Drake featuring Michael Jackson (TONIGHT)

FD1998

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Check out Drake's Instagram and look at the picture where he says he has more coming. He has tagged a music video director in the post. Music video for DMTM possibly?
 

MJ5

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Check out Drake's Instagram and look at the picture where he says he has more coming. He has tagged a music video director in the post. Music video for DMTM possibly?

I am not on instagram, can you provide more details here?
 

Korgnex

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I'm honestly glad this song went NOWHERE. This is possibly by far the most boring, crude "got some famous person on my track"-song I have heard. This song won't be remembered, it has been talked about because someone put random and akwardly processed MJ vox in it.

The song hasn't shown any craftsmanship, just another use-and-throw-thing à la the quickly and cheaply done Xscape crap... contemporized mixes and the T25 remixes.
 

mj_brainiac

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Doggone;4233551 said:
I didn’t say it never charted on the Hot 100, you genius. It never charted *AGAIN* when the song was officially released as a single.
Was what I said enough for the rudeness?

travis3000 asked if it ever made the Hot 100, you said "not at all", so I pointed out that it has before.
 

Mikky Dee

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Was what I said enough for the rudeness?

travis3000 asked if it ever made the Hot 100, you said "not at all", so I pointed out that it has before.

Thank you for your contributions, mj_brainiac. There is never an excuse for rudeness.
We're all here for the same reason and need to speak to each other with respect.
 

dam2040

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Korgnex;4233700 said:
I'm honestly glad this song went NOWHERE. This is possibly by far the most boring, crude "got some famous person on my track"-song I have heard. This song won't be remembered, it has been talked about because someone put random and akwardly processed MJ vox in it.

The song hasn't shown any craftsmanship, just another use-and-throw-thing à la the quickly and cheaply done Xscape crap... contemporized mixes and the T25 remixes.

I was so excited when I saw the track list. I’d hoped for a real powerful MJ vocal and a genuine hit that would really show MJ off in a great light.

Instead we got a poorly filtered auto tuned acapella and there was even a viral tweet on release saying “MJ coulda came harder”.

The whole thing is a mess and I’d love to know why the Estate felt they could do this without telling us why. Their supposed statement never came and I can’t think why.
 

Smooth72

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dam2040;4233762 said:
I was so excited when I saw the track list. I’d hoped for a real powerful MJ vocal and a genuine hit that would really show MJ off in a great light.

Instead we got a poorly filtered auto tuned acapella and there was even a viral tweet on release saying “MJ coulda came harder”.

The whole thing is a mess and I’d love to know why the Estate felt they could do this without telling us why. Their supposed statement never came and I can’t think why.

The estate doesn’t need to tell anybody why. Why are we entitled? I get what your saying but they don’t owe us any reason. What do you want them to say? Drake gave us a million bucks to use the vocals on the track? It don’t matter to me.
 

8701girl

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I'm honestly glad this song went NOWHERE. This is possibly by far the most boring, crude "got some famous person on my track"-song I have heard. This song won't be remembered, it has been talked about because someone put random and akwardly processed MJ vox in it.

Totally agree with you
 

FD1998

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Korgnex;4233700 said:
I'm honestly glad this song went NOWHERE. This is possibly by far the most boring, crude "got some famous person on my track"-song I have heard. This song won't be remembered, it has been talked about because someone put random and akwardly processed MJ vox in it.

The song hasn't shown any craftsmanship, just another use-and-throw-thing à la the quickly and cheaply done Xscape crap... contemporized mixes and the T25 remixes.

You may have been living under a rock. The song was number one worldwide on both Apple Music and Spotify for seven days. It's contemporary and this new style of music is to be welcomed. It's progress from the god-awful 2009-2014 era of music.
 

Nite Line

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dam2040;4233762 said:
I was so excited when I saw the track list. I’d hoped for a real powerful MJ vocal and a genuine hit that would really show MJ off in a great light.

Instead we got a poorly filtered auto tuned acapella and there was even a viral tweet on release saying “MJ coulda came harder”.

The whole thing is a mess and I’d love to know why the Estate felt they could do this without telling us why. Their supposed statement never came and I can’t think why.

Tbh, this song was a top 10 hit in many markets including UK and US. So it's not like it flopped. But I do believe that was more to do with the hype of Drake's new album and Michael's new song, rather than the quality of the track. It has been a single in US for a month now, yet it doesn't seem like it will return to the hot 100 and honestly I'm not surprised. The song is very boring and I've hardly listened to it after the first day of its release. Drake has to be the most boring vocalist alive. How he has any fans is beyond me? Despite the butchering of Michael's vocals, he is still easily the highlight of the song, which just shows how far ahead he is of contemporary artists.

I just hope that next new Michael song that we get, at least his vocals aren't so heavily altered with to a point that he sounds more like The Weekend than Michael Jackson.
 

DuranDuran

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Drake has to be the most boring vocalist alive. How he has any fans is beyond me?
Drake is a rapper though, not really a singer. Maybe he sometimes does a sing-song type of rap cadence like Bone Thugs N Harmony, Nate Dogg, Shaggy, & Nelly. There are some rappers that do straight singing like Lauryn Hill, Wyclef, Queen Latifah, & Kid from Kid N Play.

In the USA, hip hop has been one of the most popular genres in the mainstream since at least the 1990s, and starting with Run DMC in the mid 1980s. What they call "mumble rap" and trap beats has been the big thing for the past few years.
 

Korgnex

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You may have been living under a rock. The song was number one worldwide on both Apple Music and Spotify for seven days. It's contemporary and this new style of music is to be welcomed. It's progress from the god-awful 2009-2014 era of music.

No, I haven't. Nowadays first week on digital channels by an US artist that is just hyped doesn't mean anything. ANY of that guy's songs were at those numbers. People do not really buy albums, they stream songs and that song was being talked about, it's as simply as that.

The "video" is a joke, really.
 

SmoothGangsta

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No, I haven't. Nowadays first week on digital channels by an US artist that is just hyped doesn't mean anything. ANY of that guy's songs were at those numbers. People do not really buy albums, they stream songs and that song was being talked about, it's as simply as that.

The "video" is a joke, really.

There's been no video made for the song.
 

Nite Line

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Hope we don't get any video for this song. The posthumous MJ videos have been nothing but tragic. I don't want another video featuring archive footage from his previous videos and concerts, and some cheap dancers impersonating him. Don't want none of that **** again.
 

KOPV

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It's a drake song featuring michael. A video it would not be about michael.. in fact they dont even need to show anything relating to Michael and still be topical
 

DuranDuran

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videos

It's a drake song featuring michael. A video it would not be about michael.. in fact they dont even need to show anything relating to Michael and still be topical
Mike wasn't in Rockwell's video for Somebody's Watching Me, the MC Lyte one for Keep On Keepin' On, or OPP by Naughty By Nature. However a song that does not have Mike's voice in it has a reference to him in the music video (Childish Gambino - Feels Like Summer)
 

dam2040

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Re: videos

Mike wasn't in Rockwell's video for Somebody's Watching Me, the MC Lyte one for Keep On Keepin' On, or OPP by Naughty By Nature. However a song that does not have Mike's voice in it has a reference to him in the music video (Childish Gambino - Feels Like Summer)

He was in certain versions of the 'Right Here' video, though.
 

MJTruth

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8701 girl.

If I remember correctly "Right here" featured clips of MJ singing human Nature (the bits sampled in the song) from the Dangerous World Tour.


Hope we don't get any video for this song. The posthumous MJ videos have been nothing but tragic. I don't want another video featuring archive footage from his previous videos and concerts, and some cheap dancers impersonating him. Don't want none of that **** again.


I don't agree.

Behind The Mask was a great video, and I wasn't offended by Hollywood Tonight or LNFSG either.
 
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dam2040

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8701 girl.

If I remember correctly "Right here" featured clips of MJ singing human Nature (the bits sampled in the song) from the Dangerous World Tour.





I don't agree.

Behind The Mask was a great video, and I wasn't offended by Hollywood Tonight or LNFSG either.

The Hollywood video was awful. Hollywood Tonight wasn't a positive song. Having a woman dance over MJs Hollywood star with his videos on billboards was a terrible idea for the song.
 

Nite Line

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I don't agree.

Behind The Mask was a great video, and I wasn't offended by Hollywood Tonight or LNFSG either.

It's not that they are terrible videos. It's the fact that they have no replay value. I don't think I've watched the Hold my Hand, Hollywood Tonight, LNFSG videos more than a couple of times. And it's because I have very little interest in seeing a music video made up of already released Michael Jackson video footage and some dancers imitating his dance moves.

What I'm interested in seeing is unreleased Michael Jackson video footage, which there is a lot of. The only posthumous video that I still watch occasionally is the video for A Place With No Name, and that's because it features previously unreleased Michael Jackson footage.
 

8701girl

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Yes that is true hold my hand etc are old videos now and we need more unreleased stuff but i find it werid how they recently released ''behind the mask'' vid. Like that song is from 2010 but yet they do a video for it now i just dont get it
 

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When the Estate actually put any creativity behind their videos then I'll be interested in watching them. A video for APWNN had so much potential and the video we got was a colossal disappointment.
 

8701girl

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I just read on twitter they are doing the musical ''sisterella'' again! aussie fans will probably remember this musical
 

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by Tim Ingham November 9, 2018 Rolling Stone
drake-the-album-is-in-deep-trouble-2.jpg

Drake performs on stage at Tacoma Dome on November 1, 2018 in Tacoma, Washington.

Make no mistake, the album is fighting for its life.

Sales of music’s most beloved format are in free fall in the United States this year. According to figures published by the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America), the value of total stateside album sales in the first half of 2018 (across download, CD and vinyl) plummeted by 25.8 percent when compared with the first half of 2017.

If that percentage decline holds for the full year, and there’s every indication it will, annual U.S. album sales in 2018 will end up at half the size of what they were as recently as 2015. To put it more plainly, U.S. consumers will spend around half a billion dollars less on albums this year than they did in 2017.

The CD album is, predictably, bearing the brunt of this damage. After a comfortable 6.5 percent drop in sales in 2017, in the first half of 2018, revenues generated by the CD album in the USA were slashed nearly in half – down 41.5 percent, to $246 million.
The-Album-Is-in-Deep-Trouble-and-the-Music-Business-Probably-Can%E2%80%99t-Save-it-CHART-EDIT.jpg



It’s not hard to see why. 2018 will go down as a landmark year for the acceleration of the decline in physical album sales: The likes of Drake, Eminem, Cardi B, Travis Scott, Migos and Kanye West have all released hotly anticipated new LPs exclusively on digital services in their first week. All brought physical formats into play only after their records’ initial “sales” rush was over.

Hip-hop’s biggest names, it seems, are actively turning their back on the CD (and on brick-and-mortar retailers) — instead focusing on the likes of Spotify and Apple Music, where their genre is currently the king of kings.

None of this, of course, is a big shock.

Back in 2014, you may remember, Spotify co-founder Daniel Ek had an awkward public sparring match with Taylor Swift, following the superstar’s decision to pull her back catalog from his service. Facing down accusations that Spotify was “cannibalizing” the album, Ek wrote, “In the old days, multiple artists sold multiple millions [of albums] every year. That just doesn’t happen anymore; people’s listening habits have changed — and they’re not going to change back.”

He wasn’t wrong. As we all know, the music business held hands with Ek and dived profit-first into a streaming-led industry.

Now, however, a murmur is quietly breaking out: In the rush to follow the money, did the music business sacrifice something more valuable than it could have realized?

Sure, hits on streaming services make a lot of people a lot of money. But as the death knell rings for the album — and the music industry returns to the pre-Beatles era of track-led consumption — are fans being encouraged to develop a less-committed relationship with new artists?

The answer to that question ultimately depends on how those fans are consuming music on Spotify, Apple Music, et. al. One thing’s for sure: Not all new music is created equal — and the stats bear it out.

Take Drake’s Scorpion, the biggest album in the U.S. market this year. In a clear bid to rack up as many streams possible (and break multiple records in the process), Scorpion is 25 tracks long. Yet, according to numbers I’ve obtained and crunched from Spotify-monitoring site Kworb, some 63 percent of global streams from Scorpion on Spotify since the album’s release in June have come from just three songs: “God’s Plan,” “In My Feelings” and “Nice for What.”

In fact, just six songs on the album (also including “Nonstop,” “Don’t Matter to Me” and “I’m Upset”) have claimed 82 percent of its total streams. The other 19 tracks get just 18 percent of the spoils between them — an average of less than 1 percent each.

It’s a similar story with the biggest album of the first half of the year in the U.S.: Post Malone’s beerbongs & bentleys, from which just three tracks (“Rockstar,” “Psycho” and “Better Now”) account for 62 percent of worldwide Spotify streams.

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You could argue that things have always been this way — that fans in previous eras would buy albums and then simply rinse and repeat their favorite individual tracks, ignoring what they deemed to be duds.

Additionally, you could argue that streaming has been wonderful news for the album — any fan anywhere in the world can now legally consume albums for “free” via Spotify, rather than shelling out a potentially prohibitive expense on CDs or downloads. If the experience of listening to full albums was compelling enough in 2018, therefore, the format should be thriving.

Yet industry machinery has certainly propagated this dismantling of the LP. The Billboard 200, still the most recognized album chart in the world, has, since December 2014, bundled together streams of individual tracks from an LP as “streaming-equivalent albums.” Billboard’s current, much-debated formula: 1,250 paid-for streams from the likes of Apple Music or Spotify Premium count as one album “sale”, as do 3,750 streams from ad-funded services like YouTube or Spotify’s free tier.

This has led to some pretty odd situations: Drake’s Scorpion, for instance, sold 160,000 true album units (via download sites) in its opening week, but, according to Billboard/Nielsen, more than three times this amount (551,000) came via “streaming-equivalent albums.”

In Scorpion’s second week on the Billboard 200, the potential silliness of “streaming-equivalent albums” came home to roost: The album sold (as in actually sold) just 29,000 copies on iTunes, etc., yet nearly 10 times this “sales” volume (288,000) was cobbled together from single-track streams.

The music industry is facing a bit of an existential crisis, then: How can something (streaming) be considered the “equivalent” of something else (an album sale) when, by your own measure, the former now completely dominates the latter?

In 2018, “streaming-equivalent albums” seems like daft phrasing. It is e-mail-equivalent faxes. It is car-equivalent steeds. It is Netflix-equivalent Betamax.

The death of the album track, if not the album itself, is having a significant commercial impact.

Lucas Keller is the founder of Milk & Honey in Los Angeles, a management firm that looks after some of the hottest behind-the-scenes pop songwriters and producers in the modern marketplace. He told Music Business Worldwide this week that the days of his clients making any real money from non-hit album tracks are now “pretty much over.” Keller commented, “I sit at a dashboard . . . showing the publishing revenue across the board on all of my clients, and I have a really good idea what Track 9 isn’t worth.”

The music industry is waking up to this fact, and it’s keen to to arrest the devastation. On Saturday, October 13th, the U.K. music business clubbed together to launch a nationwide campaign: National Album Day.

This was a big deal. The major labels (via the BPI), the independent labels (via AIM), the Official Charts Company and a vast network of U.K. music retailers joined forces to push their crusade to the public. It got wall-to-wall coverage on the radio channels of the BBC — another key partner.

The idea was to ape some of the magic of Record Store Day, the annual initiative that sees a yearly surge in physical music-buying on both sides of the Atlantic. Can you guess what happened?

Despite everyone’s best efforts, U.K. album sales fell slightly in the week of National Album Day.

As predicted by Daniel Ek four years ago, the public is obviously growing increasingly comfortable with its playlist-driven, track-led music-consumption habits. The music industry, however, is starting to question whether it’s quite so sure.

Tim Ingham is the founder and publisher of Music Business Worldwide, which has serviced the global industry with news, analysis and jobs since 2015. He writes a weekly column for “Rolling Stone.”
 
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