Michael Jackson's attitude towards women in his music

staywild23

Premium Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2022
Messages
3,170
Points
113
We don’t know if he had groupies coming to his room but I have seen MJ collecting notes from fans on stage with what I presume would be phone numbers during the Triumph tour. So it could have happened.

I really don't know why anyone would presume to know anything about who Michael slept with, or didn't sleep with, unless they are Michael or the women in question. This includes groupies. While I doubt he did that a lot, if at all (mostly because of stuff he has said about this stuff), there is no way of knowing. But there is no doubt whatsoever he had PLENTY of opportunity. And opportunity and temptation is what Dirty Diana is all about. But like Hiker said, it's all storytelling anyway.

We also know little MJ had a fling with a girl at school during milk break… only the die hards know what i’m talking about here 😉
I heard they fell out over finger painting....no?
 

staywild23

Premium Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2022
Messages
3,170
Points
113
I don't think is Michael giving his own opinion on the topic of abortion in Abortion Papers. I interpret Abortion Papers as a song that is written from the perspective of a girl who is a strict Christian and she is thinking about getting an abortion, but she is in two minds about it due to her religion and upbringing. That is how I interpret it.

Very much how I interpret it too! I don't think it's making a personal statement on his beliefs, but I think he recognized it might be misinterpreted as that. Either way, I think it's a great song haha. And I'm most definitely in agreement with @Hiker when it comes to my own beliefs on the matter.
 

ChrisC

Proud Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2010
Messages
3,293
Points
63
Michael appeared to worship the women in his life. His mother Katherine is depicted as almost divine when he speaks of her. Diana Ross and Elizabeth Taylor of whom he seemed to be both an adoring fan and long time friend. Liza Minelli. His closeness to his sisters growing up and into early adulthood. The continued presence of Lisa-Marie in his life post-divorce.

I love that interest in dissecting his inspiration artistically, but if it's just to prop up some silly discrediting notion you've conjured then it's a little redundant.
 

mj_frenzy

Proud Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2014
Messages
2,253
Points
63
Location
Greece
If you believe everything that was written about Michael, then you have to also believe the books written by fans like Shana Mangatal claiming they had steamy affairs with Michael. So which one are you going to believe?
Shana Mangatal's book has a lot of inconsistencies, loopholes and ambiguities in the sections about her alleged affair with the singer.

For example, she avoids providing exact dates of her alleged romantic meetings with him.

If these meetings actually happened, these were some very important events in her life (where a female fan has a romantic encounter with her idol).

So she should have been able to remember the exact dates of them and then to put these exact dates in her book.

Check for that reason the section about the Universal Hilton Hotel (California) in which she alleged that one of these affairs with him took place (no exact date is provided).
If you want to believe every word that Michael wrote, then read Moonwalk. On page 110, he says "it always surprises me when people assume that something an artist has created is based on a true experience or reflects his or her own lifestyle."
Despite his claims in his book that generally the songs that he wrote are not necessarily based on a true experience, or that they do not reflect his own lifestyle, one may say that the recurrent portrayal of women in such a negative light in many of his songs shows eventually a particular attitude towards them.

Or, put it that way: assuming that he had a positive attitude towards them, then why did he feel the need to write such songs, and even to release many of them?
 
  • Like
Reactions: SoS

Hess

Proud Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2006
Messages
11,710
Points
113
I really don't see any hate against women in these songs...

I am male and straight, I love women - and I still could have written these songs without thinking anything degrading about women...

I think this overanalyses the songs waay too much...
 

SoS

Proud Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2011
Messages
4,108
Points
63
It is implied from the lyrics.

Note also that at point he says that he wants to take her away from that job, by traveling together to various places around the world (like, New York City, Paris, France).

Also, both Quincy Jones and Frank DiLeo dismissed Michael Jackson's idea about including it on the album apparently because the album would have sounded too misogynistic.
Where do you here something about a job?

It is conjecture as to the reason being they thought it sounded that way unless of course you heard that as a quote or interview.
 

SoS

Proud Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2011
Messages
4,108
Points
63
Shana Mangatal's book has a lot of inconsistencies, loopholes and ambiguities in the sections about her alleged affair with the singer.

For example, she avoids providing exact dates of her alleged romantic meetings with him.

If these meetings actually happened, these were some very important events in her life (where a female fan has a romantic encounter with her idol).

So she should have been able to remember the exact dates of them and then to put these exact dates in her book.

Check for that reason the section about the Universal Hilton Hotel (California) in which she alleged that one of these affairs with him took place (no exact date is provided).

Despite his claims in his book that generally the songs that he wrote are not necessarily based on a true experience, or that they do not reflect his own lifestyle, one may say that the recurrent portrayal of women in such a negative light in many of his songs shows eventually a particular attitude towards them.

Or, put it that way: assuming that he had a positive attitude towards them, then why did he feel the need to write such songs, and even to release many of them?
That’s an interesting question because we would have to firmly agree that he’s down grading women.

I see him as using his platform to express to women he’s had painful experiences with what he felt.

That’s what he did. He expressed himself for a living. That much is obvious.

He’s also obviously going to offer a disclaimer of sorts. That’s just what any artist would say who wants to try and guarantee their privacy..

He expresses something with each song, whether he wrote it or not.

He had creative control over 100% of his productions.
 

SoS

Proud Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2011
Messages
4,108
Points
63
Are we talking about the same Streetwalker song? The one that goes "never met a girl just like you" "baby I love you"? It is such an upbeat song. Do people know that songs are fictional, just like stories. There is probably not an actual Streetwalker who Michael loves!

Abortion Papers is a different story, I want to forget he wrote it, I want to ask him what he was thinking! Maybe he was pro-life and he wanted to express that. Maybe he did not think about it because, well, he was not a woman. Maybe given his religious background, he thought it was ok. I don't even know what was going on in the world at the time he wrote it. So in his own words - unless I sat down with him and talked song by song about what he meant, what is his real personal opinion vs lyrics that fit the melody, I have no right to judge him.

If you want to believe every word that Michael wrote, then read Moonwalk. On page 110, he says "it always surprises me when people assume that something an artist has created is based on a true experience or reflects his or her own lifestyle. Often nothing could be farther from the truth."
By your saying, “there’s probably not a streetwalker Michael loved” is an example of why I believe he’d hide personal references in his music from his fans. Because they will always interpret his love for someone he says “I love you “ to in a song to be “probably not” what he’s doing so that if he ever did so, it would be sure to go incog to females.

I’m certain there’s an intelligent and interesting reason many lyrics sound unintelligible to the naked ear.

The man was a perfectionist. There are zero “accidents” in this immortal artists’ music.

Of course songs are stories. The definition of a story is a beginning middle and end.

It can be a fable, or a direct memory set to verse.

It is all 1 man’s multi-medium expression.

A person can only write what the brain has a frame of reference for.

I personally don’t count, “I don’t sing it if I don’t mean it” because clearly he had no choice which is why he left Motown.

By 1989 he was also free of Q’s guidance, direction, and influence.

He was free to say whatever his heart desired. His.
 

DuranDuran

Proud Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
11,511
Points
83
Despite his claims in his book that generally the songs that he wrote are not necessarily based on a true experience, or that they do not reflect his own lifestyle, one may say that the recurrent portrayal of women in such a negative light in many of his songs shows eventually a particular attitude towards them.
Going by this logic, then why aren't all of those blues, country, gangsta rap, rock, etc artists in jail for all the things they claim to do in their songs? What about horrorcore rap, death metal, & goth music? Although not all blues songs are about sad or bad things happening, the entire genre is largely about that. That's what the word "blues" means. Such as "my woman or man is cheating on me", "my dog left", "I got drunk and got in a fight and shot a man", and so on. Do you think Rick Dees really met a disco duck or Charlie Daniels had a fiddle battle with the devil? I guess Weird Al must like food since many of his songs are about that, 🤣 He even has a compilation album called The Food Album.
 

SoS

Proud Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2011
Messages
4,108
Points
63
It is implied from the lyrics.

Note also that at point he says that he wants to take her away from that job, by traveling together to various places around the world (like, New York City, Paris, France).

Also, both Quincy Jones and Frank DiLeo dismissed Michael Jackson's idea about including it on the album apparently because the album would have sounded too misogynistic.
Please quote the lyric/s that imply:
1: she went to another
And
2. There was a reference to job/working

All my comments are obviously opinions based solely on what is out of the mouth of Michael Jackson into anyone’s audio receiver. In other words, what I hear and do not hear. Not what I think.

I would appreciate an answer to my question with lyrical (word) references please

Since I’m basing my opinings on what I hear, I want to know what you hear and do not hear also, not what you think, if that makes sense.

Listening to his music ids different for everyone which is I guess why he’s the greatest selling artist worldwide.

So I realize this depth of analysis is not fun for everyone. This topic is full of variety thanks to Michael’s versatility so anyone who doesn’t want to shouldn’t have to focus on it in such detail. It’s understandable.
 
Last edited:

zinniabooklover

Proud Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2022
Messages
6,884
Points
113
MJ is all about melody and vocal delivery/arrangement I think often lyrics were almost an afterthought in his music.
I wish we could know more about this. Brad Sundberg refers to this in one of the 7 Songs 7 Stories videos - can't remember offhand which one - but the guy he's interviewing mentions Michael coming up with some lyrics at the last minute, Brad laughs and says something which implies that this happened often, the other guy also laughs, as if in agreement. Michael was more interested in the melody, we know that. And that makes sense. But this thing of lyrics being almost an afterthought, it's interesting.
 

SoS

Proud Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2011
Messages
4,108
Points
63
I wish we could know more about this. Brad Sundberg refers to this in one of the 7 Songs 7 Stories videos - can't remember offhand which one - but the guy he's interviewing mentions Michael coming up with some lyrics at the last minute, Brad laughs and says something which implies that this happened often, the other guy also laughs, as if in agreement. Michael was more interested in the melody, we know that. And that makes sense. But this thing of lyrics being almost an afterthought, it's interesting.
I agree. As he demonstrated in the Mexico deposition about TGIM

He also explained the origins of the idea for the song lyrics being from the experience of guys vying with each other over which one of them she was looking at.

Sounds like although the lyrics were the last component he wasn’t as much “after”-thinking everything as it appeared. He had a frame of reference through experience or observations. That’s a given, it would seem to me.

You can write a poem about rain if you have no frame of reference what so ever, or does someone not concur? I’m totally open as dogmatic as I may seem about it all lol it completely fascinates me how others here what I do not and or vice-versa..

“selling sex”? I don’t hear ANYTHING about it

Job/working??

I Just don’t hear it and I want to know what comes before it and after it so I can look/listen for it.

Pretty please...thanks
 
Last edited:

zinniabooklover

Proud Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2022
Messages
6,884
Points
113
I agree. As he demonstrated in the Mexico deposition about TGIM

He also explained the origins of the idea for the song being from the experience of guys vying with each other over which one of them she was looking at.

Sounds like although the lyrics were the last component he wasn’t as much “after”-thinking everything as it appeared. He had a frame of reference through experience or observations.
Mm, I could have written that a bit more carefully, lol. I didn't mean 'afterthought' as if it was just something Michael did carelessly. His lyrics were good and he did, as you rightly say, have a frame of reference or specific ideas he wanted to explore. The Mexico depo is such a brilliant insight into his way of working. I love it. That's kind of what I mean. I wish we had more of that.

He did say that sometimes the song appeared in his head complete with lyrics or at least with *some* of the lyrics already written. I think he says it about WATW in the Ebony / Jet interview. So writing them down at the last minute doesn't necessarily mean he was writing them for the first time at that point.

But I think there is something in this little moment in the 7 Songs 7 Stories video. There's a story there. I would just love to know more.
 

mj_frenzy

Proud Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2014
Messages
2,253
Points
63
Location
Greece
Please quote the lyric/s that imply:
1: she went to another
And
2. There was a reference to job/working
'Streetwalker' is purposefully left with no specific lyrical references about that.

That was a common practice on his part when he wrote and sang about that theme because he did not want to be so obvious about it, but to refer to it in a rather subtle way.

For example, he does the same thing in 'Who Is It' where he touches upon the theme of prostitution without being so obvious about it.

In 'Who Is It', he also sings about a sex worker (in this case, about a high-end prostitute) but the song purposefully is left again with no specific lyrical references about that.

There was of course an occasion when he decided to clearly sing about that, although the song was not written by him (in 'Hot Street', outtake from the 'Thriller' album).
 

zinniabooklover

Proud Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2022
Messages
6,884
Points
113
'Streetwalker' is purposefully left with no specific lyrical references about that.

That was a common practice on his part when he wrote and sang about that theme because he did not want to be so obvious about it, but to refer to it in a rather subtle way.
There's nothing subtle about the title 'Streetwalker'. I'm not convinced Michael is going for subtlety here.

In 'Who Is It', he also sings about a sex worker
But does he? It's the video that brings in the theme of a high-class prostitute.

(in this case, about a high-end prostitute) but the song purposefully is left again with no specific lyrical references about that.
This just proves that lyrics are always open to interpretation. I don't understand the lyrics of Who Is It in this way at all. It's the video that presents a story about a prostitute. The lyrics just tell a story of a guy who's girlfriend has left him and he doesn't know who she's been having the affair with. It doesn't really matter, of course, the song *could* be about a prostitute and the deluded client she managed to scam but the lyrics don't make that clear and I don't think they are referring to it in a subtle way, either. It's another Leave Me Alone. The lyrics and the video don't match up but people always now assume that LMA is about media intrusion whereas the lyrics tell a different story.

There's a story here about betrayal, loss and broken dreams. I'm not so convinced WII is about deluded clients and prostitutes.
 

Hiker

MJJC Staff
Staff member
Joined
Feb 5, 2022
Donations
$20.00
Messages
2,412
Points
113
That was a common practice on his part when he wrote and sang about that theme because he did not want to be so obvious about it, but to refer to it in a rather subtle way.
This is way too much guessing about what Michael thought at that time! Way toooooo much. You have no way of knowing it.

But does he? It's the video that brings in the theme of a high-class prostitute.
Exactly, Who Is It lyrics have nothing to do with a call girl, it's just a choice for the video.

PS: I do believe everyone should feel free to express their views here on the forum, but sadly in my opinion this thread is very close to the trolling line.
 

staywild23

Premium Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2022
Messages
3,170
Points
113
The lyrics just tell a story of a guy who's girlfriend has left him and he doesn't know who she's been having the affair with. It doesn't really matter, of course, the song *could* be about a prostitute and the deluded client she managed to scam but the lyrics don't make that clear and I don't think they are referring to it in a subtle way, either. It's another Leave Me Alone. The lyrics and the video don't match up but people always now assume that LMA is about media intrusion whereas the lyrics tell a different story.

There's a story here about betrayal, loss and broken dreams. I'm not so convinced WII is about deluded clients and prostitutes.

Thank you for saying this. I actually find it so annoying that people talk about Leave Me Alone like it's about media intrusion. The first time I heard Leave Me Alone I was just listening to the album on repeat while working on a big art piece, so I wasn't distracted by the video or anything, and I remember feeling like omg, I totally feel these lyrics. That horrible experience of a person from your past who hurt you so bad continuing to return over, and over, and over, to the point that you are just kind of begging them to go away permanently so you can actually move on. I've experienced that and so when I heard that song, I felt the torment. But when I saw the video I was like wtf lol. Don't get me wrong, I love the video. But I think on Michael's part it was classic misdirection. I imagine whoever he was writing these songs about knew and that it was a clear message between Michael and that person. His music was so powerfully expressive and painful. But as vulnerable as he would get, I think his videos were a great way of misdirecting so no one could ever put their finger on what (or who) he was talking about. Brilliant.

Regarding Who is It I am also 100% in agreement with you. That video is clearly its own story. The lyrics are not about that. They are very clearly about relationship pain, torment, infidelity, paranoia, suffering.

All of this said, I have always felt that his references to escorts, or whatever, was more of a metaphor for women who he felt he had to "pay" in some way for their attention and love. Not everything should be taken so literally.

Again, it's art. It's storytelling. It's open to interpretation.
 
Last edited:

zinniabooklover

Proud Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2022
Messages
6,884
Points
113
Thank you for saying this. I actually find it so annoying that people talk about Leave Me Alone like it's about media intrusion.
I have the same reaction. I also find it annoying. There is nothing wrong with the LMA video, of course. It's fine. But it has nothing to do with the lyrics and it's a shame that the story being told in the lyrics gets overshadowed by the video. It's a really strong story, one many people can relate to. The video is a fabulous piece of art. Beautifully conceived, brilliantly executed. Looks great. And so relevant to Michael's life. But people often seem to assume that the video IS the story even though it isn't.

His music was so powerfully expressive and painful.
Exactly. So let's not obscure that by forgetting what the lyrics for LMA are actually saying. This is a painful story and a powerful one. I just don't want it to disappear underneath the video but it sometimes feels like it already has.

Regarding Who is It I am also 100% in agreement with you. That video is clearly its own story. The lyrics are not about that. They are very clearly about relationship pain, torment, infidelity, paranoia, suffering.
Yes, again. The story in the video for WII is fine, no real problem with it except it takes people's attention away from the lyrics which don't really need the melodrama of a prostitute story being dropped into the picture. The actual story being told is so strong and interesting and painful and vivid - there is a lot to engage with. I just think it's a mistake to attach too much importance to the story in the WII video. It's a whole separate thing that really has nothing much to do with the actual song.

All of this said, I have always felt that his references to escorts, or whatever, was more of a metaphor for women who he felt he had to "pay" in some way for their attention and love. Not everything should be taken so literally.
Agree. I've seen similar theories posited around this. Literal interpretations have their place and sometimes are the actual correct interpretation. But I feel a lot is lost if people cling too much to that way of looking at a song. Metaphors, imagery, allegories, associations, using lyrics as a starting point ... I find all of that far more interesting as a way of engaging with a set of lyrics.

Again, it's art. It's storytelling. It's open to interpretation.
Indeed.
 

Hiker

MJJC Staff
Staff member
Joined
Feb 5, 2022
Donations
$20.00
Messages
2,412
Points
113
Thank you for saying this. I actually find it so annoying that people talk about Leave Me Alone like it's about media intrusion. The first time I heard Leave Me Alone I was just listening to the album on repeat while working on a big art piece, so I wasn't distracted by the video or anything, and I remember feeling like omg, I totally feel these lyrics.
Yeah, you have to fit the lyrics into the video, its not obvious. Though the video of LMA is fun in itself! It could have taken a totally different direction. Its interesting to think of it as deliberate misdirection on Michael's part, never thought about it that way.

Yes, again. The story in the video for WII is fine, no real problem with it except it takes people's attention away from the lyrics which don't really need the melodrama of a prostitute story being dropped into the picture. The actual story being told is so strong and interesting and painful and vivid - there is a lot to engage with. I just think it's a mistake to attach too much importance to the story in the WII video. It's a whole separate thing that really has nothing much to do with the actual song.
Same as LMA, the video could have been done totally differently with just a regular woman who cheats on her boyfriend. The story of the call girl in video could also be a metaphor, where a woman keeps running after different things, maybe material things, while she had a perfect boyfriend all along. By the time she realises it, its too late.

Again, it's art. It's storytelling. It's open to interpretation.
Exactly, like any art, its open to interpretation. Only Michael can tell exactly what he meant, we cannot really guess it by looking at the final version of the songs or videos.
 

staywild23

Premium Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2022
Messages
3,170
Points
113
I have the same reaction. I also find it annoying. There is nothing wrong with the LMA video, of course. It's fine. But it has nothing to do with the lyrics and it's a shame that the story being told in the lyrics gets overshadowed by the video.
Totally agree with this, except I also absolutely love the LMA video. I think it's visually stunning and just beyond creative. I just don't like that it makes people lazy listeners. I've always been a person that cares tremendously about lyrics, so it's hard for me to process that other people may take it at face value.

Yeah, you have to fit the lyrics into the video, its not obvious. Though the video of LMA is fun in itself! It could have taken a totally different direction. Its interesting to think of it as deliberate misdirection on Michael's part, never thought about it that way.

I actually never thought about it that way until this conversation either! But it makes a lot of sense for who Michael was as an artist. Artistically speaking, he was brilliant at leading our attention to whatever he wanted us to see. There is so much evidence of that. The fact that he made a video completely unrelated to the lyrical content feels like a statement in itself!

Exactly. So let's not obscure that by forgetting what the lyrics for LMA are actually saying. This is a painful story and a powerful one. I just don't want it to disappear underneath the video but it sometimes feels like it already has.
Unfortunately, I think it has for the average listener. Maybe not the people on this forum, but more casual fans. But I agree with you. It's an extremely painful song that is very relatable for a lot of people.

Yes, again. The story in the video for WII is fine, no real problem with it except it takes people's attention away from the lyrics which don't really need the melodrama of a prostitute story being dropped into the picture. The actual story being told is so strong and interesting and painful and vivid - there is a lot to engage with. I just think it's a mistake to attach too much importance to the story in the WII video. It's a whole separate thing that really has nothing much to do with the actual song.
Same as LMA, the video could have been done totally differently with just a regular woman who cheats on her boyfriend. The story of the call girl in video could also be a metaphor, where a woman keeps running after different things, maybe material things, while she had a perfect boyfriend all along. By the time she realises it, its too late.

It never even occurred to me until this thread that anyone would ever erase the actual story being told in Who Is It with the story told in the short film for the song. That is so disappointing to me. Who Is It is absolutely one of my favorite songs by Michael and it represents to me the pure authenticity of his songwriting and vocal performances. The pain in that song is suffocating. I feel it in my bones. It pulls me back into heartbreak I left behind years ago. It wrecks me. It makes me feel insane, the way I felt in those times. It just moves me on another level. For me, that song is almost like the biographical version of events - the nonfiction, if you will - while the video is a fictionalized version of the same event. It is emotionally resonant and true, but it uses narrative in a different way to tell a different kind of story.


Metaphors, imagery, allegories, associations, using lyrics as a starting point ... I find all of that far more interesting as a way of engaging with a set of lyrics.
This! I think Michael's songwriting and lyrics are more sophisticated than people give him credit for.
 

zinniabooklover

Proud Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2022
Messages
6,884
Points
113
Totally agree with this, except I also absolutely love the LMA video. I think it's visually stunning and just beyond creative.
Oh, you've confused me now! I love the LMA video. It's fabulous. I just get frustrated that it leads people into believing that it tells the story of the lyrics when it doesn't. But it's a great piece of work in its own right.
This! I think Michael's songwriting and lyrics are more sophisticated than people give him credit for.
So frustrating. He's a really good lyricist but weirdly underrated.
 

Hiker

MJJC Staff
Staff member
Joined
Feb 5, 2022
Donations
$20.00
Messages
2,412
Points
113
It never even occurred to me until this thread that anyone would ever erase the actual story being told in Who Is It with the story told in the short film for the song. That is so disappointing to me. Who Is It is absolutely one of my favorite songs by Michael and it represents to me the pure authenticity of his songwriting and vocal performances. The pain in that song is suffocating. I feel it in my bones. It pulls me back into heartbreak I left behind years ago. It wrecks me. It makes me feel insane, the way I felt in those times. It just moves me on another level. For me, that song is almost like the biographical version of events - the nonfiction, if you will - while the video is a fictionalized version of the same event. It is emotionally resonant and true, but it uses narrative in a different way to tell a different kind of story.
I first heard WII beatboxed on Oprah, and my reaction was - did you write it for me!! It speaks so intensely of heartbreaks. Though from lyrics you could think its angry, but then the way he sings it, its absolutely heart breaking. Its like he wants to be angry at this lover, forget her, but still loves her and wants to understand why why why! Well, that's my interpretation.
I recently discovered that it was part of a Pepsi commercial which sounded weird.
 

staywild23

Premium Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2022
Messages
3,170
Points
113
Oh, you've confused me now! I love the LMA video. It's fabulous. I just get frustrated that it leads people into believing that it tells the story of the lyrics when it doesn't. But it's a great piece of work in its own right.
OH, I'm sorry. I knew you meant this. I'm not sure why I phrased it the way I did, but your appreciation of the video was not lost on me. Sorry for misrepresenting your previous statement!

I first heard WII beatboxed on Oprah, and my reaction was - did you write it for me!! It speaks so intensely of heartbreaks. Though from lyrics you could think its angry, but then the way he sings it, its absolutely heart breaking. Its like he wants to be angry at this lover, forget her, but still loves her and wants to understand why why why! Well, that's my interpretation.
OMG, have you listened to the acapella version of it? It is especially heartbreaking. You can hear him starting crying. And his painful "hee hees" DESTROY me. God, he just reminds me so much of myself in that song. It's hard to even put into words. I am so in love with it.

I recently discovered that it was part of a Pepsi commercial which sounded weird.
WHAT?! I had no idea!! That is...bizarre to imagine.


PS: I feel like you, @zinniabooklover, and I totally changed the direction of this thread today and I am not mad about it lol. We'll see how long that lasts.
 

Hiker

MJJC Staff
Staff member
Joined
Feb 5, 2022
Donations
$20.00
Messages
2,412
Points
113
OMG, have you listened to the acapella version of it? It is especially heartbreaking. You can hear him starting crying. And his painful "hee hees" DESTROY me. God, he just reminds me so much of myself in that song. It's hard to even put into words. I am so in love with it.
Yes! I have!

Here is the Pepsi thing, it was posted somewhere in the forum. Its yet another take of the song, and oh God! Michael is SEXY! This belongs to another thread where we can openly appreciate these little gifts :)


PS: I feel like you, @zinniabooklover, and I totally changed the direction of this thread today and I am not mad about it lol. We'll see how long that lasts.
That was not unintentional ;)
 

staywild23

Premium Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2022
Messages
3,170
Points
113
Yes! I have!

Here is the Pepsi thing, it was posted somewhere in the forum. Its yet another take of the song, and oh God! Michael is SEXY! This belongs to another thread where we can openly appreciate these little gifts :)

Ok, the actual commercial was like a psychedelic trip (not in a good way), but MICHAEL!?! Good lord. Yeah. I can't even respond to this properly without likely alienating all the men on this thread, so I'm just going to leave this here. But thank you, Hiker. 🥵

That was not unintentional ;)
Amazing ;) :)
 

Hiker

MJJC Staff
Staff member
Joined
Feb 5, 2022
Donations
$20.00
Messages
2,412
Points
113
Ok, the actual commercial was like a psychedelic trip (not in a good way), but MICHAEL!?! Good lord. Yeah. I can't even respond to this properly without likely alienating all the men on this thread, so I'm just going to leave this here. But thank you, Hiker. 🥵
I know! Its like a weird combination of Black Or White and Who Is it, though the BoW look is always to die for! I think we can get some good gifs out of it. Given that not many people know about it, I guess it never aired in US?
 

staywild23

Premium Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2022
Messages
3,170
Points
113
I know! Its like a weird combination of Black Or White and Who Is it, though the BoW look is always to die for! I think we can get some good gifs out of it. Given that not many people know about it, I guess it never aired in US?

We definitely need to have some beautiful gifs created from this! Especially the part when he's...nvm. Wrong thread 😂

But yes, gorgeous all around.
 

Fuzball

Proud Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2017
Messages
1,739
Points
113
About 'Streetwalker':

Given that there was another song that Michael Jackson wanted to include on the album but it also failed to make the album because the song could have been perceived lyrically as too controversial and misogynistic ('Abortion Papers'), this seems to give more credence to the theory that 'Streetwalker' was also rejected by his team for the same reason.
Abortion Papers was never considered for the Bad album.
 
Top