What about elephants

MIST

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elephantnews
Publicerades den 30 dec. 2018

This new project in Phuket now provides a caring home in nature for three elephants rescued from elephant riding. The owner of the project, Kong, comes from a family who has lived and worked with elephants for generations. After spending time at Elephant Nature Park, Kong was inspired to make the transition to a responsible, ethical form of elephant tourism for the benefit of the elephants in his care. It took almost a year to build the elephant home of his dreams. Today these rescued elephants are celebrating their newfound liberty with wonder and joy – trumpeting and exploring their new jungle habitat for the first time in their lives.

[video=youtube;fGnZdKuJ61s]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGnZdKuJ61s[/video]
 

Nantucket Cat

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I love elephants so much. I read a thing a while back about how researchers have found that elephants might actually have religious beliefs of sorts. It's kind of well-known that they have particular way of dealing with their dead, but apparently people have found that they also have rituals that seem to correspond to phases of the moon. I'll see if I can find a link about this; I thought it was super fascinating when I read about it!
 

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FAREWELL TO OUR BELOVED LUNA

There was an unusual storm at night on the 30th of March. Strong, dust-laden winds knocked on every door and window.
It seemed as if the sky was angry, for the lightning was ferocious enough to make every living person stop in their tracks and wonder, “Is everything okay?” Perhaps the winds were merely the harbinger of the news that Luna’s last breaths were close at hand.

From the little time that Luna spent with us, we knew that life had been immensely painful for her.
While we can never fathom the mental trauma that she endured as a calf when she was ripped from her mother, we knew that her adulthood, too, was marked with trauma at every step and turn.
When our team first met her, they were moved by the dull aura that Luna had about her. She was always fixated in one place, not even making a single sound.
Luna’s stature seemed to be bending inward as if indicating that the mere weight of existence was too much for her to bear.
With every part of her body riddled with ailments, it appeared as if she was fighting a tough battle all alone.

This battered pachyderm needed our help, and we mobilised quickly to get help to her.
After nearly five decades of torture and negligence, Luna’s delicate feet were failing her and getting the best of her.
Her pain was a shadow that followed her everywhere.
Many times, Luna would lay down to rest only to not be able to get up for many hours as her severely arthritic limbs would ache just too much.
Right before she was being loaded onto the Wildlife SOS Elephant Ambulance, her feet gave away and a crane had to be mobilised to help her back on her feet.
Yet Luna stepped onto the ambulance in anticipation of a kinder, healing future and moved us all with her strong determination and courage.
Luna arrived at the Wildlife SOS Elephant Hospital on the 31st of January, during the wee hours of the morning and new dawn broke in her life.

Luna was quick to accept her new home.
Perhaps her strong sense of hearing quickly told her that there was a companion awaiting her next door.
The two elephants clicked instantly and naturally like it was always meant to be.
Perhaps the two friends understood the scars from each other’s past in a way that no human could.
During lazy afternoons, Luna and Holly would simply stand next to each other under a tree.
Holly would delicately run her trunk over Luna, as their stomachs rumbled softly.
Holly’s enthusiasm would even coax Luna to explore her surroundings, and the two friends would eat fruits and vegetables standing right next to each other. Reassurances from Holly strengthened Luna’s spirit and helped her become just an elephant.

Her keeper, too, would go an extra mile to make sure that Luna got all the comfort possible.
Under his dedicated care, Luna started to let go of her apprehensions.
We soon found out that Luna was a complete water baby; she thoroughly enjoyed being hosed down with fresh, cool water.
[video=youtube;iD-7_a-zQpY]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iD-7_a-zQpY[/video]
As her keeper scrubbed her body to remove dirt from her wounds, Luna would take the hosepipe in her trunk to collect water in her trunk and splash it all over herself and her keeper.
Luna would then always finish off her showers with an earthy ritual of sprinkling a trunkful of dust all over herself.
In fact, Luna thoroughly enjoyed the dust that surrounded her at her new home, and could always be spotted giving herself seemingly cathartic dust baths.

At the back of our mind, our concern for Luna never subsided, and we were always acutely aware of the pain that she was in.
Our efforts to treat her chronic ulceration, severe arthritis and oedema continued, with our dedicated team working round the clock.
Luna had several bad days due to her weak feet, which would render her unable to get up after lying down.
Her strong and determined spirit would make her want to use all of her strength to get up at once, but this would also exhaust her quickly. In these moments, Luna’s keeper would never leave her side and was always there with comforting and reassuring words that it would all be fine.
He made sure that Luna got ample time to rest and relax her mind before any attempts were made to lift her with a crane.
These instances assured Luna that it was okay to take a moment and rest, and not stress out.
Slowly, this helped build Luna’s confidence and she gradually started to get up on her own.
This gave us a sense of hope and made us proud of the fighter that Luna was.
[video=youtube;0RYFx96p0j4]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RYFx96p0j4[/video]

But maybe, some days are simply too bad.
During the early morning hours on the 21st of March, Luna’s keeper found that she was having trouble getting up.
He quickly alerted the team, who soon mobilised the crane to give her external help.
But the pain in her arthritic hind legs was much too great and she was unable to bear weight.
It was important to let her rest, and with the help of a crane, our team laid her in a comfortable position on the mud bed.
The veterinary team administered her with pain killers in the hope that it would help Luna become comfortable. Her keeper was by her side feeding Luna her favourite cucumbers and softly calling out to her.
When the next attempt to help her stand failed, our team realised that perhaps Luna was now living her final days. Holly, too, sensed something was amiss as she walked past Luna’s enclosure, and let out a soft wail.
She proceeded to stand under their tree like she had every day in anticipation of her friend’s arrival.

Our team stood by Luna throughout and worked day and night to make her last days as easy as possible.
Luna’s keeper hand-fed her favourite treats- cucumbers, papaya and watermelons every day, and electrolytes were administered to keep her hydrated.
Big rubber tubes were adjusted under her so that her chronic ulcers did not add to her pain and to prevent her from developing any new injuries.
Luna’s appetite slowly decreased as her breaths became louder and slower.
Luna died in her sleep in the morning of 31st of March. Her burial was simple, yet profound.
The team who had cared for her during her short stay at the Field of Dreams laid flowers and garlands at the site and observed a two-minute silence.

http://wildlifesos.org/farewell-to-our-beloved-luna/

Elephants like Luna are forced to walk on hard asphalt when they are used in in processions, for begging and the asphalt can be hot, destroying their feet. Year after year, decades after decades.
 

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Elephant poaching falls dramatically in Africa
By Erik StokstadMay. 28, 2019 , 11:00 AM

Elephant poaching in Africa has dropped significantly from a peak in 2011, according to a new analysis of annual surveillance data. The progress seems to have resulted in large part from declining demand for ivory in China, which has banned the trade, and government action in some African countries. But even with the “vast improvements,” the problem isn’t solved yet, says ecologist George Wittemyer of Colorado State University in Fort Collins, who was not involved in the study. “The pressure is still high, and the species is under threat.”

The illegal killing of elephants in sub-Saharan Africa began to rise in 2005. Many scientists suspected the rise was due to growing demand for ivory in China, where carved ivory has long been treasured and a growing middle class was flush with cash. It developed into a “huge poaching problem,” says Colin Beale, an ecologist at the University of York in the United Kingdom. By 2014, the continental population of savanna elephants had dropped by almost a third to an estimated 352,000. To figure out which elephants were killed by poachers—and which died of natural causes—rangers working with the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora examined carcasses found at 53 sites in parks across the continent. Their annual reports cover about half the African elephant population.

Beale and colleagues took these raw data from 2002 to 2017 and, after adjusting for various biases, found that illegal killing peaked in 2011, when 10% of all elephants fell victim to poaching. That number has now fallen to about 4%, they report today in Nature Communications. Wittemyer calls the study “a pretty sophisticated analysis

To figure out the reason for the decline, Beale and his colleagues turned to the ivory trade, looking at its price as a proxy for demand. Because selling elephant ivory is illegal, price data aren’t publicly available; instead, the researchers analyzed the cost of ivory from an extinct relative, the mammoth, which is legal to trade. The poaching rate closely followed the ups and downs in those prices, they found. In the major Chinese markets, mammoth ivory—which sells for far less than elephant ivory—ranged from $22 per kilogram wholesale in 2002 to more than $90 in 2011.

Many conservation groups credit the Chinese government’s 2017 ban on the ivory trade—and its 2016 announcement—for the decline in elephant poaching. Celebrity ads in which actor Jackie Chan and basketball star Yao Ming condemned the ivory business may have helped as well. But Beale isn’t convinced that cultural tastes have completely changed; he thinks the fall-off may be because of a slowdown in economic growth. If China’s economy catches fire again, demand for ivory might also increase, he worries. “It’s too early to be complacent,” he says.

In addition to ivory prices, the researchers found three other factors that seemed to affect poaching rates. From most to least influential, they are: the amount of corruption in a country, the poverty rate in villages near elephant populations, and the adequacy of law enforcement, as reported by rangers in the wildlife parks. To Beale, those factors suggest fighting poverty may be a better way to protect elephants than shoring up law enforcement.

But he cautions against any cuts to such enforcement. As Wittemyer notes, much of the progress in reducing poaching, especially in East Africa, was thanks to Tanzania and other East African countries improving protection. “That’s been the biggest shift we’ve seen on the continent,” Wittemyer says. “It’s a big improvement.”

It’s not clear whether elephant populations can survive in the long run with the current, lower level of poaching. Beale and his Ph.D. student Severin Hauenstein are planning to study that question. Wittemyer suspects a significant threat persists. “We’re not out of the risk zone yet.”

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/05/elephant-poaching-falls-dramatically-africa
 

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This is the rescue journey of Somboon, who is 18 months pregnant, and the old lady, Sri Nuan. They began this walk at four pm, since both of them had not been on a truck for more than twenty years.
Somboon would not have welcomed the stress of loading and transport. And the old girl had a blockage for many days, so walking combined with fluid therapy was the best decision for her.
When the journey started, the mahout put a drag chain on their leg for safety, as there was so much unfamiliar to them, walking along different paths and roadways toward their new home. After walking for awhile, the elephants became more calm and I asked the mahout to take the chain off.
All along this journey, we were pleasantly surprised to see the local people interested in our venture. Many side road shops brought food and drinks, donating to our team, as well as fruit for the elephants.It was a long journey but we were happy to bring two more lovely Giants to freedom. Somboon's baby can be born free in the sanctuary. Sri Nuan is now retired from her hard labor.
Thanks to every one who walked with us, from early evening until the dawn of a new day. Special thanks to Susan Field who helped us prepare and who journeyed the whole way with us, and also accommodated our team in her beautiful home.
A new life begins for these two girls at Samui Elephant Haven. It should be the better life of all working elephants. And one day this will be so, as law, education and ethics join hands.
 

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Old lady Yai Bua has a difficult time moving her legs the way that she might want them to move. The years have had their toll on her, and she is sore and tired and sometimes unsteady. She has fallen down more than a few times but she never fails to stand up again. She never gives up, and she is proud to be herself.
She loves to swim but the river now is a bit of a walk for her with uneven ground and loose sand and stone on the way into the water. When our old lady does not give up, we also will not let her down. We worked quickly to build a swimming pool for her next to her enclosure so that she can enjoy a relaxing time whenever she wants it.
The pool was a month in construction. Yai Bua is quite happy about it, and can be frequently seen dawdling off to her pool when she is tired of standing. The buoyancy of her body in the water gives her confidence to stand again, whereas on dry land, she will not lie down even if she has good piles of sand as a bed. We will always try to help our older ladies at Elephant Nature Park.
This great grand nanny shows to us her strong inner character and determination. She inspires me to a similar strength and courage. When Yai Bua will not give up, what excuse could we possibly offer ?
 

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She didn´t forget the humans who saved her and took care of her for years.She´s free to go where she want but she wanted to show her baby to her human family.Wonderful
[video=youtube;CLvHLnmo9uo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLvHLnmo9uo[/video]
 

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Breaking News! We're thrilled to tell you we just rescued Delhi's last begging elephant with the help of the Forest Department and Police. We've had a nationwide search to find this elephant underway for months. The entire rescue operation took over 14 hours and ran throughout the night. After dealing with several roadblocks and angry mobs, the elephant is now safe.

In honor of her new life ahead, we're calling her "Jasmine."
At this very moment, Jasmine is safely in a truck being escorted by a team of Wildlife SOS vets and elephant care specialists to her new forest home.
She will retire and live at the Wildlife SOS Elephant Rehabilitation Center in Haryana where she can heal with dignity and freedom.
But Jasmine still needs your help. She desperately needs medical attention after almost 40 years of abuse and malnourishment.
More than anything, we wish we could take away the years of pain Jasmine has endured, but we can't change the past. What we can change – with your help – is her future. We can tend to her wounds, ease her pain, and give her a life filled with love and companionship ... something she has never before experienced.

"The Elephant Rehabilitation Center is a large forested facility where Jasmine will find a peaceful retirement from a lifelong of suffering."
- Kartick Satyanarayan, Co-founder and CEO

[video=youtube;hrYH80Hw2uI]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrYH80Hw2uI[/video]
 

wednesday

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Baby elephants are the cutest.

keira_africa5.jpg

 

MIST

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Wildlife S.O.S
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Looking for a New Year's resolution? How about 'refusing to ride' an elephant for entertainment?

With the arrival of 2020, we have launched the 2nd phase of our #RefuseToRide campaign in a bid to educate tourists travelling to Jaipur about the terrible consequences of riding #elephants.
In this phase, the popular tourist train ‘Gatimaan Express’ will exhibit our message to all tourists through numerous flyers and headrest coverings.
The Gatimaan Express was chosen for its popularity with tourists - it records nearly 70% footfall amongst foreign travellers - and for the fact that it runs through the very important 'Golden Triangle' route, covering Delhi, Agra and Jaipur.

We hope that this year will bring us success and help us save these abused elephants.
 
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