What about elephants

MIST

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Posted: 28 February 2013
Across Africa, elephants are being slaughtered by poachers in record numbers -- and their tusks hacked off with chainsaws -- to make luxury items, statues and trinkets in Asia. But in days, Thailand will host a key global summit on illegal trade in endangered species, giving us a rare chance to stop this futile massacre.

Thailand is the world’s largest unregulated ivory market and a top driver of the illegal trade.They’ve been in the hot seat for years, yet so far little has been done to clamp down on their role in the elephant attack. But Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra has just announced that she is considering a full ivory ban. That's why we started a global petition on the Avaaz site, to give this campaign the last push it needs to win.


This is the best chance we’ve had in years to have a meaningful victory for Africa’s elephants -- we just need to put people power behind it. Join me now to stop the bloody ivory trade. Sign the urgent petition and share it with everyone.


- Leonardo DiCaprio

http://avaaz.org/en/save_the_elephants/?leo
 

MIST

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"With support from WWF Board Member Leonardo DiCaprio, the campaigning group Avaaz.org and all of you, we helped secure a commitment from Thailand's prime minister to end the trade of ivory in Thailand.

Yesterday, Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra stood before a crowded hall of delegates attending an international wildlife trade meeting and told the world that she would take steps to end the ivory trade in her country. This commitment would close a major global loophole that contributes to tens of thousands of elephant deaths every year.

It was a decision that did not come easily, and would not have happened if not for you. You were part of a 1.4 million-strong petition urging her to stand up for elephants and ban Thai ivory trade.

This is an enormous step forward in the fight to stop wildlife crime.

WWF will continue to work to ensure that today's promise becomes a reality. We are urging the Thai government to provide a detailed timeline outlining the steps they will take to follow through on this pledge.

I urge you to take a moment to read more at worldwildlife.org about the historic decision that you helped to make happen."
 

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Big celebs like Leonardo DiCaprio, Edward Norton and Blink-182's Mark Hoppus took to Twitter to fight for a great cause.

They began tweeting on behalf of the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), hoping to make them "fan favorite" for the Google Global Impact Award.

Guess what happened…
When you combine lots of celebs, with their millions of followers, you get the ZSL an over $700,000 grant from Google!!

That's right! They won!

The ZSL is going to install cameras with automated sensors near poaching hotspots at Tsavo National Park in Kenya.

This will literally save hundreds of animals because the high-tech cameras can even detect vehicles vibrations and triangulate the sound of gunshots!!

The director of fundraising for ZSL said:

"It’s fantastic to have won this important Google grant, and we couldn’t have done it without the overwhelming support from our VIP friends and the public. These life-saving cameras will help stop the slaughter of rhinos, elephants, and more, before it’s too late."

It's predicted that poaching will go down 50% at the park within the next two years because of the cameras!!

That's so incredible!! Way to go, Leo and friends!!

http://perezhilton.com/teddyhilton/...t-to-stop-poachers-google-global-impact-award
 

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Calls for an investigation are mounting as a heart wrenching video gains attention online. It shows an aged circus elephant drowning in a river, while her owner’s brother jumps and cavorts on her as she helplessly flails under water and dies.

The ill-fated 48-year-old circus elephant, Madi, was a star attraction at Daniel Renz’s traveling show, Universal Circus Renz. The German circus was on tour in Estonia when this incident occurred in early June. Bystanders captured the entire event on video.

It’s clear from the footage that Madi was old and frail. According to animal rights activist group Pro Wildlife, Madi was too old and too frail to keep touring with this circus, a fact they reportedly told Renz previously.

Madi apparently had been taken to a river in the town of Narva, Estonia, for a bath. In the video, Madi at first appears to be enjoying the water, flipping it up across her back with her trunk. Her joy quickly evaporates, however, when she loses her footing and falls into the water onto her side.

The next few harrowing minutes of video show a man identified as Rene Renz, brother of owner Daniel Renz, immediately leaping upon Madi’s submerged body. He perches on her, alternately standing and jumping on Madi’s side. He even dives off her flank into the water and then climbs back on for more hijinks.

The man makes no obvious effort to help her regain her feet or to lift her head or trunk high enough to allow her to breathe. He makes no pleas for assistance. Indeed, it would appear that his sitting, standing and jumping on Madi likely made it impossible for her to right herself and stand up.

No help arrives, despite a number of people watching from the riverbank. Within minutes, Madi drifts further into deeper water and dies. A collection of bystanders pulls her body to shore, where the man identified as Renz leaps upon her yet again. Later, photos show that heavy machinery lifted her body into a dump truck and hauled Madi away.


Prior to Madi’s death, at least four complaints were filed asking Estonian officials to investigate allegations that she suffered from abuse and ill-treatment at the hands of the Renz circus. While the Renz circus was in the town of Talinn, protestors claimed Madi had been punched. During her stay in Talinn, Madi appeared “old and weary“ according to the director of the Talinn Zoo.

Other concerns may prompt investigation of this heartbreaking incident as well. There are reports that Madi was wild-born. Estonia and Germany are signatories to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), which would presumably make the Renz family’s use of a wild-born Indian elephant a violation of the CITES prohibition on using endangered or threatened species in circuses.

The Estonian press reports that veterinary officials conducted an inspection of Madi’s living conditions and health on May 17. They determined she was healthy and well fed, and there were no signs of physical abuse.

The veterinarian who examined Madi’s body determined she died of heart failure.

According to the Estonian press, a “61-year-old animal tamer” has been fined 400 euros (about $520) for “mistreatment.” At this point, local authorities are not pursuing criminal charges.


Other videos on YouTube show Madi during a Universal Circus Renz performance and interacting with the public at some sort of outdoor appearance. In this latter video, Madi very obviously does not want to be put back into the big truck used to haul her around.

Madi’s body was buried in a forest near a town called Auvere. So ended the sad life of an old and weary German circus elephant.

When the circus comes to town, remember Madi. It may be easy for some to dismiss this situation as having happened in Estonia, not the United States. But the plight of circus elephants is a worldwide embarrassment, even in the U.S.A. Be mindful of the entertainment you choose to support with your dollars.

Elephants can’t tell you how the circus treats them. In this case, though, the doomed Madi shows you. The video stands as a frank and sobering indictment of the “entertainers” who cared so little for this elephant that she was allowed to die slowly, choking in a river, while bystanders watched and laughed.


Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/heartbr...ile-caretaker-jumps-on-her.html#ixzz2YuV7L3iS

You can see the video in the link
Make a protest
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/220/...busing-an-elderly-elephant/?z00m=20593554#taf
 

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July 18th, 2013 by Deborah Robinson

Long-suffering elephant Nosey is being forced to give rides at the Berlin Fair in Marne, Michigan this week from July 15 through the 20th.

IDA has informed the fair of exhibitor Hugo Liebel’s decades of documented abuse and neglect of Nosey, who he’s now calling Tiny. Now, the fair organizer needs to hear from you.

Liebel was recently fined as the result of USDA charges claiming more than 30 welfare violations for which Liebel had repeatedly been cited between 2007 and 2011. These included failure to provide adequate veterinary care as well as safe handling violations that put Nosey and the public at risk.

In April, Nosey was barred from entering Maine because a TB blood test showed that she carries the antibodies for the disease, and because Liebel had failed to do required follow-up testing.

And now the Berlin Fair is giving Liebel yet another chance to profit from his appalling treatment of Nosey. Nosey is constantly chained except when giving rides or performing unnatural tricks. Her terrible skin condition persists. Liebel’s mishandling presents a constant danger to Nosey and to the public. No fair should support an exhibitor with such a history of contempt for Nosey’s welfare or for laws intended to protect people and animals.

IDA and our members have worked tirelessly on behalf of Nosey for years, and she needs your help again.

Please send a brief, polite email today to:
info@BerlinFair.org, asking them to cancel elephant rides at the festival.

Please use your own words, considering the following suggested points:

•Liebel was recently fined for violations of federal animal welfare law including failure to provide Nosey with adequate veterinary care as well as safe handling violations that put Nosey and the public at risk.

•Liebel continues to mishandle Nosey and threaten her safety and that of fair goers.
•Elephants used for rides, like Nosey, spend their lives in chains and in the tight confinement of trucks and pens, constantly transported around the country.
•Elephants like Nosey are wild animals. Handlers control them through dominance with the bullhook, a steel-tipped weapon similar to a fireplace poker that is used to strike, stab, prod and intimidate elephants into obedience.
•Since 1990, there have been at least 13 deaths and 120 injuries in the U.S. attributed to elephants. Nosey herself has injured a handler.
And please leave polite comments on the fair’s Facebook page, as well.

As always, thank you for all you do for the elephants!

http://www.idausa.org/suffering-elephant-nosey-needs-your-help-today-2/
 

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'Mourning' elephants refuse to leave accident site
Alok K N Mishra, TNN Aug 5, 2013, 01.08AM IST
Tags:Friends|carefulRANCHI: Around 15 elephants, who are mourning a member of their herd after it was was hit by a train near Matari railway station under Dhanbad division of the East Central Railway on Howrah-New Delhi main railway route a couple of days ago, have attacked villages and demolished parts of a school and several houses. Villagers have been keeping night-long vigil, but haven't been to drive away the herd.Wildlife activist D S Srivastava said elephants have a strong sense of family bonding and often resort to revenge attacks. He said: "Elephants often try to return to the site of such accidents as they believe that their mate has only been injured and could be rescued by them. Even when an elephant dies a natural death, their friends cover the body with bushes and small tree branches." Srivastava added that the herd will try to return to this site again and again.

Railway authorities are also concerned and are maintaining a vigil on tracks. "Train drivers have also been asked to be more careful," said Amrendra Das spokesperson for Dhanbad division.

A herd of elephants had stopped several trains on the main Delhi-Howrah route near Matari railway station on Wednesday night after one member of the herd was killed by the Kolkata-Delhi Duronto Express. The elephants left the area only after the railway's disaster management team with foresters arrived on the spot and burst crackers .

The herd, however, did not go very far and were spotted in the Belwatand forests near Srirampur hill on Thursday morning. The foresters gathered experts who are experts in chasing the jumbos and tried to chase them away but they did not go away. In the intervening night of Thursday and Friday they tried to go near Matari railway station where their friend had died. The villagers who had kept a vigil, however, did not allow them to go to the site by bursting crackers and hitting drums. Several houses were damaged in the Belwatand village in the intervening night of Thursday and Friday.

The foresters called in an elephant-chasing squad from Bengal and drove the herd beyond Srirampur hill on Friday afternoon. The herd again tried to visit the spot on Friday night and damaged l houses in Hariktand village, situated on the foothills of Srirampur hill.

Dhanbad DFO Satish Chandra Rai said he has not received any claims for compensation from villagers. "The elephants have damaged some houses here," said Rai. He said the extent of damage would be known only after the villagers' claim compensation. Sources, however, said around 10 houses have been damaged.

The elephants lost a familymember, just like humans they wanted to mourn their loved one
 

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Obama launches initiative to fight elephant, rhino poaching in Africa .
Pres. Barack Obama has signed an executive order aimed at combating wildlife trafficking in Africa, particularly the sale of rhinoceros horns and elephant tusks.

The State Department will provide $10 million to train and assist African authorities fighting the illegal poaching and selling of animals and animal parts.

The World Wildlife Fund says close to 30,000 elephants are slaughtered annually for their ivory. Ivory estimated to weigh more than 23 metric tons - a figure that represents 2,500 elephants - was seized in the 13 largest seizures of illegal ivory in 2011.

"Poaching and trafficking is threatening Africa’s wildlife," said Obama. "Today I issued a new Executive Order to better organize U.S. government efforts in this fight so that we can cooperate with the Tanzanian government and others. This includes an additional millions of dollars to help countries across the regions to build their capacity to meet this challenge.”

“The entire world has a stake in making sure we preserve Africa’s beauty for future generations.”

Poaching operations have expanded beyond small-scale, opportunistic actions to coordinated slaughter commissioned by armed and organized criminal syndicates, the executive order says.

"The survival of protected wildlife species such as elephants, rhinos, great apes, tigers, sharks, tuna, and turtles has beneficial economic, social, and environmental impacts that are important to all nations."

The World Wildlife Fund called Obama's action "groundbreaking."

“President Obama’s commitment to help stop the global crime wave that is emptying the continent’s forests and savannas is welcome news. It gives a critical boost for everyone involved in fighting wildlife trafficking—from rangers on the ground to local conservation groups to decision-makers around the globe,” said Carter Roberts, President & CEO of WWF-US.

WWF says wildlife crime has direct links to regional conflicts, national security and even terrorism.

http://www.king5.com/news/environme...afficking-initiative-in-Africa-213887741.html
 

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US to destroy ivory stocks in effort to stop illegal elephant poaching

White House to crush 6m tons of seized ivory as it tries to elevate wildlife trafficking to an urgent national security concern

The Obama administration said on Monday it would destroy all 6m tons of its stocks of seized ivory – potentially millions in contraband – stepping up efforts to crush an illegal trade that has brought wild elephants to the brink of extinction.

The ivory destruction, announced at a White House event addressed by Hillary and Chelsea Clinton, was part of a broader effort by the administration on Monday to elevate wildlife trafficking from narrow conservation interest to urgent national security concern.

Destroying the ivory would signal that Obama was committed to stopping illegal trafficking in wildlife that has devastated species such as elephants and rhinos, and is a growing security threat, officials told the audience.

"Rising demand for ivory is fuelling a renewed and horrific slaughter of elephants in Africa, threatening remaining populations across the continent," the interior secretary, Sally Jewell, said. "We will continue to work aggressively … to disrupt and prosecute criminals who traffic in ivory, and we encourage other nations to join us in that effort."

The destruction – which officials said would be public – was scheduled to take place on 8 October, officials said.

Jewell also announced a new advisory council, made up of former administration officials, conservation and business leaders, to help guide the crackdown on the criminal poaching syndicates.

Obama has given growing prominence to the dangers posed by wildlife trafficking over the last year amid an explosion of the illegal trade.

Jewell said wildlife trafficking had doubled over the past five years into a global trade worth $10bn. Poaching of elephants had risen by a factor of eight in Tanzania. Killing of rhinos for their horns had gone up by a factor of 50, Jewell said.

State Department officials now openly refer to wildlife trafficking as a national security crisis.

As many as 35,000 African elephants were killed for their tusks last year. That amounted to 96 elephant killed every day, Clinton said.

"At this rate, African forest elephants will be extinct within 10 years," said Clinton.

The profits from the illegal ivory trade were also fuelling extremist groups, including affiliates of al-Qaida in Somalia, she said.

A zero-tolerance strategy was the only way to stop wildlife trafficking, Clinton said.

"You can't be a little bit OK with buying ivory goods, because that opens the floodgates. Therefore we are doing everything we can to stop the trafficking, stop the demand and stop the killing," Clinton said.

Most of the demand for trafficked ivory was from Asia, but there are also American buyers. The owners of two Manhattan jewellery shops were convicted last year of selling ivory trinkets.

Conservation groups said America's decision to destroy its ivory stocks would hurt the contraband market.

A number of other countries – including the Philippines – have also destroyed their stocks of seized ivory.

The Philippines crushed 15m tons of seized ivory beneath industrial rollers earlier this year.

The stockpiles of contraband ivory were seen as a "time bomb" by conservation groups, creating confusion about governments' seriousness to ban the ivory trade, and keeping prices high for trafficked goods.

Officials said the seized US ivory included raw tusks and carved ivory intercepted by the authorities over the past 25 years.

The administration was also thinking of introducing harsher penalties for wildlife trafficking.

"I think the penalties are not significant enough for wildlife trafficking," said David Hayes, a former interior official who was named to the advisory council on Monday.

"We are not creating the kind of disincentive for wildlife trafficking that this problem deserves."
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/sep/09/us-ivory-stocks-illegal-elephant-poaching
 

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As feds crush ivory in Denver to curb poaching, Kerry offers $1M reward to stop elephant killing

U.S. authorities on Thursday crushed 6 tons of seized ivory, each piece cut from dead elephants, signaling resolve to kill a $10 billion illicit trade linked to international crime and terrorism.

Tusks and carved objects seized from airports and border crossings over the past two decades were loaded into a blue rock-grinder near a warehouse at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge where the ivory was kept, and pulverized it all into fine chips.

"By taking this action, the United States will help raise the profile of the issue and inspire other nations," said Judy Garber, deputy assistant secretary of state, one of the senior Obama administration officials in Colorado for the invitation-only event. "All of us have to step up our game and work together to put an end to this before we lose the species forever."

Poached ivory may have financed the recent Somali terrorist attack on Kenya's Westgate mall, Garber said: "That issue is being looked into."

This first U.S. government destruction of illegal ivory was orchestrated as part of a broader campaign including increased funding to fight poaching and crackdowns on consumers. President Obama in July launched a task force. Diplomats have engaged governments in China, Vietnam and Thailand.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Thursday offered a $1 million reward for information leading to the dismantling of the Xaysavang Network, a Laos-based criminal operation that that "facilitates the killing of endangered elephants, rhinos and other species for products such as ivory."

The State Department said the group has affiliates in South Africa, Mozambique, Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam and China. Profits from illegal activities by this group and others, the department said, funds other illicit activities such as narcotics, arms and human trafficking.

Consumer demand for ivory objects is blamed for a surge in killing African elephants. Expanding wealthy classes in East Asia covet ivory items, many of them carved in Chinese government-backed factories.

At least 25,000 elephants were illegally killed in 2012, and even more this year, according to the 178-nation UN-backed Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.

That's the most since CITES banned ivory commerce in 1989. The ban was relaxed in 1997 to let southern African nations with elephants cull herds and sell ivory. CITES allowed ivory sell-offs by governments in 2008 and 2010.

The global population of elephants, estimated at around 600,000 in 1989 is estimated by CITES at 472,000 today.

Assistant U.S. Interior Secretary Dan Ashe compared the intensifying slaughter of elephants today to mass killings of bison in the late 19th century that brought the species to near extinction.

"We have a moral obligation to respond," he told group of U.S. officials and global wildlife conservation leaders gathered at the Arsenal to witness the crush. "You have the chance to crush wildlife trafficking and save these magnificent creatures."

"Sex and the City" star Kristin Davis, a patron of the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, which has worked to raise orphans of slaughtered elephants in Africa, said the orphans themselves now are in jeopardy.

U.S. officials estimate elephants could go extinct in 8-10 years if the current rate of slaughter continues.

The soul of the human species is what is at stake if we allow elephants to go extinct," said "True Blood" actress Kristin Bauer van Straten, an ambassador for the International Fund for Animal Welfare.


Van Straten, 46, threw carvings her late father brought to the U.S. after his military service into the grinder for destruction Thursday. She urged other Americans who have heirloom ivory objects in their possession to destroy them, calling it an ethical choice.

"Are we playing more for the team of consumerism and things? Or are we playing for the team of life?" van Straten said.

U.S. officials are ramping up action because ivory smuggling funds crime and terrorism.

A Sept. 6 report from the Director of National Intelligence says demand for ivory and rhino horn so outpaces supply and is so lucrative that "criminal elements of all kinds, including some terrorist entities and rogue security personnel, often in collusion with government officials in source countries, are involved in poaching and movement of ivory and rhino horn across east, central and southern Africa."


The report echoed congressional testimony by then-Sen. John Kerry last year, before he replaced Hillary Clinton as secretary of state, about armed men crossing from Sudan into Central African Republic and from Somalia into Kenya to kill elephants and smuggle out ivory.

The crush Thursday was was highlighted at U.S. embassies abroad, where diplomats have worked to draw attention to the toughening U.S. approach to illicit wildlife trafficking.

"This material has no economic value because it is seized and forfeited material," said Robert Dreher, acting assistant U.S. Attorney General for the environment, pointing at the pile of ivory before it was loaded into the crusher, promising stronger prosecution of poaching and smuggling inside the U.S.

"The scale of this criminal activity demands a vigorous response," he said. "This is criminal activity that the U.S. will not tolerate."

Wildlife conservation leaders in Denver are calling on Congress to fund the African Elephant Conservation Act with $5 million a year for anti-poaching in Africa and to ban any import, export and interstate movement of ivory. Night vision gear will be an essential tool for African rangers because poachers work at night using sophisticated weapons, said Born Free U.S.A. vice president Adam Roberts.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials have said a monument to slaughtered elephants, using the crushed ivory chips, is envisioned.

Some critics contend symbolic destruction of ivory might boost the value of illegal ivory, which a CITES study said sold for $8,185 per kilo in China. They argue U.S. officials should re-inject the ivory into the market to try to make it less lucrative.

But a widening movement of elephant supporters is pressing for total prohibition.

In June, Kristal Parks, director of Denver-based Pachyderm Power, staged a 10-day hunger strike outside China's embassy in Washington, D.C. She displayed signs - China! Elephants need your help - and sent letters to the ambassador inside.

"No amount of ivory will drive down the price because the lust for ivory is insatiable," said Parks, 63, who works several months a year in Kenya and was there during the mall attack.

"All ivory should be illegal," she said. Elephants are "profoundly noble and majestic in stature with a heightened awareness and sensitivity that dwarfs our own. I couldn't bear to live in a world without them."

http://www.denverpost.com/environment/ci_24518193/u-s-government-crushing-ivory-save-elephants-and
 

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I very much adore & love Elephants :heart: :wub: Such gentle yet powerful animals.... They're apart of the ancients, grand & loyal.



love-romance-elephant-heart.jpg

C7T23402.jpg
 

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<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/6egom_ADs9I" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Author and legendary conservationist Lawrence Anthony died March 2. His family spoke of a solemn procession of Elephants that defies human explanation.

For 12 hours, two herds of wild South African elephants slowly made their way through the Zululand bush until they reached the house of late author Lawrence Anthony, the conservationist who saved their lives.The formerly violent, rogue elephants, destined to be shot a few years ago as pests, were rescued and rehabilitated by Anthony, who had grown up in the bush and was known as the “Elephant Whisperer.”

For two days the herds loitered at Anthony’s rural compound on the vast Thula Thula game reserve in the South African KwaZulu – to say good-bye to the man they loved. But how did they know he had died? Known for his unique ability to calm traumatized elephants, Anthony had become a legend. He is the author of three books, Babylon Ark, detailing his efforts to rescue the animals at Baghdad Zoo during the Iraqi war, the forthcoming The Last Rhinos, and his bestselling The Elephant Whisperer.

There are two elephant herds at Thula Thula. According to his son Dylan, both arrived at the Anthony family compound shortly after Anthony’s death.“They had not visited the house for a year and a half and it must have taken them about 12 hours to make the journey,” Dylan is quoted in various local news accounts. “The first herd arrived on Sunday and the second herd, a day later. They all hung around for about two days before making their way back into the bush.”Elephants have long been known to mourn their dead. In India, baby elephants often are raised with a boy who will be their lifelong “mahout.” The pair develop legendary bonds – and it is not
uncommon for one to waste away without a will to live after the death of the other.

A line of elephants approaching the Anthony house, but these are wild elephants in the 21st century, not some Rudyard Kipling novel.The first herd to arrive at Thula Thula several years ago were violent. They hated humans.
Anthony found himself fighting a desperate battle for their survival and their trust, which he detailed in The Elephant Whisperer:“It was 4:45 a.m. and I was standing in front of Nana, an enraged wild elephant, pleading with her in desperation. Both our lives depended on it. The only thing separating us was an 8,000-volt electric fence that she was preparing to flatten and make her escape.“Nana, the matriarch of her herd, tensed her enormous frame and flared her ears.“’Don’t do it, Nana,’ I said, as calmly as I could. She stood there, motionless but tense. The rest of the herd froze.“’This is your home now,’ I continued. ‘Please don’t do it, girl.’I felt her eyes boring into me.

Anthony, Nana and calf “’They’ll kill you all if you break out. This is your home now. You have no need to run any more.’“Suddenly, the absurdity of the situation struck me,” Anthony writes. “Here I was in pitch darkness, talking to a wild female elephant with a baby, the most dangerous possible combination, as if we were having a friendly chat. But I meant every word. ‘You will all die if you go. Stay here. I will be here with you and it’s a good place.’“She took another step forward. I could see her tense up again, preparing to snap the electric wire and be out, the rest of the herd smashing after her in a flash.“I was in their path, and would only have seconds to scramble out of their way and climb the nearest tree. I wondered if I would be fast enough to avoid being trampled. Possibly not.“Then something happened between Nana and me, some tiny spark of recognition, flaring for the briefest of moments. Then it was gone. Nana turned and melted into the bush. The rest of the herd followed. I couldn’t explain what had happened between us, but it gave me the
first glimmer of hope since the elephants had first thundered into my life.”

Elephants gathering at the Anthony home It had all started several weeks earlier with a phone call from an elephant welfare organization. Would Anthony be interested in adopting a problem herd of wild elephants? They lived on a game reserve 600 miles away and were “troublesome,” recalled Anthony.“They had a tendency to break out of reserves and the owners wanted to get rid of them fast. If we didn’t take them, they would be shot.“The woman explained, ‘The matriarch is an amazing escape artist and has worked out how to break through electric fences. She just twists the wire around her tusks until it snaps, or takes the pain and smashes through.’“’Why me?’ I asked.“’I’ve heard you have a way with animals. You’re right for them. Or maybe they’re right for you.’”What followed was heart-breaking. One of the females and her baby were shot and killed in the round-up, trying to evade capture.

The French version of “The Elephant Whisperer”“When they arrived, they were thumping the inside of the trailer like a gigantic drum. We sedated them with a pole-sized syringe, and once they had calmed down, the door slid open and the matriarch emerged, followed by her baby bull, three females and an 11-year-old bull.”Last off was the 15-year-old son of the dead mother. “He stared at us,” writes Anthony, “flared his ears and with a trumpet of rage, charged, pulling up just short of the fence in front of us.“His mother and baby sister had been shot before his eyes, and here he was, just a teenager, defending his herd. David, my head ranger, named him Mnumzane, which in Zulu means ‘Sir.’ We christened the matriarch Nana, and the second female-in-command, the most feisty, Frankie, after my wife.“We had erected a giant enclosure within the reserve to keep them safe until they became calm enough to move out into the reserve proper.“Nana gathered her clan, loped up to the fence and stretched out her trunk, touching the electric wires. The 8,000-volt charge sent a jolt shuddering through her bulk. She backed off. Then, with her family in tow, she strode the entire perimeter of the enclosure, pointing her trunk at the wire to check for vibrations from the electric current.

“As I went to bed that night, I noticed the elephants lining up along the fence, facing out towards their former home. It looked ominous. I was woken several hours later by one of the reserve’s rangers, shouting, ‘The elephants have gone! They’ve broken out!’ The two adult elephants had worked as a team to fell a tree, smashing it onto the electric fence and then charging out of the enclosure.
“I scrambled together a search party and we raced to the border of the game reserve, but we were too late. The fence was down and the animals had broken out.
“They had somehow found the generator that powered the electric fence around the reserve. After trampling it like a tin can, they had pulled the concrete-embedded fence posts out of the ground like matchsticks, and headed north.”
The reserve staff chased them – but had competition.
“We met a group of locals carrying large caliber rifles, who claimed the elephants were ‘fair game’ now. On our radios we heard the wildlife authorities were issuing elephant rifles to staff. It was now a simple race against time.”
Anthony managed to get the herd back onto Thula Thula property, but problems had just begun:

“Their bid for freedom had, if anything, increased their resentment at being kept in captivity. Nana watched my every move, hostility seeping from every pore, her family behind her. There was no doubt that sooner or later they were going to make another break for freedom.

“Then, in a flash, came the answer. I would live with the herd. To save their lives, I would stay with them, feed them, talk to them. But, most importantly, be with them day and night. We all had to get to know each other.”
It worked, as the book describes in detail, notes the London Daily Mail newspaper.
Anthony was later offered another troubled elephant – one that was all alone because the rest of her herd had been shot or sold, and which feared humans. He had to start the process all over again.
And as his reputation spread, more “troublesome” elephants were brought to Thula Thula.

So, how after Anthony’s death, did the reserve’s elephants — grazing miles away in distant parts of the park — know?
“A good man died suddenly,” says Rabbi Leila Gal Berner, Ph.D., “and from miles and miles away, two herds of elephants, sensing that they had lost a beloved human friend, moved in a solemn, almost ‘funereal’ procession to make a call on the bereaved family at the deceased man’s home.”

“If there ever were a time, when we can truly sense the wondrous ‘interconnectedness of all beings,’ it is when we reflect on the elephants of Thula Thula. A man’s heart’s stops, and hundreds of elephants’ hearts are grieving. This man’s oh-so-abundantly loving heart offered healing to these elephants, and now, they came to pay loving homage to their friend.”

http://delightmakers.com/news/wild-elephants-gather-inexplicably-mourn-death-of-elephant-whisperer/

R.I.P. Lawrence Anthony
 

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An Apology to Elephants 2013
Why we shouldn´t go to circuses and zoo with elephants

[video=youtube;L0Dq6T6fYj8]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0Dq6T6fYj8[/video]

Elephants have been used and mistreated for too long,it´s time to stop.
 
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Such a patience the older elephant show to the babies
 

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Hong Kong Gives Swift Kick to Ivory Traders


Earlier this month, the Chinese government destroyed more than six tons of confiscated ivory held in government stockpiles, signaling the new resolve of the People’s Republic of China to crack down on the illegal ivory trade and to reduce ivory consumption. On January 23, the Hong Kong government’s Endangered Species Advisory Committee (ESAC) of the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) decided that it will destroy 28 tons of ivory stockpiles from past seizures—the largest cache of seized ivory to be destroyed to date, anywhere in the world. This action signals that the fight against the ivory trade is global, and it’s finding increasing favor in critical parts of Asia, among consumers and government officials.

More than 46,000 supporters of our global affiliate, Humane Society International, responded to our call to support the Hong Kong ivory destruction. HSI president and CEO Dr. Andrew Rowan wrote to the ESAC, laying out reasons in support of the destruction. HSI has met and communicated with AFCD and ESAC as well as collaborated closely with advocates of Hong Kong for Elephants. This campaign, coordinated with the work of local advocates during the past year, helped produce the government’s January 23 decision.

Elephant poaching has reached an unprecedented level. Last year, poachers massacred at least 35,000 African elephants. With less than half a million elephants left in the wild in Africa, if this killing rate persists, African elephants could be extinct in two decades. Poachers poisoned or shot elephants with machine guns, and hacked off the tusks of elephants while the animals were still alive. This slaughter of elephants, for jewelry, trinkets, or statuettes—conducted in many cases by the Janjaweed, the Lord’s Resistance Army, and Al-Shabaab, and other terrorist groups—is unconscionable, and it is robbing African nations of the value that live elephants would bring to these nations in the form of wildlife tourism for decades.

Reducing consumer demand for ivory reduces the incentive for poachers to massacre elephants and for traffickers to engage in illegal ivory trade. Destroying stockpiles of seized ivory, as the recent examples of the U.S. and China have demonstrated, is a great way to raise awareness about the elephant poaching crisis and reminds current and potential buyers to eschew ivory. So many people don’t connect their purchase of ivory with the epidemic of poaching, and we are reminding people that you can draw a straight line from the purchase of this product to the killing of elephants in their native habitats.

HSI will continue our public education programs with local partner groups in China and Hong Kong on elephant protection as well as work in concert with relevant government officials and agencies to implement stronger laws to reduce ivory consumption. Here in the U.S., as the second largest market in the world for ivory, there is work to be done. HSUS and HSI are working with lawmakers in Hawaii and New York to ban the sale of ivory to reduce the U.S. prominent role in the cruel ivory trade. We’re likely to expand that effort to other states, toward the goal of creating no safe haven in any part of the world for this blood trade in ivory

http://www.hsi.org/news/news/2014/0...news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=wildlife14
 

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Themba and Albert, an elephant and a sheep

They say they were lucky that the sheep they chosed to be Thembas friend were special.
I believe every sheep can be special, if they only get the chance
 

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Themba and Albert, an elephant and a sheep

They say they were lucky that the sheep they chosed to be Thembas friend were special.
I believe every sheep can be special, if they only get the chance

Ohhhhh.. :heart: Oh my goodness! Thanks for posting. Animals they are so very precious! Tissue...
 
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After 37 Years, Mila the Elephant Meets Another of Her Kind

The dream of a former caretaker at the Franklin Zoo in New Zealand is finally being realized with the sweet introduction of two elephants, Mila and Mary.


Mila, who is now 41, has spent almost her entire life alone. She was born in Namibia in 1973 and, like many others who find themselves in captivity, was taken from her home and her family shortly after.
Mary is the first elephant Mila has seen in 37 years.
The two meet through a barrier at the San Diego Zoo for the first time.
[video=youtube_share;9Nr98Q0P12U]http://youtu.be/9Nr98Q0P12U[/video]


Mila and Mary’s introduction is as heartwarming as they come, and clearly part of an effort to do what’s best for Mila at this point. However, a more important part of her story is how she got here in the first place and why she spent so much time alone.

After being torn from her family, Mila was moved to a zoo in Honolulu where she was reportedly bullied by other elephants. When she was 4-years-old, Mila was bought by trainer Tony Ratcliffe and flown to New Zealand to join the Whirling Brothers Circus. There she was known as Jumbo and was taught tricks, with the use of a bullhook, that she would be forced to perform for crowds for more than 30 years.

During that time, she spent long periods shackled to a short chain in her trailer where she was observed swaying back and forth, which is a stereotypical behavior of an elephant who is suffering from psychological distress that has never been observed in the wild.

Mila‘s former life in the circus as Jumbo.

[video=youtube_share;aNz7Tvf_tO0]http://youtu.be/aNz7Tvf_tO0[/video]


For decades she was kept alone, deprived of space, enrichment and the simple companionship of even a single other elephant while she was exploited in the circus.

In 2009, after extensive lobbying by SAFE, Mila was retired and released from the Loritz Circus, which had bought her from Ratcliffe, and sent to the Franklin Zoo, which took on sole responsibility for her care. There, she was able to play in the mud and learned to make her own decisions, while her confidence and health improved.

Tragedy, however, was soon to follow poor Mila. On April 25, 2012, she was involved in the crushing death of Helen Schofield, a veterinarian and operator of the zoo, who had bonded with her and wanted to help her move to a sanctuary in the U.S. where she could live out her days with other elephants.

No one’s sure what happened in Mila’s head the day she grabbed Schofield with her trunk. Some reportedly believe she finally snapped after spending all those years alone in the circus, while a few witnesses speculate she was frightened and acting protectively after being shocked by an electric fence.

While there was some debate about what to do with Mila following the incident, plans to have her moved to the U.S. progressed. In honor of Schofield’s dream of seeing Mila reunited with other elephants, the zoo’s staff and supporters raised $1.5 million to have her transported from New Zealand to the San Diego Zoo in November. She spent the holiday season in quarantine before being introduced to Mary, the herd’s matriarch, this month.

Although some of her advocates are disappointed she ended up at a zoo and not a sanctuary, they are pleased that her days as a performer are over and that she is at least being cared for in the company of her own kind.

While Mila and Mary’s bond grows and she’s introduced to other elephants in California, similar efforts are currently underway to help other elephants who have been left alone, including Tania, who is being kept in solitary at a zoo in Romania, and Lucky, who is being kept alone at the San Antonio Zoo by officials who arrogantly refuse to even acknowledge that might not be best for her.

Hopefully, Mila’s story will serve as a reminder about avoiding establishments that keep these giants in captivity, especially as performers, in addition to raising awareness about the decisions we’re making for those we insist on keeping captive: who comes, who goes, who’s bred, who lives and who dies



Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/after-3...-meets-another-of-her-kind.html#ixzz2uVgavCZA
 

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On International Women's Day is a good time to post this about a very special woman,

Pat Derby was the first to champion the cause of performing wild animals,
and she put her heart and soul into their rescue, care and protection.

She was full of dreams, but unlike many people, she realized hers with a vengeance!
Pat's cherished dream of creating a spacious refuge where performing animals could express their wild
natures in an enriching, natural habitat became what is now ARK 2000 in San Andreas, Calif. - a thriving
2,300-acre sanctuary where we currently care for 11 elephants, 21 tigers, 4 lions, 7 bears and one black leopard.

No one but Pat could conceive of and realize an event as spectacular as "Circus PAWS," which debuted in Hollywood, Calif., in 2012.
The circus used only human performers to entertain and to teach young and old alike that wild animals just don't belong in circuses.
Pat fearlessly advocated for captive wildlife and performing animals.
Together, she and Ed set the pace for the legislative work that we continue today.

Always at the forefront, they inspired and passed milestone legislation in California, and stormed the halls in Washington, D.C., bringing the suffering of elephants in circuses and traveling shows to light with moving testimony before members of Congress.

You can read more here http://www.pawsweb.org/
 

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Surprise! Elephants Have Been Listening to and Judging Us By Our Voices



We already know African elephants are extremely intelligent, but new research has demonstrated they’re even more sophisticated than we thought and have learned to differentiate between different languages, ages and genders among humans and determine who poses a threat to them.

Researchers Karen McComb and Graeme Shannon from the University of Sussex recorded the voices of two different ethnic groups of people: the Maasai, who are herders who frequently have conflicts with elephants, and the Kamba, who rarely encounter them, saying “Look, look over there, a group of elephants is coming.”

They then played the recordings to elephants at the Amboseli National Park in Kenya. While the researchers don’t believe elephants understood the specific words being spoken, they found elephants could easily distinguish between the two groups and between people within those groups.

The results, which were published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, showed that elephants mostly ignored women and children from the Maasai, who were unlikely to cause them harm, along with Kamba men. However, when they heard the sound of Maasai men, they got defensive, huddled and sniffed the air to try and detect threats.

Even when the recordings were changed to give men and women the same pitch, elephants could still tell them apart.

According to a statement from the university, the ability to discriminate from real and perceived threats, particularly when it comes to humans, can impact their future survival by helping them avoid interruptions and unnecessary stress. Because we don’t all pose a threat to elephants, their ability to recognize voices gives them an advantage, especially if they can’t immediately see who is there.

A separate study of elephants in Kenya, which was conducted by researchers from the University of Oxford, Save the Elephants, and Disney’s Animal Kingdom, found that elephants in turn have a specific alarm call for humans.

In this case, when resting elephants were played recordings of the voices of local tribesmen, they reacted by making a low rumbling alarm call and running away. When other elephants were played recordings of the alarm calls, they reacted similarly.

Lucy King, a wildlife biologist with the University of Oxford, explained that the differences in alarm calls are the “equivalent to a change in vowel sounds in English words, such as the distinction between sounds of “boo” versus “bee.”

This study built on previous work that showed elephants have a specific alarm call for bees. Even though the alarm calls might sound the same to us, they’re making sounds at frequencies we can’t hear that change depending on how serious the threat is. Their reaction to humans resulted in different actions. The alarm call for humans didn’t result in them shaking their heads, like they would if they heard the alarm for bees.

Not only do these studies show that elephants continue to surpass our limited understanding of how sensitive, social and intelligent they are, but they could lead to a stronger understanding of how to reduce our conflicts with them and further conservation efforts. In some places, farmers have already taken advantage of elephants’ natural fear of bees by placing hives near their fences.
[video=youtube_share;rn3vUHFGv4U]http://youtu.be/rn3vUHFGv4U[/video]



Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/surpris...d-judging-us-by-our-voices.html#ixzz2vyFLaZed
 

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Elephant Escapes Poachers Twice, Seeks Out Treatment


In the sprawling expanse of Kenya&#8217;s Tsavo East National Park, an elephant named Mshale has been fighting for his life. After taking a total of four arrows in two known poaching attempts, this animal has beaten the odds again and again. Why are poachers so determined to destroy this creature? His ivory tusks, which clock in at more than 100 pounds and are worth around $35,000 on the black market. This market wants to pack his ivory into containers, ship it halfway across the globe and carve it into little trinkets for people to wear as status symbols.

Mshale, now around 40 years old, has been roaming around the northern area of Tsavo East for some time. At the Ithumba Orphans Facility, where he visited often for clean drinking water and the company of other elephants, this large bull was well known to workers. That sense of familiarity might have saved his life in July of 2012 when poachers targeted Mshale and lodged a poison arrow into him. However, before it could take effect, the elephant lumbered to the Ithumba stockades where vets from David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust (DSWT) and Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) administered treatment. The arrow was laced with Akokanthera toxin, derived from the unripe fruit of a tree native to the region.

After a short recovery, Mshale made his way back into Tsavo&#8217;s wilderness. The DSWT and KWS teamed up with their anti-poaching squads and tried to keep ahead of Mshale&#8217;s movements. It wasn&#8217;t until March of this year, while doing a flyby of more than 500 elephants, that they saw Mshale again. This time he was badly limping with a wound in his back visible from the air. They set down the craft to find two other large bull elephants guarding him.

Rob Brandford relayed the scene. &#8220;He had two large and deep spear wounds which had to be cleaned. One had passed right through his ear deep into his neck; the other into his back.&#8221;

The poison spears had taken their toll. When the vet team was finally able to get Mshale sedated for treatment, they realized the wound on his rump had caused a festering abscess the size of a basketball. Pounds of dead tissue had to be cut away before the wound could be cleaned, and many working on the bull wondered if he&#8217;d ever be able to walk again.

When Mshale began to stir, they quickly treated the animal with strong antibiotic injections and packed the wound with clay, to seal it from further infection. Within minutes, to the surprise of everybody on staff, Mshale was soon back on his feet. It was said he stared at those who had treated him for a moment, before turning around and hobbling back into the African bush.

In the end, the DSWT and KWS vets have pulled four spears from Mshale in a period of less than two years. His tusks are prized objects, and demand for ivory in China and Southeast Asia has made such poaching endeavors, sadly, commonplace. Poachers, who generally work in groups of about four, use silent methods in Tsavo, such as poison arrows and traps. In other parts of Africa, guns, helicopters, and even GPS tracking methods have been used to decimate entire herds.

Kenya&#8217;s ports (many of which have been financed by Chinese investment) and busy, chaotic, international airport, have made Kenya an ideal location for the shipment of black market goods. And although last year KWS successfully seized more than 8 tons of ivory, by the time they reach it, it&#8217;s still too late for the elephant.

&#8220;We must recognize the importance of education and awareness campaigns, people need to know the truth about ivory to be encouraged not to buy it and instead to see the true beauty of ivory which is only seen on live elephants,&#8221; said Rob Brandford. Anti-poaching measures, as well as search and seizure of exports, further training and pay raises for KWS staff must be improved around Kenya to help slow the trade of ivory. However, the sad reality remains, that until consumers stop purchasing it, the poachers will continue to stalk Mshale, and elephants just like him, around Africa&#8217;s many national parks.



Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/elephant-escapes-poachers-twice-seeks-out-treatment.html#ixzz2wReTOxMR
 
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