think of older dogs and cats as 'friendship experts' — after all, they've got years of experience behind them!


7 You’ll be saving more than one life.

Every time an animal is adopted to a forever home, a place is opened up in the rescue and foster care network for another animal in need. So when you take your bestie home from a rescue group, they’ll be able to start the rescue cycle over again with another lucky animal. One kind act = two saved lives!
 

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Animals Australia
17 h ·
What happened to Strawberry should never have happened. But this callous treatment of mother dogs, seen as nothing more than breeding machines, will continue until the puppy farm industry is stamped out.
In a matter of weeks, a bill will go before WA Parliament to make the sale of puppies in pet shops illegal. Pet shops and online trading sites are two of the major income streams for cruel puppy farmers — so in addition to making sure you NEVER buy animals from pet shops or online, please join our friends from Oscar's Law in calling on politicians to support the bill �� https://bit.ly/302y7x0

https://www.facebook.com/9NewsPerth/videos/985201698650092

Strawberry's story
She wasn't even a year old yet but to this puppy farm, she was just another production unit and she was impregnated anyway. Still a puppy herself, she gave birth to three pups who were sent across the country to a pet shop in a fancy WA suburb.
Strawberry was then left to languish with dead puppies inside of her. "She was basically rotting from the inside out".
If you know anyone thinking of buying a puppy online or from a pet shop— tell them Strawberry's story.
 

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It looks clean but it´s still not a good environment for puppies to grow up in.
=youtube;l263Csw9VIE]
Adopt, don´t shop!
 
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Spaniel Aid UK

"We received this message from a failed foster adoptor yesterday. Please please please check out where you are getting puppies from. I see so many posts saying oh I thought it was a dodgy place but my puppy is ok . But what about the poor mum left behind to churn out litter after litter
😫
🤬

FF Dolly went for her spay yesterday but the operation had to be aborted when the vet realised that most of her internal organs were attached after several botched C Sections that were clearly not performed by a vet.
She’s home to recover and I have details of a specialist to see if they can put right what they puppy farmer has done to her.
Apparently in all their years they’ve never seen anything like it and she was sewn up by something that looked like string."
 
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